News Links – 2021

 

Bangor, Maine, Daily News, January 10, 2021: Lucerne camp replants trees after cutting dozens from the wrong property

A summer camp on Phillips Lake has reached a deal so it can move forward with adding an overnight cabin, roofed pavilion and trail network to its 28-acre lakefront property in the Village of Lucerne. Camp CaPella, the Village of Lucerne and the Great Pond Mountain Conservation Trust finalized the agreement this past fall after the camp, which serves children and adults with disabilities, mistakenly cut dozens of trees and installed power poles on land owned by Lucerne in 2019. The Great Pond Mountain Conservation Trust has a development easement on and manages the land where the trees were cut down. The poles, erected to provide electricity to a parking area where the camp planned to build two cabins, have since been moved onto camp property. And a licensed forester last year planted more than 80 trees on village property, said Ann Fossett, chair of Lucerne’s board of overseers. The trees were also watered to ensure they survived the drought, she said. Lucerne is an incorporated village within the town of Dedham, approved by the Legislature in 1927, that has its own elected board of representatives — called overseers instead of selectmen — and its own development standards separate from the rest of the town…

San Francisco, California, Chronicle, January 11, 2021: GoFundMe campaign for vandalized cherry blossom trees in SF’s Japantown raises over $22k in one day

A GoFundMe campaign created by the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California raised over $22,000 on Friday to replace two of its cherry blossom trees that were destroyed in an act of vandalism. Hundreds of donors flooded the campaign with contributions, more than quadrupling the center’s $5,000 goal in a single day. “The cherry blossom trees will bloom again,” read an update from the organization. “The Center would like to thank everyone for their outpouring of support during this time.” View the fundraiser here. For Paul Osaki, 2021 was supposed to symbolize a fresh start and a renewed sense of hope for his Japantown community. But as he looked down at what was left of the splintered cherry blossom trees planted on the sidewalk in front of the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California, all he could feel was pain. The branches on both of the historically significant trees on San Francisco’s Sutter Street had been hacked off entirely before their buds could bloom, leaving only their gnarled trunks behind. A staff member at the center was the first to discover the slashed trees early Tuesday morning, but after reviewing security footage found that the vandalism had taken place over a span of a few days…

Westchester, Pennsylvania Patch, January 11, 2021: Tree Removal Has Phoenixville’s Attention, Meeting Tonight

Phoenixville Borough’s Tree Advisory Committee meets tonight, even as residents post photos of tree removal happening along borough streets, some asking if all the trees qualify as “diseased.” The committee meets Jan. 11 at 6:30 p.m. in a Zoom meeting. A citizens’ group called Phoenixville Legacy Trees has 35 members and is planning to attend the meeting to advocate for the “urban forest.” Phoenixville resident Lisa Longo is concerned that the borough’s Tree Ordinance. Longo told Patch she will not permit the borough to remove trees from her property. Barbara Sharp has been posting on social media photos of the trunks of trees left standing around her neighborhood. Sharp said, “Having lived with these magnificent oaks for 25 years as a Phoenixville homeowner, I do understand the problems involved —buckling sidewalks (responsibility of homeowner), pollen and sap damaging cars parked beneath, limbs falling and endless leaf raking…”

New Hampshire Public Radio, January 8, 2021: Do Trees Like Being Hugged?

An anonymous listener in Vermont asks: “I walk everyday and there are lots of trees in Vermont and I’m a tree hugger and I mean literally a tree hugger. And so I hug them and I always feel a sense of calm and I’m wondering if there’s anything that makes that happen? Do the trees notice when I hug them?” The first part of the question I think is fairly easy. Why might you feel calm while hugging a tree? It is likely for some of the same reasons that going outside generally make us feel calm. At this point there are heaps of studies about the mental benefits of being outside. A hypothesis for why that might be that has come into vogue in recent years is that attention is a limited resource and we’ve only got so much of it to expend each day. So being outside means “your attention is able to drift much more naturally, in a much more relaxed way from moment to moment,” explains science journalist Ferris Jabr. “You might be looking at the surface of a lake, watching the ripples, the leaves are falling from a tree, a bird flies by — and that can replenish our mental resources.” But on to the second part of the question, which is the real reason I reached out to Jabr…

Ft. Myers, Florida, News-Press, January 9, 2021: Lee County homeowners who lost citrus trees to Florida program to receive millions in payments

The checks are in the mail. Or almost in the mail, to compensate Lee County homeowners who lost their citrus trees to the state’s failed canker-fighting campaign 15 to 17 years ago. The checks are expected to go out Friday, following a long-drawn-out legal fight, said Robert Gilbert, a Coral Gables attorney who represents the homeowners. “We’re delighted to finally distribute payments to thousands of Lee County homeowners whose private property was taken long ago. While the legal journey was long and difficult, justice ultimately prevailed,” he said…

Santa Fe, New Mexico, New Mexican, January 10, 2021: Planting trees: What we need now

In cold and dark January, it is tempting — and encouraging — to think of planting, spring gardens, summer flowers and best of all, budding trees and leafy canopies overhead. To those making plans now, consider the benefits of trees. They are important not just for adding beauty to our world but to alleviating the impact of climate change. Planting during dormant season is best, which means now until mid-March is a prime time to put spade to dirt. It can make a difference in the common battle for climate change. A study published in the journal Science last July — “The global tree restoration potential” — found the Earth could support another 2.2 billion acres of forests. Planting another half-trillion trees, according to the authors, could reduce atmospheric carbon by about 25 percent. This is not an overnight fix, but it could buy time as the nations of the world reduce carbon emissions and take other steps to bring the globe back into balance. Now, take that global perspective and bring it home to New Mexico…

Cleveland, Ohio, Plain Dealer, January 10, 2021: Historic, 150-year-old Prospect Avenue elm tree removed

A little bit of Cleveland’s history is gone, after one of the city’s oldest trees was recently removed. An elm tree, which towered above historic row homes on Prospect Avenue, has been reduced to a stump. Jamie Miles, a Cleveland resident, learned about the tree’s removal in early January and took photos of the stump. Miles had last seen the tree standing about two months prior. The tree was at least 150 years old, estimated to be planted in 1868 as one of the earliest street-tree plantings in Cleveland along Euclid Avenue and Prospect, according to a June 11, 1986, article in The Plain Dealer…

Houston, Texas. Chronicle, January 10, 2021: Tips for turning seeds into trees

How exciting to think of a full-size tree locked up within each seed still clinging to the branches of sugar maples, hornbeams, oaks, sycamores and other trees at the end of summer. It was with such visions that I dropped an apple seed into some potting soil in an 8-inch clay flowerpot one autumn day years ago. I wish I could write that the seed has now been transformed into a majestic tree. But no, the seed germinated, started to grow, then stalled at about 4 inches high. The reason for the lack of growth was that apple seeds, like the seeds of many other trees native to cold climates, need pre-treatment before they will germinate or grow well. I was lucky the seed germinated at all! Since then, I’ve learned the tricks of growing trees from seeds. If an apple or maple seed grew as soon as it touched ground in late summer or early fall, the life of the tender young seedlings would be short indeed, snuffed out with the first frost. So most tree seeds that ripen in fall are able to stay dormant until they’re convinced that winter is over…

Science, January 7, 2021: Dismay greets end of U.S. effort to curb spread of tree-killing beetle

Later this month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will formally admit defeat along one front of its battle against a devastating invasive insect. Starting 14 January, the agency will no longer regulate the movement of living ash trees or borer-infested wood within the United States. This quarantine has, for more than 10 years, formed the cornerstone of the federal government’s strategy for curbing the spread of the emerald ash borer, an iridescent green beetle that threatens to wipe out North America’s ash trees, an ecological linchpin of many forests. Instead, USDA plans to ramp up an effort to control the borer by releasing tiny wasps that parasitize and kill the beetles. The shift is controversial. Some scientists and environmental advocates agree that, after spending some $350 million over the past 2 decades to fight the ash borer, the government should redirect scarce resources to more promising strategies. But others argue the surrender is premature, and some states are vowing to maintain local controls on ash tree and wood movement. “I worry that this decision hastens the rate at which [ash] trees are threatened,” says Leigh Greenwood, a forest health specialist at the Nature Conservancy. “This is one layer of protection we’re taking away.” The emerald ash borer first gained notoriety in 2002, when ash trees in the Detroit area started mysteriously dying. After researchers identified the insect, which was accidentally imported from Asia, Michigan and USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) imposed a quarantine that prohibited export of ash trees and wood from inside the infested zone. Biologists also began to set traps to monitor the spread of the beetle…

Omaha, Nebraska, World-Herald, January 8, 2021: Removing dying and dead ash trees

I know there has been a lot of emphasis on the chemical treatment of ash trees for emerald ash borer but we now need to think about the dangerous task of removing dying and dead ash trees. These trees are a risk to our community safety. I know this is a major problem in the older section of Gretna where the houses are very close together and there is a large ash tree in the back yard. The wood properties in dying and dead ash trees from emerald ash borer is very different from healthy ash trees. Their failure is unpredictable. We know ash tree wood does split easier than most other trees, but the borer dries out these trees quickly and causes them to fail sooner than can be predicted. The tree just splits apart when it hits the ground. The removal of dying or street-side dead ash is one problem, but the other problem is that falling dead ash trees have killed people and damaged property. People have been killed by these trees as they walk or drive down the street in their cars. The trees have collapsed on houses and are a risk to arborists that are removing them…

Jackson, Michigan, Citizen-Patriot, January 7, 2021: Clark Lake family has to ‘start over from scratch’ after Christmas tree fire destroys house

Beth and Todd Snay are figuring out what to do next after a fire destroyed their Clark Lake house. They were home with their son Jonathon Snay, who serves in the Air Force, just before 11 p.m., Dec. 30 in the 9000 block of Vining Street when their dog started barking. Todd Snay looked over to see what was happening, Beth Snay said. “My husband … told me, ‘I noticed there was a fireball coming from the top part of the (Christmas) tree,’” Beth Snay said. “He started pulling me off the couch and yelling and screaming at our son who was upstairs.” Firefighters spent about five hours putting the fire out. The roof and second floor collapsed onto the first floor, covering the fire, making it difficult for crews to access the flames. An excavation company was called in to help uncover the layers, Columbia Township Fire Department Chief Scott Cota said previously. Beyond the family’s two dogs, they couldn’t get anything out of the house, including their cellphones, eldest daughter Jessica Kent said. She was at her own house when the fire started, but her family told her about the experience, including how the fire alarms didn’t go off. Kent knew they were operational. “I know they work because we baked cookies the week before and they went off just from baking cookies,” she said…

Sacramento, California, Bee, January 7, 2021: Vandals decimate historic cherry blossom trees at Japanese center, California group says

Vandals destroyed historic cherry blossom trees in front of a San Francisco Japanese community center, the group said Wednesday. Every branch was vandalized and broken off the trees until only the trunks remained, the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California said. “This was not simply a passerby trying to break a branch off for fun,” Executive Director Paul Osaki said in the post. “Someone took their time breaking off every branch.” The branches were more than 3 feet thick and the trees were up to 15 feet high, Osaki said. No branches were left on any trees. “This was no easy task,” Osaki said. A similar incident happened two years ago when a third tree was vandalized, the group said. The tree was nearly destroyed then, too. The cherry blossom trees were planted in San Francisco’s Japantown in 1994 when the emperor and empress of Japan visited, according to the community center. Fifty years prior, the Redevelopment Agency in the city had uprooted every tree in Japantown, the group said…

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Gazette, January 6, 2021: Iowa DNR plants 100,000 trees for state park centennial

To celebrate the 2020 centennial of the Iowa state park system, the Department of Natural Resources planted at least 100,000 trees, nearly triple the number planted in a typical year. The milestone planting commemorate not only the 100th anniversary of the state park system, but also the centennial of the National Association of State Foresters. Members of association participated in the 2020 Centennial Challenge to plant millions of trees across the United States. The native Iowa trees were supplied by the State Forest Nursery and planted in Iowa’s four state forests, dozens of wildlife management areas and 23 of its state parks, according to Emma Hanigan, urban forestry coordinator. Over the previous five years, she said, the department planted about 35,000 tree plantings each year. In addition to DNR funds, the plantings were aided by a grant from the Arbor Day Foundation. Hanigan estimated the grant covered the internal production costs of about 55,200 seedlings…

Wausau, Wisconsin, WAOW-TV, January 6, 2021: City of Wausau to remove all ash trees after ash borer sighting

Wausau Parks officials announced they’re planning to remove all ash trees in the city after emerald ash borers were found. The city plans to do this gradually over a period of about 12 to 15 years. They’ll remove a few trees at a time, keeping the rest protected with a treatment. Officials plan to replace the ash trees with other types of infection-resistant trees. “A tree that is infested with emerald ash borer larva becomes brittle and very hazardous within about four years,” said Andy Sims, city forester. “The scary part of that is, we don’t really know how long the borer’s been in a tree…”

Portland, Oregon, KGW-TV, January 6, 2021: Train cars moving lumber derail after hitting tree on tracks

A Union Pacific train carrying lumber derailed after hitting a large tree that had fallen on the tracks along Highway 99 between Canby and Oregon City, authorities said. The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office said three locomotives and 15 rail cars derailed at around 1:30 a.m. Wednesday. The engineer of the train complained of pain, deputies said, but no one else was injured. None of the debris or rail cars blocked the highway, which was temporarily fully closed…

Huntsville, Alabama, WHNT-TV, January 4, 2021: Prompt removal of Christmas trees encouraged

It’s time to say goodbye to our Christmas trees. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) strongly encourages the removal of live Christmas trees sooner rather than later. According to the NFPA, almost one-third or 31% of U.S home fires that begin Christmas trees occur in January. The longer a live tree is kept in a home the more likely it is to become dry and catch fire. “All Christmas trees can burn, but a dried-out tree can become engulfed in flames in a matter of seconds,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “In a year where many people began decorating their homes earlier than usual, trees have been in homes longer than usual, presenting an increased fire risk as the days go by.” The NFPA and U.S Forest Service both advise against burning your tree yourself in fireplaces or wood burning stoves. They instead recommend using community recycling programs…

Associated Press, January 5, 2021: Cornell to fell more than 1,700 ash trees infested by beetle

An invasive insect that kills ash trees is prompting Cornell University to fell 1,700 of the trees on its lands, a step it says will visibly alter the campus’s appearance. The trees infested by the emerald ash borer will be felled between January and the end of March and include trees on and off campus, the university said Dec. 22. The beetle, which bores under the tree’s bark, kills most infested ash trees within four years, creating a hazard. “This is a safety issue with trees that are dying or near death, and will eventually fall, so we are going to need to take them down in order to limit concerns about public safety and property damage,” said Todd Bittner, director of natural areas for Cornell Botanic Gardens…

Austin, Texas, KVUE-TV, January 5, 2021: Cedar fever: How much do you know about the trees that cause our sniffles and sneezes?

One can’t deny the scenic beauty of Austin. But lurking among the millions of trees that grace our city are some that many don’t appreciate this time of year: Ashe Junipers, also known as Mountain Cedar, whose pollen causes severe allergic reactions for many. Pollen literally explodes from the trees after a cold snap, with January seeing the greatest eruptions. But while they’re a familiar part of the Austin landscape, do you know much about these evergreens? Here are some fun facts: The Texas A&M Forest Service estimates that there are over 13 million of them. In fact, the Ashe Juniper makes up 39% of the estimated 33.8 million trees in Austin – the biggest category of trees in the city. They were here long before we arrived. Ashe Junipers first appeared during the Ice Age, which began around two-and-a-half million years ago…

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania City Paper, January 5, 2021: Pittsburgh chosen as Reforestation Hub to increase its urban tree cover

Pittsburgh will work towards recovering some of its lost tree canopy with a new initiative through Cambium Carbon and the Arbor Day Foundation. In between 2011 and 2015, the city lost about 6% of its tree cover. Before losing tree canopy, Pittsburgh had one of the top percentages of urban tree cover of any city in the U.S. On Jan. 4, the city of Pittsburgh announced it was selected as one of four U.S. cities to receive a Reforestation Hub assessment. The program, developed by Cambium Carbon, a social impact venture focused on reforestation, in partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation, includes the development of a pilot project geared toward “improving resource efficiency and carbon capture at the municipal level,” according to a press release. The ultimate goal will be to create a “circular urban forestry system” that will include programs like tree recycling to create economic opportunities from “healthy forests, restoration of public lands, and the recovery and expansion of the tree canopy.” Other chosen Reforestation Hub host cities include Denver, New York City, and Eugene, Ore…

Abilene, Texas, KTAB-TV, January 5, 2021: Prepping to avoid tree damage during ice storms

Texas doesn’t see many ice storms so if you’re unsure how to prepare you’re not alone. Chris Witulski owns the Abilene based tree removal service “A cut above” and he and his crew have been working almost non stop since new years day to clear the yards and rooftops in Abilene of fallen branches and dead trees. Today they worked at the home of George Jackson. A lakeside estate with more than its fair share of trees. Jackson describes new years night as sounding “Like a war” with branches falling on the roof and sliding into the yard. in all they lost over 6 branches and 2 whole trees due to the ice. Witulski says that damage on this scale can be prevented with proper tree care. “The best measures you can go through is kind of thinning them out and try do lessen the weight on your trees during the winter.” said Witulski. Checking your trees for overly brushy areas or all together dead branches should be a year round practice for land and home owners. To have 6 men come to the property for a day of work “A cut above” charges $2000 dollars which Witulski says is about average for a job like this so acting early and fast can save you both time and money…

Manchester, New Hampshire, Union Leader, January 4, 2021: Candia stuck with $10K legal bill in court fight over crabapple tree

The town of Candia will have to pay nearly $10,000 in legal bills as part of an agreement with a couple who sued after the select board declared their crabapple tree a public nuisance. The tree at 14 Jane Drive will be spared, as long as it is properly pruned. Dustin and Jennifer Heiberg sued a year ago after town officials complained that branches were extending into the roadway and creating a hazard for passing vehicles. The Heibergs argued that the branches weren’t a problem and that town officials had singled out their tree and were harassing them. The couple also questioned whether the road was public. “I have lived in Candia for 10 years. The tree was here when I purchased the house. Only the town knows why they chose to single out and aggressively pursue one branch on one tree in a town that is 30 square miles,” Jennifer Heiberg said Monday. To date, the town has spent $9,923 on legal fees to fight the tree dispute, according to figures released Monday by Donna Becker, Candia’s payroll and accounting specialist. The town is still awaiting a legal bill from December…

Raleigh, North Carolina, WNCN-TV, January 4, 2021: Say goodbye to your Christmas tree due to fire hazard, fire officials say

Saying goodbye to your Christmas tree may not be easy, but due to concerns of natural trees igniting, the National Fire Protection Association is advising people to take them down after the holiday season. The association says nearly one-third (31 percent) of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occurs in January. “The longer a natural tree is kept up after Christmas, the more likely it is to dry out and ignite,” the association said in a press release. NFPA’s latest Christmas Tree Fires report, which reflects annual averages between 2014 and 2018, shows that 160 home structure fires began with Christmas trees, resulting in two civilian deaths, 14 civilian injuries, and $10.3 million in direct property damage. “All Christmas trees can burn, but a dried-out tree can become engulfed in flames in a matter of seconds,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “In a year where many people began decorating their homes earlier than usual, trees have been in homes longer than usual, presenting an increased fire risk as the days go by…”

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, MV Times, January 4, 2021: Police investigate tree removal

Oak Bluffs police are investigating the illegal removal of a catalpa tree near Ocean Park on town property. Mark Crossland of Crossland Landscape, who maintains Ocean Park for the town, posted a photo of the tree stump on the Islanders Talk Facebook page asking anyone with information on who cut down the 35 foot Catalpa tree to contact him, the Oak Bluffs police, parks department, or highway department. Speaking to The Times by phone Monday ,Sgt. Dan Cassidy said police received a call from a witness on Sunday, who after seeing a post on Islander’s Talk from Mark Crossland, said they saw the tree being removed in the afternoon on New Year’s Day by a “white male in a long coat chopping the tree down with an ax” accompanied by a couple of other men. Cassidy said he has been in contact with homeowners in the area and tree companies. Also speaking to the Times by phone Monday, highway superintendent Richard Combra said the tree was “pretty old” and the parks department wanted to keep it…

Phys.org, January 4, 2021: New uses for dead ash, fir and tamarack trees could help restore Minnesota’s forests

One invasive beetle is ready to devour just about every ash tree left in Minnesota’s woods. A caterpillar has killed more than 200,000 acres worth of balsam fir trees in just the last year. Another beetle, a native in the midst of a population boom, has already destroyed about half of the state’s tamaracks. Add it all up and pest outbreaks have left Minnesota with quite a lot of dead trees, useless lumber and dried-out and wasted stands, which, if left to rot, will become one large fire hazard. But there’s little incentive to cut ash, balsam fir and tamarack trees down—even as state and local foresters need to thin them before the pests come through—because they have limited uses and have never been highly sought for lumber. To try to change that, researchers at the University of Minnesota Duluth have been racing to find novel ways to make the trees more desirable and valuable to builders, homeowners, lumber mills, city wastewater plants and anyone else who might be willing to come and remove them both before and after the bugs take them down…

San Diego, California, Times of San Diego, December 31, 2020: Citrus Tree-Killing Bacteria Found on Insects for 1st Time in San Diego County

State agricultural inspectors have detected bacteria which can cause a disease deadly to citrus trees during routine pest trapping in Fallbrook, San Diego County officials announced Thursday. The bacteria, which is not harmful to people or animals, was detected on insects in the North County community. A routine spot check by the California Department of Food & Agriculture on Dec. 28 collected a group of four adult Asian citrus psyllids from a citrus tree on residential property in the Fallbrook area carrying the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. These bacteria can cause a citrus disease called Huanglongbing. At this time, the disease has not been detected in citrus trees in San Diego County. Samples from trees on that property and the surrounding area were undergoing tests for the disease, which is fatal to citrus trees and has no cure…

Minneapolis, Minnesota, Star Tribune, January 1, 2021: New uses for dead ash, fir and tamarack trees could help restore Minnesota’s forests

One invasive beetle is ready to devour just about every ash tree left in Minnesota’s woods. A caterpillar has killed more than 200,000 acres worth of balsam fir trees in just the last year. Another beetle, a native in the midst of a population boom, has already destroyed about half of the state’s tamaracks. Add it all up and pest outbreaks have left Minnesota with quite a lot of dead trees, useless lumber and dried-out and wasted stands, which, if left to rot, will become one large fire hazard. But there’s little incentive to cut ash, balsam fir and tamarack trees down — even as state and local foresters need to thin them before the pests come through — because they have limited uses and have never been highly sought for lumber. To try to change that, researchers at the University of Minnesota Duluth have been racing to find novel ways to make the trees more desirable and valuable to builders, homeowners, lumber mills, city wastewater plants and anyone else who might be willing to come and remove them both before and after the bugs take them down…

New York City, The New York Times, January 3, 2021: South Carolinians Mock Redesigned Palmetto Tree on Proposed State Flag

The goal was to come up with a standard design for the South Carolina state flag, one that residents could rally around, fly from their porches or proudly display on T-shirts, mugs and hats. But a proposed redesign of the beloved palmetto tree on the flag hasn’t exactly made hearts swell with state pride. One person said it resembled a toilet bowl brush. Others said it looked like one of the palmettos battered by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Still others compared it to the forlorn little Christmas tree from the 1965 television classic “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” Scott Malyerck, a political consultant who helped create the design as a member of the South Carolina State Flag Study Committee, said with some understatement that the tree had “not been uniformly loved by all South Carolinians.” “I’ve read hundreds of comments,” he said, adding that everyone seemed to have an opinion. “It’s hard to come up with a quintessential palmetto tree that everyone will be in favor of…”

McAllen, Texas, The Monitor, January 3, 2021: McAllen forms committee tasked with achieving ‘Tree City’ status

Residents can expect a greener McAllen in 2021. On Tuesday, the city announced via a news release the creation of the Keep McAllen Beautiful Tree Advisory Committee, which will coordinate Arbor Day activities, create a five-year plan to plant and maintain trees on municipal-owned properties, and promote public awareness and education programs. Established by Keep McAllen Beautiful and the city of McAllen Parks & Recreation Department, the committee will also be tasked with reviewing city department concerns relating to tree care. According to the release, the committee will submit an annual report to the McAllen City Commission, apply annually for a Tree City USA designation and develop a list of recommended native trees for planting on city properties…