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Phoenix, Arizona, KNXV-TV, Sept. 11, 2017: Tampa residents removing trees, not water, after Irma

In South Tampa, close to the Hillsborough Bay, people didn’t get the flooding that usually comes with heavy rain. Instead they are dealing with the aftermath of high wind; downed trees and branches. The sound of saws cutting through bark will become a familiar one in the next few days, as people try to get rid of the trees uprooted by Irma. Nancy Callahan might not be excited about the work, but would choose it over a different outcome. “My son and his three-year-old and his friend were up in the attic space which is a big big room and bathroom,” Callahan explains. “And if it had gone across the house they could’ve been killed…”

Chicago, Illinois, WLS-TV, Sept. 11, 2017: Tree cut down after Highland Park neighbor dispute

A Northshore family no longer has to worry about a giant tree looming over their home. Worried that a tree would crash through their home, the Tang family contacted the ABC7 I-Team after their neighbors refused to remove it and the city of Highland Park was unable to help much. Now they hope a petition will help others with similar tree troubles. Elizabeth Tang and her family are thankful for the sounds of chainsaws, but it came months after months of concern. Last spring, a storm caused huge branches of a Norway maple tree to damage the roof over their daughter’s bedroom. “The morning that the heavy tree branches fell on our home, some of the tree branches barricaded our home shut,” Tang said. “That tree branch could have easily snapped the main power line we would have been trapped in a burning house…”

Woman’s World, Sept. 11, 2017: The Ground-Zero tree that survived 9/11 is a reminder of American resilience

Sixteen years after September 11, the Twin Towers may no longer be standing, but in their place is a testament to the unbreakable strength of the human spirit: the Survivor Tree. To memorialize the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives that day stands a tree whose tale mirrors America’s own quest for peace after a tragedy.  “During the attacks in 2001, the World Trade Center, when it collapsed it feel on the tree and it decapitated it. When they were doing the clean-up at the World Trade, somebody noticed it amongst the rubble,” Richie Cabo, a horticulturist and manager of the Citywide Nursery said. The 8-foot tree, was moved to Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx, in a state that Robert Zappala, the former manager of Citywide Nursery, describes as “mortally wounded.” “All the upper branches on this tree was [sic] shattered and torn off,” Zappala says…

Waltham, Massachusetts, Wicked Local, Sept. 11, 2017: What’s turning leaves on Waltham’s trees brown so early?

The last weeks of summer were unseasonably cold this year, but why are some Waltham trees’ leaves changing colors or turning brown already? The cause has nothing to do with out-of-the-ordinary temperatures, and everything to do with a pair of diseases hitting invasive Norway maples, one of the more widespread trees in Boston-area suburbs, according to University of Massachusetts Extension School plant pathologist Nick Brazee. ″[Norway maples] were heavily planted in municipalities in and around Boston after Dutch elm disease spread through,” he said. “There wasn’t a lot of diversity in what could be purchased from nurseries at the time. Now, they are at an age where they look terrible.” Add disease to the trees’ already-ragged state and the impact of a disease becomes a lot more noticeable…

Greenville, South Carolina, News, Sept. 10, 2017: Hurricane Irma: Hundreds of tree crews staged, ready for storm cleanup

Tree crews from around the country were still arriving at the Georgia National Fairgrounds late Sunday in preparation for Hurricane Irma cleanup to the south. Hundreds of bucket trucks had parked in straight lines and were ready for deployment, likely after the storm has passed on Tuesday. One crew had used duct tape to send the storm a message: “Irma, here we come.” “It’s amazing what they have done in the last 48 hours,” said Philip Gentry Jr., agricultural director for the fairgrounds. “It’s a mini city over there.” Perry is a city about 30 minutes south of Macon and near the center of Georgia and two hour’s drive from the Florida line. Gentry’s team set up a temporary lounge in the goat and sheep lounge for the tree crews, complete with big-screen TVs…

Salem, Oregon, Capital Press, Sept. 10, 2017: Web blight emerges as concern in Christmas trees

A disease that infects Christmas trees erupted in some Pacific Northwest tree plantations last year, leading to tree loss and triggering a renewed round of research into better understanding the disease. The disease, web blight, has been a sporadic, but relatively minor problem in Christmas trees since it was first identified in the Northwest in the late 1990s. “I suspect that one of the reasons it was so severe this past year was because of all of the wet weather that we’ve had,” said Washington State University plant pathologist Gary Chastagner. “That provides an environment that is super conducive for spread of the pathogen…

New Orleans, Louisiana, Advocate, Sept. 10, 2017: Christmas tree farm hit by vandals in what owner says is a recurring pattern of crime

Clarke Gernon has seen multiple generations return as customers during the 35 years he’s been growing Christmas trees at Shady Pond Farm near Pearl River, but he’s also seen another kind of return visitor: vandals out to destroy his trees. Over the years, he said, the tree farm has been hit about 20 times by vandals, although no one has ever been arrested. Now, about three years after the last wave of vandalism, it’s happened again. Sometime over the Labor Day weekend, nine Carolina Sapphire cypress trees were destroyed by vandals who broke their trunks. The 3-year-old trees would have been harvested this year, he said, and amounted to an $855 loss. But for Gernon, the crime doesn’t only cut financially. The perpetrators are destroying a living thing, he said. To him, that’s just one step removed from harming an animal…

Pasadena, California, Star-News, Sept. 10, 2017: Fate of 227 Alhambra trees to be discussed Monday

The Alhambra City Council could decide Monday whether to allow a development that would see 227 trees axed. The owners of the Sunnyview Care Center — once part of the Scripps Kensington Retirement Community at 1428 S. Marengo Ave. — TAG-2 Medical Investments LLC, is proposing to raze 227 of the 268 mature trees on site to make way for a 126-unit condominium complex, a smaller skilled nursing facility, a medical office building and shops.  Without ordinances protecting trees or preserving historic resources, Alhambra had no way to mandate that the trees or chapel be saved, Councilman Jeff Maloney said in August. “The developer was under no legal obligation to preserve trees or chapel,” Maloney said. “All we can do is ask them to work with us at this point.” Maloney said creating rules for trees out of anger over one development would be irresponsible governance. He also said creating a new rule would be unfair to the owner of the property that’s still in the middle of its application process with the city…

Tallahassee, Florida, Democrat, Sept. 7, 2017: Cocktail of destruction: Hurricanes, termites and trees

Homes throughout Florida are under constant siege by termites, but homes are not the only target these pests are attacking. Termites are wood feeding insects that live in large colonies like honey bees and ants. In forests, termite colonies play an important role in nature by feeding on decaying wood found on the soil floor. In addition to feeding on fallen trees and logs in forests, termites will also feed on wood building materials found in houses. Termites have the potential to cause extensive damage to a house if given the opportunity. It is estimated that soil dwelling termites cause an estimated $11 billion in damages per year in the United States. Pest control companies have long been battling termites in Florida, but an invasive termite from Asia has been particularly troublesome, not only in Florida but the rest of the Southern United States. This invasive termite, called the Formosan termite, was first introduced into Florida at Hallandale Beach in 1981…

Tampa, Florida, WFTS-TV, Sept. 7, 2017: Tree damage! Here’s what you need to know before calling a tree trimmer

Tree trimming companies are busy taking down dead trees before the big storm. Stephen Nadeau has a dead tree in his yard. “I scheduled this for the next week or the week after and because of the storm they squeezed up in like two weeks early,” he said.  Jeff Trent is a certified arborist with “Tree Care by Robert Miller.” He says knowing the difference between the trees that help protect your home and the ones that could hurt it, is key. Some signs that your tree is dead and needs cut down are (1) brown leaves that don’t fall off; (2) big limbs that do fall off; and (3) ferns or mushrooms are growing out of the base of the trunk. The tree care company says there’s a lot of misinformation out there too…

Starkville, Mississippi, Mississippi State University, Sept. 7, 2017: Southern pine beetles threaten state’s trees

Mississippi is having a breakout of tiny beetles that use pheromones to gather sufficient numbers of reinforcements to overwhelm healthy trees. Current Mississippi Forestry Commission flyovers indicate nearly 5,000 separate Southern pine bark beetle outbreaks across the state. Outbreaks can range from just a few trees to more than an acre of infested and dying pines. Outbreaks are especially bad on national forestland, but homeowners and private landowners are also experiencing the problem. Thomas Legiandenyi, Mississippi State University Extension Service agent in Oktibbeha County, said he has had at least 10 calls in the last year from owners of small tracts of land who are wondering what is wrong with their pine trees. “My advice to homeowners is to frequently inspect your trees, not only for Southern pine beetles, but for any other problem on the trees,” Legiandenyi said. “If you have trees in your yard that have any disease, they become hazardous, as they could fall on your house, vehicles or even on people. Call a specialist when you see a problem…”

Chemical & Engineering News, Sept. 7, 2017: Trees with a probiotic boost clean up a carcinogen

Planting poplar trees that harbor a secret weapon—pollutant-busting microbes—could help clean up sites contaminated with the carcinogen trichloroethylene, a new study shows (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2017). In the first field trial of this approach at a Superfund hazardous waste site, poplar trees boosted by bacteria within their tissues brought groundwater concentrations of TCE to below the maximum contaminant level for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. TCE is used as a solvent and degreaser in industrial processes, and was recently declared a human carcinogen. It contaminates the soil or water of more than 1,000 Superfund sites around the U.S. Current methods to remove it from groundwater include sorbing it onto activated carbon or driving the pollutant out of water with a stream of air. But these methods are so expensive, says Sharon L. Doty of the University of Washington, that many site managers choose to monitor and isolate polluted areas instead of cleaning them up. Now she and her colleagues have developed a much cheaper approach. Using plants to soak up pollutants—a method called phytoremediation—can remove a variety of contaminants from soil and groundwater. Introducing symbiotic, pollutant-destroying bacteria to the plants has shown even more promise in lab tests, because carrying the bacteria seems to help plants stay healthier during the process and remove more pollutants. But so far, this probiotic approach has had mixed results in the field, sometimes because the introduced bacteria are outcompeted by naturally present soil microbes…

Phys.org, Sept. 7, 2017: Billions of dead trees force US fire crews to shift tactics

Vast stands of dead timber in the Western U.S. have forced firefighters to shift tactics, trying to stay out of the shadow of lifeless, unstable trees that could come crashing down with deadly force. About 6.3 billion dead trees are still standing in 11 Western states, up from 5.8 billion five years ago, according to U.S. Forest Service statistics compiled for The Associated Press. Since 2010, a massive infestation of beetles has been the leading cause of tree mortality in the West and now accounts for about 20 percent of the standing dead trees, the Forest Service said. The rest were killed by drought, disease, fire or other causes. Researchers have long disagreed on whether beetle infestations have made wildfires worse, and this year’s ferocious fire season has renewed the debate, with multiple fires burning in forests with beetle-killed trees…

See also US News, Sept. 7, 2017: State-by-state look at standing dead trees in Western US

Charlotte, North Carolina, WSOC-TV, Sept. 6, 2017: Arborist receiving abundance of calls on Irma’s impact on their trees

Local tree service companies say they have been inundated with calls from Charlotte homeowners concerned about the impact Hurricane Irma could have local trees. Arborists say many neighborhoods have a lot of old oak trees, the kind they say could become very dangerous during the storm. Certified arborist Tim Young remembers the devastation Hurricane Hugo caused in Charlotte in 1989. He’s concerned powerful Irma could do the same, and said people have been calling his tree service sharing their concerns…

Lompoc, California, Record, Sept. 6, 2017: Streetwise about street trees

There is no such thing as a perfect tree. All trees have foliage that, one way or another, eventually falls to the ground. All trees have roots that might try to displace something that gets in their way. Many trees are messy in bloom. Some make messy fruit. Except for palms, all trees have branches that can be broken by wind. Just about any tree can be blown over if the wind is strong enough. This is why the selection of trees that are appropriate to each particular application is so important. Finding trees that provide enough shade, obscure an unwanted view or perform any specific function is one thing. Finding trees that behave while performing their assigned tasks is something else. There are always compromises. A certain degree of bad behavior will likely be tolerated. Street trees for a park strip between the curb and sidewalk can be the most challenging trees to select. There are so many variables to consider. Many neighborhoods have saved us the trouble of selection by prescribing a specific tree, or maybe limiting the choices to only a few species, whether or not they are actually appropriate. Otherwise, we are on our own, to select whatever we like…

Manchester, Vermont, Journal, Sept. 6, 2017: Restitution ordered for cut trees

A judge has ordered an Arlington man who admitted to cutting down a property owner’s trees without permission during a logging job to pay $28,000 in restitution. Jason P. Morse was charged after he cut down nearly five acres of trees on a Farm Road property two years ago during a logging operation that crossed property lines. In June, Morse, 36, pleaded guilty in Vermont Superior Court Bennington Criminal Division to a felony count of unlawful taking of tangible property. He received a two-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay restitution.  Judge William D. Cohen said during a recent hearing that the $28,000 would compensate the New Jersey property owner for damages from the unlawful taking of trees: A $25,000 loss in value to the 11-acre parcel and $3,000 to clean up the property. Vermont State Police were called in October 2015 after a Farm Road property owner found a logging trail and several acres where trees had been cut down. A logging operation crossed over the property line by several hundred yards. Neighboring property owners had hired Morse to remove trees from their property; they told police they had become worried Morse was taking trees from beyond their property line…

Knoxville, Tennessee, News Sentinel, Sept. 5, 2017: TVA obscures tree-cutting compliance on website

What is a “prominent location” on the TVA website to post an injunction order from federal court as required in that order? This came from Judge Thomas Varlan on July 31 to TVA on a case involving its tree-cutting practices. On Aug. 30, TVA filed a notice of compliance saying the order had been published on its website. However, if you go to the main page of http://www.tva.gov, you will not find it. There are no clues on how to find it. One must guess and do trial by error to stumble upon the posted injunction. Only when one goes to the energy section, then tries the transmission section will one ultimately discover the injunction, which was embarrassing to TVA. This is the case where TVA’s tree-cutting practices under power lines were held to violate federal environmental impact review requirements…

Santa Barbara, California, KEYT, Sept. 5, 2017: Man electrocuted after falling tree hits power lines

A man is in critical condition after he was electrocuted by a downed power line in Santa Barbara. It happened on San Pascual Street and Sutton Avenue just after midnight Tuesday. Part of a massive ficus tree fell and took down a power pole. The power pole and tree caught fire. Power lines were arcing on the ground. “We heard a huge bang, and saw flashing lights,” said resident Amanda Schneiderman. “We knew where it was coming from.” Schneiderman was shooting video and taking pictures with her cell phone when she noticed someone was on the ground…

Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, Sept. 5, 2017: Too much soil or mulch at tree’s base can spell decay

Routine annual edging of tree rings often results in soil building up around the base of a tree, as soil that is cut from increasing the size of the saucer is put back around the tree year after year. Over time, the soil from the edging will mix with the mulch and build up around the trunk. Excess soil from the edging should be removed to prevent this from occurring. The situation is made even worse when a tree is planted too deeply. A tree trunk that resembles a telephone pole coming out of the ground is likely too deep. The trunk flare should be visible. The trunk flare is the point where the base of the tree widens out just before roots begin. In heavy clay soils, I prefer to plant trees high, with the trunk flare 2 to 4 inches above grade. Trees that are planted too deep quickly become buried with routine mulching and edging. Piling mulch up against the trunk of a tree is a bad maintenance practice and can cause problems for a tree. The landscape industry has a name for this practice: volcano mulching. The mulch will hold excessive moisture against the bark, creating favorable conditions for the bark to decay, which provides opportunity for fungi, bacteria and insects to get under the bark and damage the tree internally. The bark needs to be exposed to the air to function properly and protect the trunk. Excessive mulch also provides cover for mice and meadow voles, which can eat the bark and kill the tree as the flow of water and nutrients between the roots and canopy is blocked. Insects can also be attracted to bark that is softening or partially decomposing from excess mulch…

East Lansing, Michigan, Michigan State University Extension Service, Sept. 5, 2017: Why is my crabapple tree losing leaves?

Why are my crabapples looking so bad? This question has been asked repeatedly by folks contacting the Michigan State University Extension Lawn and Garden Hotline this summer. The fungus, Venturia inaequalis, known as apple scab, is a leaf spot disease that can cause serious leaf drop on susceptible crabapple trees. Lengthy periods of rain this past May provided conditions for apple scab spores to develop. Scab-infected leaves from the previous season, left on the ground around the tree are the source of fungal spores that can infect the crabapple the next spring. Spores from these old leaves are carried on air currents to new developing leaves. This primary infection produces olive colored spots on leaves. As the fungus grows on the leaves, new spores are produced starting a secondary infection of leaves and fruit. Damaged leaves become curled and yellowish with lesions, eventually turning brown. Heavy disease pressure leads to premature leaf drop. Fruit infected by apple scab develops raised scab-like lesions and severely infected fruit will drop from the tree…

Bennington, Vermont, Banner, September 3, 2017: Logger ordered to pay landowner $28,000 for stealing trees

A judge has ordered an Arlington man who admitted cutting down a property owner’s trees without permission to pay $28,000 in restitution. Jason P. Morse was charged after he cut down nearly 5 acres of trees on a property two years ago during a logging operation that crossed property lines. In June, Morse, 36, pleaded guilty in Bennington County Superior Court to a felony count of unlawful taking of tangible property. He received a two-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay restitution. Judge William D. Cohen said during a recent hearing that the $28,000 would compensate the New Jersey property owner for damages from the unlawful taking of trees: A $25,000 loss in value to the 11 acre parcel and $3,000 to clean up the property. Vermont State Police were called in October 2015 after a Farm Road property owner found a logging trail and several acres where trees had been cut down. A logging operation crossed over the property line by several hundred yards. Neighboring property owners had hired Morse to remove trees; they told police they had become worried Morse was taking trees from beyond their property line…

Brunswick, Georgia, News, September 4, 2017: Fight in Atlanta to keep historic trees from being chopped

Atlanta’s Grant Park is full of historic trees, but many near the main road are marked with orange Xs. Leigh Finlayson lives across the street from a row of trees on Boulevard Street, many of which are more than 50 years old, where a semi-underground three-story parking deck is planned. He’s leading the campaign to save some of the 131 trees on the chopping block by calling for the city of Atlanta to build a smaller parking deck and move it further inside the park. Finlayson has filed a tree conservation appeal with the city to save some of the trees, WABE Radio reported . “This is a late-life conversion, if you will,” said Finlayson, a criminal defense lawyer. “I was a Boy Scout as a kid, I spent a lot of time in the wilderness, but this was never my calling or mission until it just came to my front yard. Now it’s become a priority.” Finlayson questions why the parking deck has to be so large. “Why this deck has to be 1,000 spaces makes no sense,” he said. “I think there are good people that mean well here, but this is a no brainer. If it could be limited in a way, at least save the trees on Boulevard, I could probably stomach it better…”

San Mateo, California, Daily Journal, September 4, 2017: Fate of San Carlos eucalyptus trees sparks resident concerns

Whether a city ordinance aimed at preserving trees planted before San Carlos’ 1925 incorporation will continue to protect eucalyptus trees lining San Carlos Avenue between Sycamore Street and Dartmouth Avenue has sparked concerns among residents hoping the trees will be maintained as a city landmark and key part of the city’s tree canopy. After heavy storms this winter caused a eucalyptus tree to fall near Arundel Elementary School at 200 Arundel Road in January, city officials have been focused on studying the safety of 44 of the non-native tree species on the 1.3-mile stretch of the corridor. The Planning Commission is now set to consider whether the city’s founder’s tree designation, which protects 30 of the 44 trees from removal, should be removed from the city’s municipal code at its Tuesday meeting. City planner Lisa Costa Sanders said by removing the founder’s tree designation from the city’s code, officials would not be putting other protected tree species in danger of removal as they would be protected by their size and species. Though 30 eucalyptus trees are believed to have been planted in the late 1800s, prior to the city’s incorporation in 1925, four were removed in July after they were deemed to be dangerous with several others pegged as potential hazards, according to a staff report. “It’s hard to predict trees, you don’t know when they’re going to come down,” said Costa Sanders. “It’s not an exact science…”

Bits of Science, September. 4, 2017: Climate change & Anthropocene extinction 20: Amazon tree transpiration crucial to keep rainforest wet

The individual trees in the Amazon rainforest play a crucial role in keeping the rainforest intact. Not just because the trees together create the forest, but also because – together – they create the climate (through something called the shallow moisture convection pump). Take home message: in order to preserve the Amazon, deforestation really has to stop completely. A ‘meeting in the middle’ compromise does not work – as (amplified by global climate change) that promotes devastating droughts in the remaining part of the forest. As we’ve learned in this series, in face of the Anthropocene Extinction tree species are (probably) even more threatened than birds, amphibians and mammals. That naturally brings us to the Amazon – the largest terrestrial hotspot of biodiversity, and an ecosystem with huge significance to the global climate system. It is also the ecosystem with the largest number on endemic-only tree species…

New York City, Daily News, August 31, 2017: Woman hit by falling tree branch in Central Park sues city, says she has permanent injuries

An Upper East Side woman struck by a falling tree branch in Central Park sued the city Thursday, saying she has “severe and permanent” injuries. Heleyn Frumin, 64, charges in the suit — filed in Manhattan Supreme Court — that a plummeting tree limb fractured her ribs and injured her head, left elbow, right knee and right foot on W. 74th St. on July 18, 2016. Photos included in court papers show a massive, leafy branch roughly the width of a trash can lid strewn across a wide path in the park. Frumin declined to comment. A city Law Department spokeswoman said they are reviewing the complaint. The Central Park Conservancy declined to comment, citing pending litigation…

Kalispell, Montana, Flathead Beacon, August 31, 2017: Commissioner Mitchell pleads not guilty to destroying county-owned trees

Flathead County Commissioner Phil Mitchell pleaded not guilty to a felony criminal mischief charge after allegedly killing six cottonwood trees at a public park near his home on Whitefish Lake. Mitchell appeared at an arraignment on Aug. 31 in Flathead County District Court before Judge Heidi Ulbricht. Mitchell is scheduled to stand trial in January. As a condition of Mitchell’s release, county prosecutor Ed Corrigan asked the commissioner to stay out of the park near his residence until the case is resolved. According to court records, on July 11, a Flathead County Parks and Recreation Department employee found six dying or dead cottonwood trees in a half-acre county-owned park known as Lake Park Addition just south of Whitefish Lake State Park. The trees appeared to be girdled, a tactic that involves removing a thick strip of bark ringing the tree’s circumference, causing the tree to die…

Mother Nature Network, August 31, 2017: An ancient tree that stared down Hurricane Harvey has become an unlikely hero

While much of Texas reels from the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, one very old resident remains unbowed. In fact, while younger, lesser trees in Goose Island State Park were left shattered in the storm’s wake, a mighty oak, — affectionately dubbed “the Big Tree” by locals — remains unbroken. Earlier this week, Texas Parks and Wildlife posted a telling photo to its Facebook page. The scene — mulched, broken branches scattered everywhere — suggests a postcard from some arboreal apocalypse. And on the back of that postcard? Harvey was here…

Aberdeen, South Dakota, Farm Forum, August 31, 2017: Tree facts: Understanding Dutch elm disease

The American elm was formerly considered to be the ideal street tree because it was graceful, long-lived, fast growing, and tolerant of compacted soils and air pollution. The Dutch elm disease (DED) fungus was first introduced to the U.S. on diseased elm logs from Europe prior to 1930 and began devastating the elm population. It has now spread throughout North America and has destroyed over half the elm trees in the northern United States. The disease has been reported in all states except the desert Southwest. DED symptoms are the result of a fungus infecting the water conducting system of the tree. Once the fungus is established within a tree, it spreads rapidly through the water-conducting vessels. The tree forms gums clogging up these vessels causing the tree to wilt and eventually die. Infected elm trees show wilting, curling and yellowing of leaves on one or more branches and usually the sapwood has brown streaks. DED is spread by two kinds of bark beetles that attack elm trees: the smaller European elm bark beetle and the native elm bark beetle. They are elm pests because they carry the DED fungus as they move from infected breeding sites to feed on healthy elm trees. The numbers of the European species are reduced by cold winters while the Native species is more common and important in the spread of DED. Most emerging beetles feed on healthy elms within 1,000-1,500 feet of where they hatched. However, beetles may rise to altitudes of several hundred feet and are carried by air currents for many miles…

Victoria, Texas, Advocate, August 30, 2017: Tree trimming companies bogged down with calls

Joseph Forrest is from the Killeen area, but came to Victoria Sunday night to offer his landscaping services. As owner of the small business, Rock Bottom Landscaping, he has been driving around Victoria providing written estimates to customers on the spot. There are many Victoria area tree-service businesses available, but owners say they are inundated with calls because of the damage from Hurricane Harvey. Tree trimming and removal does not require any city permit nor does fence building. Many businesses welcome the help, but hope out-of-area businesses aren’t taking advantage of their customers…

Dayton, Ohio, WHIO-TV, August 30, 2017: Repeat walnut tree thief sentenced to more prison time

A Tipp City man already serving prison time and facing orders for restitution totaling more than $100,000 for stealing walnut trees in Miami and Greene counties was back in court Tuesday, Aug. 29, to face additional theft charges, this time involving trees owned by the city of Tipp City. Daniel Padgett, 29, pleaded guilty in Miami County Common Pleas Court to a fourth-degree felony theft charge for the theft of trees in the area of the Tipp City Nature Center near the Great Miami River. The theft occurred between Dec. 25 and Jan. 29, according to court paperwork. He pleaded this spring in the same courtroom to theft of walnut trees on private property owned by two individuals and the Tipp City Eagles and to selling the wood without permission. He initially was sentenced to $94,500 restitution and 60 days in the county jail but was returned to court the following day after a deputy found a bottle of urine taped to his leg while taking him to jail following the sentencing. He then was sentenced to nine months in prison…

Riverside, California, Press-Enterprise, August 30, 2017: Second tree with citrus greening disease found in Riverside

A second Riverside tree has been identified with citrus greening disease. Agriculture officials said they received notice of a positive test late Monday for an orange tree on a property adjacent to the one where the first tree to test positive for citrus greening was found earlier this summer. Both trees are near the 60/91/215 freeway interchange. The second tree was removed Wednesday. Citrus greening, which first showed up in Southern California in 2012, has decimated citrus groves in other parts of the country. It is carried by the aphid-like Asian citrus psyllid. Infected trees exhibit mottled leaves and fruit that is misshapen and fails to ripen, remaining green. The fruit also tastes bitter. There is no known treatment for the disease and trees usually die within three to five years…

Tucson, Arizona, Arizona Daily Star, August 30, 2017: How do you keep bark beetles from killing trees? Fool them with pheromones

Douglas fir trees that survived the recent Frye Fire in the Pinaleño Mountains near Safford are prime habitat for endangered Mount Graham red squirrels — but those trees are threatened by tree-killing bark beetles. What to do? Bring on the pheromones. Members of a national forest Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team plan to treat 300 acres of unburned Douglas fir forest in the fire area with MCH pheromone. MCH duplicates the natural pheromone emitted by male bark beetles — a pheromone that sends a signal to other male beetles that a tree is already taken…

Los Angeles, California, August 29, 2017: 2-year-old girl is badly injured when massive tree limb falls on Pasadena playground

A 2-year-old girl was critically injured Tuesday when a massive eucalyptus tree limb crashed onto a playground at a day-care facility in Pasadena, officials said. The incident occurred about noon, when more than a dozen children were playing outside at Linda Vista Children’s Center, said Pasadena Fire Department spokeswoman Lisa Derderian. Two other children, a 3-year-old and a 4-year-old, were treated for minor injuries caused by the fallen 20-foot tree limb. Parents were notified of the incident, and some picked up their children early, Derderian said. The school will remain open until 6 p.m. Social workers were on hand in case any children showed signs of emotional distress. Officials are investigating what caused the limb to fall. “We really maintain our trees on a routine basis, but Mother Nature sometimes has its own plans with things like this,” she said…

United Press International, August 29, 2017: Ancient trees reveal relationship between climate change, wildfires

New analysis of centuries-old trees in South America has revealed a strong correlation between wildfires and periods of warming. The history of Earth’s climate features frequent fluctuations in global temperatures, including many periods of warming. In modern history, periods of warming have occurred more frequently — interrupted by shorter and shorter periods of more and more moderate cooling. By comparing evidence of wildfire scarring among tree rings with climate records, scientists can tease out the relationship between fire and climate change. In the most recent study, researchers at Portland State University surveyed evidence of wildfire scarring among 1,767 trees spread across 97 South American sites, including trees from a range of ecosystems. The evidence revealed a strengthening relationship between periods of warming and wildfire frequency…

Treehugger, August 29, 2017: 11 facts about coast redwoods, the tallest trees in the world

Before the 1850s, coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) luxuriated amongst some 2 million acres of California’s coast, stretching from south of Big Sur to just over the Oregon border. One of three members of the Sequoioideae subfamily of cypress trees, the coast redwoods and their cousins, the giant sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum), hold the records for tallest and largest trees in the world, respectively. For thousands of years the people of the area managed to live in harmony with these ancient trees, understanding the importance of their unique forest ecosystem. And then the gold rush happened. With the arrival of hundreds of thousands of gold-seekers starting in 1849, the redwoods were doomed. Logged into near oblivion to keep up with the demand for lumber, today, only 5 percent of the original old-growth coast redwood forest remains, fewer than 100,000 acres dotted along the coast. The loss is heartbreaking … and gives all the more reason to sing the praises of these supertrees. And praise is easy, considering how spectacular they are. Consider the following…

Spartanburg, South Carolina, Herald-Journal, August 29, 2017: Tree of Heaven causes harm to native trees

The name is terribly misleading — if of heaven, how so bad? Originally from Eastern China, Japanese observed how fast the tree grew, especially on the ridges exposed to sunshine. They said it was growing to heaven. Local nurseries loved the name and it stuck — the most ridiculous marketing tag ever foisted on an unsuspecting public. Maybe we should stop using Tree or Heaven and call it by the scientific name Ailanthus altissima. For those of us who battle the tree three times each week, this is the “tree from hell.” The name makes it an uphill battle. Let’s move from the world of marketing fiction to facts. The Trees Coalition designate the Tree of Heaven as the No. 1 plague for native trees in Spartanburg. We are not alone. The Clemson Cooperative Extension and South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council (SC-EPPC) publish a pamphlet that lists various invasive species in South Carolina. They use a severity classification: Severe, Significant, and Emerging. Tree of Heaven (TOH) receives the worse rating: “Severe…”

Toledo, Ohio, Blade, August 28, 2017: Five-decade tree study continues in Toledo

Data was collected in Toledo again Monday for a little-known tree study that has been done in five Ohio cities the past 50 years. Called the Street Tree Evaluation Project, the ongoing study generates information every decade about the health and growth of city trees in Toledo, Columbus, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Wooster. In each city, select residences have been part of the study since it began in 1967. Once every 10 years, officials from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Ohio State University Extension revisit the neighborhoods to assess trees in the middle and to the left and right of chosen addresses. They measure diameter, height, and canopy while also making visual observations about how, if at all, neighborhoods have changed. They also take photographs and make general observations about tree health…

Dallas, Texas, KXAS-TV, August 28, 2017: Sleeping woman killed when massive oak tree falls onto mobile home

Hurricane Harvey has claimed another victim after a woman was killed Monday when a tree fell on her home as she slept, Montgomery County officials say. The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office said they were dispatched to a mobile home on the 17400 block of Louis Lane in Porter after a massive oak tree fell onto a home with a resident trapped inside. After walking through flood waters, deputies arrived at the woman’s home and spoke with her husband. He told police he was sitting inside the home when the tree toppled over. He said he screamed for his wife, who was napping in the bedroom, but that he was unable to get to her or to help her. The man said he then left the home to try to find help…

New York City, New York Times, August 28, 2017: Tree-eating beetles march north as winters warm

For lovers of the stately pine forests of the Northeast, sightings of a destructive tree-eating beetle in recent years have been nothing short of alarming. Now, new research from climatologists at Columbia University confirms what ecologists feared: Warmer winters mean the southern pine beetle is here to stay, and is set to march ever northward as temperatures rise. Historically, the tiny beetles, which starve evergreens to death, were largely unheard-of north of Delaware. The Northeast’s cold winters killed off any intruders. The winters are no longer cold enough. Over the last 50 years, average annual temperatures in the northeastern United States have warmed by about 1 degree Fahrenheit. But crucially for the beetles, the year’s coldest nights — which determine whether they survive the winter — have warmed by as much as 7 degrees Fahrenheit…

Springfield, Massachusetts, Republican, August 28, 2017: Springfield embarks on American elm restoration project with disease-resistant trees

The city Parks Department is partnering with two forestry and conservation groups on a project that is aimed at helping to restore American elm trees to the Connecticut River Valley decades after being devastated by Dutch elm disease. Approximately 130 disease-resistant elm tree saplings, now being grown inside University of Massachusetts greenhouses in Amherst, are slated to be relocated and replanted at the Forest Park nursery in September under the new elm tree restoration collaboration, officials said. Half of the trees, once mature, will be planted as urban trees on the streets of Springfield, and the other half will be planted in areas along the Connecticut River, said Christian Marks, a representative of The Nature Conservancy, one of the participating groups…

Lansing, Michigan, State Journal, August 27, 2017: McCarthy: Tax policy and trees go hand in hand

Fall will be arriving shortly. When it does, Washington’s attention will turn to overhauling the tax code. I will be glad to see a simpler, more streamlined tax code. But Congressional leaders, like my own Rep. Mike Bishop (MI-8), must consider how taxes impact Michigan’s family forest owners. Michigan counts on forests for clean air, clean water, $14.6 billion in economic revenue, and 154,000 jobs. What’s more, families and individuals own 45% of these forests, more than the government or corporations…

Seattle, Washington, KING-TV, August 27, 2017: 3 people, including infant, injured by falling tree in North Bend

A falling tree left three people, including an infant, injured at Twin Falls State Park in North Bend Sunday morning. Officials say a father, in his 30s, was in critical condition. His 16-month-old son, who was in a child carrier, was also in critical condition. “The father took the child off the carrier and handed it over to a different person, who then ran to the trailhead to get it to aid immediately while they were calling 911,” said Dep. Daniel Arvidson of the King County Sheriff’s Office…

St. Thomas, USVI, The Source, August 27, 2017: Senate holds bill aiming to protect heritage trees

A bill to protect individual trees with historic or cultural value was unanimously held Friday for further consideration and amendment. The vote on the bill, No. 32-0062, occurred at a hearing of the 32nd Legislature’s Committee on Government Affairs, Veterans, Energy and Environmental Protection. In addition to establishing a framework for the protection of “heritage trees,” the bill, sponsored by Senate President Myron Jackson, sets guidelines for the management of trees in public spaces, as well as some trees on private property, including those that pose a public hazard or nuisance. If passed, the regulations proposed by the bill will be added to the V.I. Code under the title “The Community and Heritage Tree Law of the Virgin Islands…”

Fall River, Massachusetts, The Herald News, August 27, 2017: Official: dead trees pose hazard for Westport drivers

A downed tree on River Road this past week totaled a BMW and nearly took the life of the driver, according to Planning Board member James Whitin. In response, Whitin brought a petition to selectmen with 35 signatures asking for more attention from the town toward removing downed trees, limbs or dead trees that have been destroyed by gypsy moths or other insects.  The latter issue has especially led to trees falling in the roadways, according to Whitin, who said River Road and the Westport Harbor area are especially susceptible to the problem.  “It’s causing a health hazard to motorists driving by,” Whitin said…

San Jose, California, Mercury News, August 23, 2017: Saratoga City Council rejects changes to tree regulations

Saratoga Planning Commission’s ideas for potential changes to the city’s tree ordinance were met with push-back from the city council and Heritage Tree Society’s Jill Hunter. Ultimately, the council decided that the city’s tree regulations are fine as they stand, but offered to implement some of the the commission’s ideas in other ways. City Arborist Kate Bear presented three of the commission’s suggested changes as part of Saratoga’s 2017 work plan: excluding certain species that are invasive (like blue gum eucalyptus), mark trees in the open when story poles are installed; and make requirements for tree replacement projects more consistent. Current requirements for replacing removed trees vary depending on whether the tree is removed in conjunction with a project or via tree-removal permit. Planning commissioners said it’s easier for residents to do the former, since they’re allowed to add to their homes and pay a fee in lieu of planting new trees…

New York City, WPIX-TV, August 23, 2017: Getting to the root of the problem: SI mom battles city over tree damaging her pipes

Giovanna Gambino says she loves her home on Ionia Avenue, but hates the city tree in her front lawn. “I’ve been battling the city for over a year. I’ve spent more than a thousand dollars on repairing my pipes,” Gambino said. “I’m done.” PIX11 reached out to the Parks Department and a spokesperson responded, “NYC Parks Forestry inspected this city tree today and spoke with the homeowner. We will be sending a crew to prune the tree for dead wood and branches within a week.” They also say the city does not reimburse home owners for plumbing repairs—tree roots cannot invade a pipe unless there is a pre-existing hole leaking water and sewage into the soil, which is illegal. Tree roots will follow water flow toward the source to exploit the nutrients…

Cortez, Colorado, The Journal, August 23, 2017: Centuries-old Ute Council Tree becomes unstable

A cottonwood tree that provided shade for the Ute tribes of western Colorado before the arrival of white settlers has grown rotten and unstable and must be trimmed into a memorial that recognizes its once-imposing stature. The Ute Council Tree in the western Colorado town of Delta is believed to be about 215 years old. But the cottonwood can no longer be considered safe, The (Grand Junction) Daily Sentinel reported. The Ute tribes whose forebears lived in western Colorado before 1881, when the region was opened up for settlement, will be consulted about what steps to take next, Jim Wetzel, director of the Delta County Historical Society Museum, said Friday…

Lincoln, Rhode Island, The Valley Breeze, August 23, 2017: Lincoln resident files medical claim against town, says tree fell on him

A Lincoln resident has filed a claim against the town after a rotting tree on town property allegedly fell on him while he stood in his driveway, causing several fractures in his leg. A claim from resident Roland Demers, filed through the Thomas E. Sparks Attorney at Law office, reads that on June 18, Demers was standing in his driveway on Preserved Arnold Court when the rotting tree fell on and injured him. The claim reads, “As a result, Mr. Demers suffered multiple fractures to his left leg which have required medical care.” The amount claimed is “to be determined upon the completion of medical treatment,” and the document states that the town is responsible for the expenses…

Charlotte, North Carolina, WCNC-TV, August 22, 2017: Tree crushes, severely damages home after being cut down, company silent

A tree cutting job went dangerously wrong on Tuesday morning. A company showed up to chop down a tree only to have it crash the wrong way onto a house. Someone was inside at the time. Luckily they weren’t hurt, but there’s significant damage to the home. Now, NBC Charlotte is looking into your rights as a homeowner. The tree that crashed through the roof looks like something you might see after a severe storm, but the homeowner blames a couple of workers next door. “It sounded like everything was crashing,” says Donita Hoffler, who was inside the home at the time…

Louisville, Kentucky, WHAS-TV, August 22, 2017: Against family’s wishes, tree coming down at site of deadly crash

It is a memorial in honor of the two lives lost a month ago. Eighteen-year-old Isaiah Basham and his 15-year-old girlfriend crashed into a tree on Herr Lane at Westport Village.”Touching on the tree, it feels like you are connected with him,” Imani Thompson said. Thompson comes to the tree to remember her lifelong friendship with Basham. But, the tree could be coming down soon.A spokesperson for Westport Village says its health and integrity were compromised after the crash.  Thompson says that’s not enough reason to get rid of it. “Of course, nobody will ever understand, especially people wanting to cut the tree down because it’s not their family,” she told WHAS11…

Organic Life, August 22, 2017: 4 things you need to know to plant a new tree

Planting a tree. It seems simple, right? For all intents and purposes your task is clear: dig a hole and stick your tree in it, leaf side up.  However, there are lots of insidious pitfalls to this process, all waiting to ruin this—your tree’s crowning moment. Planting your tree with care, properly, will set it up to flourish long years into the future. Here’s how to do it. More than the hole digging, more than the years of watering ahead, site selection is the single most important part of your tree planting story. Envisioning a beautiful blossomer smack dab in the middle of your hot and sweaty yard? Pick a tree that will luxuriate in that heat and not languish away. Similarly, if there’s a shady back corner of the garden you want to see lit up with fruits or flowers, choose something that can tolerate those conditions (magnolias can be great for part shade)…

Total Landscape Care, August 22, 2017: FreeWoodChips.net serves as a win-win for tree-trimming companies, customers

Jason Writz, owner of Mountview Tree Experts based in Fort Collins, Colorado, decided to kill two birds with one stone when he started up FreeWoodChips.net. As a tree-trimming company, Writz was often stuck with a truck full of wood chips that he would have to take to a dump site and pay to get rid of. However, he also knew that wood chips serve as a good organic mulch. Building his website from the ground up, he created FreeWoodChips.net, which connects tree services looking for locations to dump chips with homeowners in search of some fresh mulch. “Knowing the industry, tree businesses are always looking for convenient places to dump,” he told the Reporter-Herald. Writz has often been called by homeowners asking for any wood chips they happen to have and he says using organic mulch “is the single best thing you can do for your plants’ health…”

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, Pioneer Press, August 21, 2017: Another study finds earthworms hurting maple trees in Minnesota forests

Invasive earthworms from Europe that came over with early settlers and have been moving across North America ever since are causing sugar maple trees to decline in northern Minnesota forests. That was the conclusion of a research project published in the latest issue of the journal Biological Invasions — the second major project in as many years pointing to earthworms as the culprit in northern Minnesota forest problems. Scientists in the latest study, led by Michigan Technological University biologist Tara Bal, looked at plots of maples in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Northeastern Minnesota’s Superior National Forest and northern Wisconsin, and found maple trees experiencing “dieback” due to disturbances on the forest floor. That disturbance was worms eating the leaves. Dieback is when top branches that should be full of leaves instead had bare spots. That’s a sign of tree decline, where trees stop growing or die. In some areas, timber companies said maples were dying and becoming worthless even before they could be harvested…

Rochester, New York, Spectrum News, August 21, 2017: Majestic trees no longer line Kings Highway

More than 40 trees along Kings Highway in Irondequoit, all infested with Emerald Ash borer, were taken down by the town to the dismay and resignation of neighbors. Town Supervisor Dave Seeley says there just isn’t time or money for alternative methods to deal with the problem. The town has identified dozens and dozens of sick trees, and is chopping them down for safety and to contain the invasive species. “You do it with a heavy heart because these trees are beautiful and that’s why the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer is tragic really in so many sense,” said Seeley. “You never want to see them go but we always make an effort to replant them when they come down.” A stump grinder will do away with the stumps and roots, as every trace of the tree must go. Since it’s a county road, it’s up to the county to determine what if any trees will replace those fallen…

Free Thought Blogs, August 21, 2017: The intertwining of trees and crime

There’s been some very interesting research happening in Chicago, and it turns out that trees reduce crime. I don’t find this surprising at all, but I’m a “must be attached to the land” person. When your environment is bleak and desolate, you end up with bleak, desolate, desperate people. We need to be aware of our earth, we need to be connected to our planet. In urban environments, the best way to restore that connection is with trees. Yes, they are a long-term investment, but that’s good, because it means people are thinking the right way, generations ahead of themselves. In June, the Chicago Regional Tree Initiative and Morton Arboretum released what they say is the most comprehensive tree canopy data set of any region in the U.S., covering 284 municipalities in the Chicago area. Now, that data is helping neighborhoods improve their environments and assist their communities. “When we go to talk to communities,” says Lydia Scott, director of the CRTI, “We say ‘trees reduce crime.’ And then they go, ‘Explain to me how that could possibly be, because that’s the most bizarre thing I’ve ever heard…’”

Hillsboro, Ohio, Highland County Press, August 21, 2017: Do our offensive trees really need chainsaw therapy?

Last Friday, as is customary almost 52 Fridays every year, I was driving east toward Chillicothe on the George Washington Highway, otherwise known as U.S. Route 50… I was traversing the George By God Washington Coast to Coast Highway across these here United States. And I was duly offended. Why? Glad you asked. For one thing, it was the trees dotting the roadside landscape from west to east. There were white oaks, red oaks, black walnuts and yellow poplars. I may have even seen an Asian beetle or two. How, pray tell, after 241 years as a United States of America, did we get to this point where even our trees are defined along potentially racial divides? Forget about tearing down historic monuments that pay understandable homage to the Washingtons, Jeffersons, Hamiltons, Jacksons, Lincolns and Lees. We have a far more serious crisis with the naming of our national trees. And don’t even get me started on the Canada goose, that noble black-and-white brant (yes, it is black, and it is white) with its loud, trumpeting call…

Columbus, Ohio, WSYX-TV, August 20, 2017: Columbus man wants tree service to finish the job it started a month ago

A homeowner says a tree service didn’t finish a job after he paid most of the bill. Jeff Ludwig reached out to ABC6/FOX28 to get answers from Lumberjack Tree Specialist. We reached out to the company and a sales rep told us by phone he’d be out Saturday to finish the work. Ludwig says he isn’t counting on it. His backyard patio sits feet from an eyesore. “It’s not a very good table but I’d rather just have grass,” said Ludwig. Ludwig is stumped about what to do about it. “I probably don’t have the funds to get somebody else to come out and finish the job,” said Ludwig. Ludwig says he agreed to pay Lumberjack Tree Specialist $1,350 to remove a more than 20-year old silver maple from his backyard…

Charleston, West Virginia, WV Metro News, August 21, 2017: Contractors to handle tree removal on stretch of W.Va. Turnpike

As the West Virginia Turnpike gains in age, the highway is starting to experience problems maintenance crews have never had to deal with. The most conspicuous is taller trees starting to fall across the roadway. The problem is particularly pronounced in the narrow and remote stretch between the Mossy and Mahan exits of the highway. “During the original construction in the 50’s and in the 70’s and 80’s when it was widened those trees were removed,” said Turnpike Consulting Engineer Randy Epperly. “Now they’ve started growing back and in 40 years they’ve gotten to be substantial sized trees.” The taller trees have reached a point when they fall in a storm, they are long enough to cause an obstruction in the roadway. The concrete median barrier there has made missing some of them impossible and downed trees have been the catalyst for a number of lane closures this summer…

Seattle, Washington, Post-Intelligencer, August 20, 2017: Busted tree thief left receipt in stump-side Mike’s Hard pile

“To live outside the law, you must be honest.” That was Bob Dylan’s poetic-if-inscrutable advice to those disinclined to walk the line. Here’s some guidance that, for one Washington man at least, would’ve been a little more useful: To get hammered on Mike’s Hard Lemonade while stealing trees, you must not leave the receipt with your empties. Douglas fir poacher Richard Ivan Huggins learned that lesson the hard way after U.S. Forest Service rangers found his trash pile. Huggins, 32, left a Walmart receipt for his 12-pack of Mike’s amidst the stumps in the Olympic National Forest. Huggins, a longtime Olympic Peninsula resident, was spared jail and sentenced Friday to probation. He previously pleaded guilty to degradation of government property…

Chipley, Florida, Foster Folly News, August 21, 2017: August is tree check month – look for Asian longhorned beetle …

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) wants to remind the public that August is Tree Check Month. This is the best time to spot the round, drill-like holes made by the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), a highly destructive, invasive pest that destroys trees. It has not yet been confirmed in Florida but we are on the lookout for it.  Asian longhorned beetle has the potential to destroy millions of acres of America’s treasured hardwoods, including maple, birch, elm, willow, ash and poplar trees. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure to save infested trees. Infected trees will need to be removed to keep the beetle from spreading to nearby trees, as well as to protect homes and other personal property, since infested trees will die and can drop branches. The beetle is slow to spread on its own during the early stages of an infestation, so early detection and reporting is critical to containing it. People can also help by not moving firewood from areas quarantined because of the ALB, which can transport the beetle hidden inside to new locations…

Anaheim, California, Orange County Weekly, August 17, 2017: Tree of Life Nursery is saving our ecosystem one seed at a time

“The summer is the most unfavorable time to plant,” a young mom writes down in a small notebook as her pigtailed toddler stomps on the gravel between the white Canyon Snow Irises and the Asclepias speciosa. The latter is better known as “Showy Milkweed”—a common host plant for the endangered Monarch Butterfly, and a source of food, fiber and medicine regularly used by the Native Americans. “The soil gets too warm because of hot temperatures, and more often than not, the plants don’t survive after being transplanted into the ground at their new home,” says her friend who just finished speaking to an employee of the Tree of Life Nursery (TOLN), where the two women are shopping. “Apparently, planting in the fall is the best time for increased chances of germination if you’re growing from a seed. There’s also a better chance for survival after transplanting into soil during fall, too. Spring is the next best time to plant.” A young couple walks past Casa La Paz, a gift shop loaded with literature by naturalist authors such as John Muir and Henry David Thoreau, other educational books on California mushrooms and how to cook with honey, and open-air style paintings of California landscapes done by local artists. They walk along a dirt path and wander over a small bridge past a sign warning of the possible presence of rattlesnakes…

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, Sun-Sentinel, August 17, 2017: Rare Dragon Blood tree must come down, Fort Lauderdale told

It’s mystical, medicinal and beloved — and likely the only one of its kind in South Florida. The end is seemingly near for a venerable dragon blood tree in downtown Fort Lauderdale, across from city hall. The distinct tree’s origins are in Yemen but the city’s stately specimen stands on a grassy 3.5-acre city-owned lot on the west side of Andrews Avenue between Northwest Second and Fourth streets. After a large rotted portion of the rare dragon blood tree — so named for its crimson red sap — split and toppled in June, a city forester recommended its removal. But before that happens, David Crosby, a tree lover in Plantation, wants to adopt it…

Wonderful Engineering, August 17, 2017: These pictures show crown shyness – A natural phenomena where trees avoid touching each other

Humans may be the most intelligent of all species, but we cannot really deny that all forms of life are intelligent and it does not mean only the little animals and bugs but also fungi and plants. One of the most beautiful phenomena that you will witness in nature is the “Crown Shyness” that lets little cracks of light reach the ground through the thickest of forests because the tree tops refuse to touch each other. The phenomenon, also known as canopy disengagement, occurs mostly with plants of the same species when crowns do not touch each other, but it can also be seen among different species. Crown shyness was documented in scientific literature around the 1920s and then gave rise to many theories, but so far there is no agreement on what is the exact cause of this phenomenon…

Austin, Texas, KXAN-TV, August 17, 2017: Private property tree removal fees restricted in new law

Property owners now have added protections when it comes to removing trees in Texas. Gov. Greg Abbott signed HB 7 Wednesday, which creates limits on local tree ordinances. The goal is to restrict “overagressive” tree removal fees, and directs municipalities to offer private property owners tree planting credits to offset those removal fees. “Texas families that work hard for the dream of one day owning their own property should be able to do what they want with it,” Abbott wrote in a press release. Abbott vetoed a similar bill during the legislative session, and during the special session called for the Legislature to take up the issue again and axe nearly all local tree-cutting ordinances…

New York City, DNA Info, August 16, 2017: Central Park tree that fell on mom and kids was ‘decayed,’ officials say

The tree that collapsed in Central Park on Tuesday, nearly killing a mother and her three children, was rotted at the roots, according to the private company charged with maintain the park. The American elm tree toppled over as a “result of decay in the root system beneath the surrounding pavement,” according to the Central Park Conservancy, which is tasked with maintaining the park’s 20,000 trees On Tuesday, the tree’s upper branches crashed on top of 39-year-old Anne Monoky Goldman while her infant was strapped to her chest and she was pushing her two other young boys in a stroller on West Driver near 59th Street, officials said.  “The tree had been inspected annually over the last six years, most recently in November 2016, and there were no visible signs of decay or disease,” the Conservancy said in a statement Wednesday…

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tribune, August 16, 2017: Council strengthens roots of Penn Hills Shade Tree Commission

Penn Hills council has placed four members onto its newly formed Shade Tree Commission.  Mayor Sara Kuhn said that granting the appointments was a real pleasure.  “Any well-groomed community with trees and shrubbery, when people ride through, it just makes your community look so inviting, so warm and so taken care of,” Kuhn said before council voted to approve a list of appointees at a recent meeting.  Shade Tree Commission President and owner of Raborn Landscape Design, Kathy Raborn, found four other members in June when council approved of the commission. She presented the mayor and council members with the resumes of four Penn Hills residents. The members share a wide range of experience…

Only In Your State, August 16, 2017: Visit the world’s oldest tree stump at this national park In Nevada

The Great Basin National Park is home to one of the world’s oldest living tree: the Bristlecone Pine. Back in 1960, a researcher was studying the great Prometheus tree and after getting his sampling bore caught in the trunk, proceeded to cut down the magnificent tree, subsequently dated as being the oldest living organism in the world. Today, Prometheus—the world’s oldest tree stump—sits below Nevada’s Wheeler Peak. Prometheus is located in Nevada’s Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada by the Utah border. In 1960, a graduate student searching for the world’s oldest trees received permission to take a sample from Prometheus. His drill bore got stuck in the tree’s massive trunk, and, tragically, he cut it down to retrieve his tool. Upon doing so, he realized his huge mistake. After counting the rings, he determined that he had felled, perhaps, the oldest tree in the world. Prometheus was dated as having lived 4,862 years – longer than any other single organism…

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, KYW Radio, August 16, 2017: Invasive insect poses threat to fruit trees, grapevines

The spotted lantern fly is a growing threat to fruit trees and grape vines in the region. State officials are still trying to develop an effective way to stop it. The invasive insect is a large colorful bug that was first detected in Berks County in 2014 and can endanger apple and peach trees, grapes and hardwoods. “This insect lands on a tree and it inserts its piercing sucking mouth parts into the tree and it sucks out the juice of the tree,” said Amy Korman, from the Penn State Extension Service. Korman says in that process it lays a sticky substance that promotes growth of a black, sooty mold that can endanger a tree’s leaves. “We have some scientific evidence from Asia that it can kill plants by doing this,” she said…

New York City, Fox News, August 16, 2017: NYC mom critically injured while saving kids from falling tree

A New York City mom on Tuesday was hailed a hero after she shielded her three children–including a 41-day-old– from a massive tree that fell on them during a stroll in Central Park. Anne Monoky Goldman, 39, broke her neck and her son Grant, 2, suffered a fractured skull, The New York Post reported. A witness told the paper that if not for the mother’s quick action, all three children could have been killed. “It was terrifying,’’ Jamie Brown, 42, a Virginia tourist, told the paper. “You heard the tree fall and didn’t know what happened, and then you hear a baby scream.’’ The Post reported that the mom was walking along West Drive near West 62nd Street with her 1-and-a-half-month-old infant, James, strapped to her chest and Grant and his 4-year-old brother, Will, in a stroller when the towering elm toppled on them at about 10 a.m…

Dallas, Texas, KTVT, August 16, 2017: Texas Legislature OKs scaled-back anti-tree ordinance bill

The Texas Legislature has approved new limits on local tree ordinances, but they aren’t as sweeping as original proposals to virtually wipe out all such ordinances statewide. The House voted 119-23 on Tuesday to send a bill allowing property owners to plant new trees to offset municipal fees for removing old ones to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk. There’s no guarantee he’ll sign it, though. A similar measure cleared the Legislature during the regular legislative session, but Abbott vetoed it. He then convened a special session, asking lawmakers to axe nearly all local tree-cutting ordinances. The Senate passed a broad anti-tree ordinance bill, but eventually scaled it back enough for the House to accept. Abbott will have to call a second special session if he wants to revive the issue…

Bergen, New Jersey, Record, August 16, 2017: New Milford planners mulling fate of sycamore trees

Witnesses representing a developer that wants to build a bank and supermarket on the 14-acre Suez tract substantially finished direct testimony in front of the Planning Board on Tuesday, but a key component of the project remains unresolved. Board members must decide whether River Road should be widened to accommodate what some fear may be a significant increase in traffic. To do so would require lumberers to fell seven mature sycamore trees on the west side of the roadway. The trees tower over the street, providing not only shade, but a sense of splendor. “Honestly, it’s very likely that, if you don’t make this improvement today,” the developer’s attorney, Antimo DelVecchio, said to board members about widening the road, “you’ll never make it.” He added, “That opportunity won’t arise again. Traffic isn’t getting better…”

Napa, California, Napa Valley Register, August 15, 2017: Man in critical condition following tree trimming accident in west Napa

An employee of a city-contracted tree trimming service was hospitalized with serious injuries following an incident in west Napa on Tuesday, according to officials. The 24-year-old man, whose identity has not been released, was working on a neighborhood improvement project on Karen Drive when he was injured. The man was taken to Queen of the Valley Medical Center in critical condition, according to Napa City Fire. Napa Police advised residents to avoid Karen Drive between Sutro and Malone drives due to “police activity” via a Nixle alert at about 1:20 p.m…

Arlington, Massachusetts, August 14, 2017: Arlington Center residents fight to save tree from developer

Over the past decade, the neighborhood surrounding Webcowet Road has seen a boom in development. Five teardowns of single family homes have introduced duplexes and, neighbors say, put street trees in jeopardy. Developer Keith Lombardi is constructing another duplex at 40 Webcowet Road and has petitioned to remove a street tree from in front of the lot in order to build a driveway. The tree is an ash tree, according to the town of Arlington’s recent tree inventory, and is in good condition. “We went from walking down the street, a nice leafy street, and now we’re getting less and less trees. So when this one got posted, it was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” said Linda Annear, a resident of Webcowet Road. She and her neighbors are trying to save the nearly 60-year-old tree from being removed by Lombardi…

Pasadena, California, Star News, August 14, 2017: espite changes to plan, developer of Sunnyview Care Center in Alhambra still plans to remove hundreds of trees, angering activists

You’ve probably seen them in the past two months, at the intersections of Marengo Avenue and Valley Boulevard, Garfield Avenue and Main Street, in front of City Hall — dozens of residents carrying signs reading “Save the trees!” For two months, these residents have been pushing the City Council to block a proposed development that would see most of the Sunnyview Care Center — once part of the Scripps Kensington Retirement Community — razed so the property owner can build a 126-unit condominium complex, a smaller skilled nursing facility, a medical office building and spaces for retail. The first plan presented would have seen 229 of the 268 trees on the property at 1428 South Marengo Avenue removed, and a 91-year-old former chapel building demolished. Without ordinances protecting trees or preserving historic resources, Alhambra had no way to mandate that the trees or chapel be saved, said Councilman Jeff Maloney…

Phys.org, August 14, 2017: Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites

Trees have the ability to capture and remove pollutants from the soil and degrade them through natural processes in the plant. It’s a feat of nature companies have used to help clean up polluted sites, though only in small-scale projects. Now, a probiotic bacteria for trees can boost the speed and effectiveness of this natural cycle, providing a microbial partner to help protect trees from the toxic effects of the pollutants and break down the toxins plants bring in from contaminated groundwater. Researchers from the University of Washington and several small companies have conducted the first large-scale experiment on a Superfund site using poplar trees fortified with a probiotic—or natural microbe—to clean up groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), a common pollutant found in industrial areas that is harmful to humans when ingested through water or inhaled from the air. Their results were published in final version Aug. 11 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The successful field trial could be a game changer to quickly and effectively clean up Superfund sites around the country and polluted sites abroad that have high levels of TCE, the authors say…

Sacramento, California, KTXL-TV, August 14, 2017: Trees come down as crews clear brush around Lodi condominium complex

Fire safety is on everyone’s mind these days — including Union Pacific Railroad. The rail operator cleared out overgrown brush along its line in Lodi last week, but some neighbors say they went too far. Twenty-nine trees were cut down. Neighbors say the grass near their Mokelumne Village condominium complex say it was about time for the dry brush and grass to be removed because their homes would be in danger if a fire was sparked by a nearby train track. “They actually did a beautiful job cleaning it all up,” resident Nancy Campbell said. “The next day they came along and cut the rest of the trees down. All of them.” Six of the 29 trees that were cut down were redwoods planted in the 80s. Campbell said homeowners should have been notified the trees would be removed. A Union Pacific spokesperson told FOX40 the city requested they remove all fire hazards. The railroad determined the trees endangered homes…

Dave’s Garden, August 14, 2017: Trees’ vascular system: The big suck

Imagine being handed a very long straw, and told to lean out of a 35-storey building and drink from a glass on the sidewalk below. Sounds like a challenge? Well if you are a California redwood, it’s just part of everyday life. Reaching as much as 350 feet in the air, and so just as far down for water, these are the tallest trees on the planet. Even for relative dwarfs like western hemlock, or ponderosa pine, where the tallest are a mere 250 feet tall, the task is daunting. The basic problem is easy to see. We could take a tall tube, with the lower part standing in water, and attached the top to a pump to remove the air. Even if we create a perfect vacuum at the top of the tube, the water will rise a mere 33.8 feet, before stopping. This is because, with a vacuum at the top, the water is lifted by the pressure of the atmosphere, which at sea level is normally 14.7 pounds per square inch. That is sufficient pressure to lift water 34 feet up, but no more. So how do these majestic trees manage to draw water up to such extraordinary heights, despite this apparent limitation? Ever since botanists began to look at the workings of plants, this problem has been apparent. Following the discovery of human circulation, a similar concept was accepted for plants, although there was no physical equivalent of the pumping heart driving fluids around our bodies. As late as 1905, it was thought that plants had an active function – of an unknown nature – pumping water and sap around the tree. Professor E.J. Ewart, an Australian botanist, climbed 300-foot Australian mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) to measure the pressure inside branches. This tree rivals the Redwood for height, and Ewart concluded that the ability to lift water to those heights required living wood, and thus some activity by the tree that was only possible in life – the exercise of a ‘vital force’…

Austin, Texas, Native Plant Society of Texas, August 14, 2017: Legislative ax threatens to undo tree protections across Texas

In the wake of Governor Abbot’s agenda for one of the state’s most precious assets, city’s rights to their trees have been hanging in the balance. As you have probably seen posted this summer during this 85th Texas Legislature’s Special Session (week of July 14, 2017), Abbot’s “Ax Bill” as it has been referred, House Bill 70 (and Senate Bill 14), landed back in the house with neither side satisfied. Abbot’s agenda has been to gut, deregulate, and abolish cities’ ordinances for what property owners can do to act, or not act, on private land concerning trees, essentially at the risk of losing citizen’s say to what happens collectively to their city’s trees as a whole. Some recent articles say Abbot is mad because his current city’s ordinance in Austin is not in agreement with his pocketbook when he wanted to chop down a pecan tree on his more than two-acre property. A number of Texas municipalities who currently have the protection ordinances under their jurisdiction are having to fight back Abbot’s efforts to remove their power that is provided them by the home rule charter under the State of Texas. The ordinances vary from city to city. Some cover the types and size of trees regulated, including other conditions affecting property owners who want to remove trees…

Cleveland, Ohio, Plain Dealer, August 12, 2017: Look for laughter in the woodpile, not chainsaw danger (videos)

Had a little accident with the chainsaw over the weekend. “Little” is such an inappropriate word when referring to a tool that cuts through hardwood like butter. But there was minimal blood – just a few scrapes from a bark encounter – and a bit of vaudeville. I even laughed right after it happened. It wasn’t funny. The good things I learned: Read up on a power tool the first time you use it. Watch a You Tube video, something safety oriented. Have someone else there. They might talk some sense into you. Listen to your instincts. Especially when you find a black walnut limb resting against your house after a big storm…

Off The Grid News, August 13, 2017: It’s the quirky medicinal tree that pharmaceutical companies use

The tamarack tree is an oddity. It is the duck-billed platypus of the tree world, refusing to be solidly classified into any one category. Part softwood, part hardwood, and completely unique, the tamarack is a distinctive component of the northern forest. It’s useful for everyone from off-gridders to pharmaceutical companies and – not surprisingly – Native Americans made use of it, too. Tamaracks are native to North America, primarily in Canada and in the United States, from the northern Great Lakes region to the Northeast. It has more than one name, often even within in the same region. Its Latin nomenclature is Larix laricina, and it is also known as a larch — eastern, black, red or American — or a hackmatack. The word “tamarack” is said to be derived from a Native American word, but there are several theories as to the meaning, ranging from an Algonkian word meaning “snowshoe wood” to an Ojibwa word meaning “swamp tree.” Whichever origin is correct, both meanings are accurately descriptive of the tamarack tree…

Arlington Heights, Illinois, Daily Herald, August 10, 2017: Tree preservation stressed for proposed Libertyville subdivision

Planning for a small residential subdivision on the west side of Butterfield Road in Libertyville will proceed, but village officials made it clear that saving trees is a priority. Whether a developer guarantees to fix any future flooding that impacts neighbors is another issue to be addressed before officials grant final approval the proposed North Pointe Estates. Mount Prospect developer Paul Swanson wants to build 15 homes on a 7.6-acre triangular property bordered by Butterfield Road, the North Shore bike path just south of Route 176 and Victory Drive. Originated last fall, the proposal has been reviewed at four public hearings and at one point was recommended for denial by Libertyville’s advisory plan commission. Swanson proceeded to the village board, but the plan was sent back to the advisory group for revisions. Among them was dedicating a wooded area at the tip of the triangle furthest from Butterfield Road as open space. The area would be maintained by a homeowner association, but the village also wants it available to residents living outside the subdivision…

Binghamton, New York, WBNG-TV, August 10, 2017: Maple tree leaves falling, concerning Broome County residents

It’s something that can be seen happening all around Broome County. “The tree was green and then we got back from vacation in a matter of four or five days the leaves were already starting to turn brown and we were worried that we were going to lose the tree,” said town of Union resident Dave Tidick. Many people are noticing their maple trees are becoming bare, as the leaves turn brown and fall off. “We’ve had a lot of fungal disease and the trees, the leaves have become infected due to the wet conditions we had this spring,” said Extension Educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County Kevin Mathers. “Now those infections are getting severe enough that the leaves are falling off the trees.” Mathers said the good news is the maple trees aren’t dead. Mathers also said there is something people can do. “Rake up the leaves, try not to leave them there,” explained Mathers. “The real problem is if you leave the leaves on the ground all winter long, next spring those leaves are a source of infection for the disease which gets started early in the spring…”

Prior Lake, Minnesota, American, August 10, 2017: Area company removes tree for grieving Prior Lake woman in honor of late husband

Diana Kaiser stood in her yard at 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 10. She was wearing a fleece pullover — it was an unseasonably cool morning — and holding a cigarette loosely in one hand. As she watched, branches cracked, buckled and fell from the colossal silver maple, which has been feet from her house on Colorado Street since the day she moved in. She had been alternately laughing and crying all morning. After years of fear, sadness and desperation, the tree was finally coming down. “We were always worried it was going to fall,” she said. During the last big windstorm in Prior Lake, she’d watched the whole crown shake, like it was headbanging at a metal concert, and just hoped that it wouldn’t topple onto her son’s bedroom directly beneath it. For a long time, her husband, Byron, had wanted to cart the thing away. But three-and-a-half years ago, Bryon had been diagnosed with cancer. Before that, she’d been battling breast cancer herself, and before that diagnosis, her father had died. “So, things haven’t been real easy,” she said. A little less than a year ago, Byron died. For years, they’d been struggling with treatment, and with grief, and all the while, the tree had been put on the back burner. It was after he passed away that Diana decided something had to be done about the tree. It was a looming threat over her son’s bedroom, and the close-by power lines, but there was another reason besides that. She wanted to get rid of the tree for Byron…

Charlottetown, P.E.I, The Guardian, August 10, 2017: Several majestic, old elm trees in Charlottetown are receiving potential life-saving treatment

The city has been inoculating trees since 2010 but has switched this year to the fungicide Arbotetc 2020-S, which is believed to be more effective than the previous product the municipality had used, says Beth Hoar, Charlottetown’s parkland conservationist. Morgan Laverty, a Dutch elm disease technician, was treating an American elm tree on Hillsborough Street Thursday morning. The tree, which stands about 85 feet tall and is at least 100 years old, is the eighth tree Laverty has treated this year in Charlottetown. He is looking to do one or two more this year, notes Hoar. She says the treatment lasts for three years. The city plans to treat another set of elm trees next year at an average cost of $360 per tree…

Washington, D.C., Times, August 9, 2017: Officials want help watching for invasive tree-eating beetle

Have trees around your house? Take a few minutes to check them for an invasive beetle. The request comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which has designated August as National Tree Check Month. In Michigan, officials are primarily worried about the Asian longhorned beetle. The distinctively large, shiny black beetles have random white blotches or spots. They turned up in the U.S. more than 20 years ago and likely came from Asia in wood packing materials. They haven’t been spotted in Michigan but have been found in neighboring Ohio. The beetle eats its way through the insides of trees, damaging and often killing them. It prefer maples but also will infest other hardwoods…

Walla Walla, Washington, Union-Bulletin, August 9, 2017: Oregon company that failed to trim tree pays for fatal crash

A Portland industrial shop has been court ordered to pay nearly $300,000 for failing to trim tree branches that blocked a stop sign and contributed to a fatal car crash. In June 2013, driver Jason Rodriguez ran the stop sign and ended up crashing into cross-traffic, killing one of his passengers, 33-year-old Michael Dominguez. The Oregonian/OregonLive reports Dominguez’s family sued Rodriguez for poor driving and Portland Engine Rebuilders for failing to keep the leaves on a tree bordering its property from obscuring the stop sign. A jury ordered Rodriguez to pay $678,000 and the industrial company to pay $291,000 to the family…

Lubbock, Texas, KFDA-TV, August 9, 2017: BBB alerting residents of tree-trimming scammers

Homeowners in need of yard work following recent storms in the area are being targeted by scammers.  According to the Amarillo Better Business Bureau, scammers target homes after storms because it’s when people need help in their yard the most. The Better Business Bureau has received several calls from residents who paid workers to trim their trees. They say they took their money and never finished the job.  A local landscaping company says there are some red flags to watch for before hiring someone to help with your yard. “You just want to watch out for people looking to receive your money upfront before any work is done. [Also] any individuals in unmarked cars, unmarked clothing,” said Tye Debord of Krause Landscaping…

DieHard Survivor, August 9, 2017: 15 Types of trees to never have in a front or backyard

The trees covered below are not just trees to avoid if you are planning your homestead or survival location layout; they all possess either a very shallow root system, produce toxins to other plants, attract pests, suck up a disproportionate amount of water/nutrients or have very weak wood. If they already are present, you should consider removing them or altering your plans to accommodate for their weaknesses…

Hilton Head, South Carolina, Island Packet, August 8, 2017: A tree limb fell and injured a child in Palmetto Dunes Resort. His family has filed a lawsuit

The Palmetto Dunes Property Owners Association should have known a tree in its resort posed a danger before a limb broke off and fell on a 10-year-old boy, resulting in over $285,000 in medical expenses, a lawsuit alleges. The suit, filed July 28 in Beaufort County Circuit Court, said the son of Christopher and Heather LeCroy, who are residents of Pickens County, was walking with a friend along a leisure path in Palmetto Dunes Resort in April 2014 when a loblolly pine tree limb fell about 50 feet, landing on the child’s buttocks, back and lower portion of the right leg. The lawsuit claims that “one could clearly see a great deal of evidence of prior limb breakage,” and a “reasonable inspection” of the tree would have caused the Palmetto Dunes Property Owners Association to notice a 20-foot “split” in the trunk of the tree along with other limb breakage “directly above the leisure pedestrian pathway.” Andrew Schumacher, the association’s chief executive officer, said this week he could not comment on the suit. The attorney for the LeCroys did not immediately respond to multiple requests for comment…

Ecosalon, August 8, 2017: You’re not the only one with insomnia: City trees don’t sleep well, either

Streetlights and everything else that makes a city hustle and bustle are messing up trees’ sleep cycle. Peter Wohlleben, author and forester, wrote a book,The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World”, about this disturbing modern reality. Wohlleben has studied forests since 1987 and has built on his knowledge ever since. The book, which came out in 2016, isn’t the only bit of literature to discover this finding. For example, a recent (2016) European Commission funded study published in the Journal of Ecology found that artificial light affected when trees’ spring buds burst, leaves’ coloring, and when trees shed leaves. “[The] study concluded that changes in trees’ annual rhythm of producing leaves and blossom attributed to artificial light ‘may have significant effects on [their] health, survival, and reproduction’”, The Times of London reports…

Charleston, South Carolina, WCBD-TV, August 8, 2017: Mount Pleasant Town Council to discuss tree removal following routine utility limb cutting

Mount Pleasant Town Council will discuss an issue regarding routine tree trimming to keep limps away from power lines. This discussion comes after several people complained to the council, and the News 2 I-Team, about the way the contractors cut the trees. During a full council meeting Tuesday night, members will discuss and vote on a new ordinance that would allow home owners to remove the trees they believe are damaged without the required mitigation. That means the homeowner will not have to replace the tree. In June, Leigh Rowe was one of the Mount Pleasant residents who complained to the I-Team about the tree cutting. SCE&G contracted crews to perform the maintenance, but she was not happy with the way contractors performed the work. “The tree guys showed up and just kind of chopped down the middle of it,” Rowe said…

TD World, August 8, 2017: Crews track danger trees in new mobile application

Every electric utility across North America has one central mission — to keep the lights on for its customers. Overgrown vegetation and danger trees, however, can inflict unplanned outages for line crews. Case in point: the 2003 blackout can be traced back to vegetation management issues on a transmission right-of-way (ROW) in Ohio. Because of this event, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) developed a special focus on transmission vegetation management and its impact on reliability. Utilities responded to this focus by redoubling their on-ROW vegetation management efforts and implementing technologies that enhance their ability to detect and mitigate so-called danger trees at and beyond the edges of transmission ROW. The New York Power Authority (NYPA), for example, has implemented an aerial mapping technology called light detection and ranging (LiDAR) that can identify vegetation, including danger trees that could pose a danger to transmission lines. NYPA, which manages 1400 circuit miles of transmission lines, has been using LiDAR to survey its facilities for years, but it just recently started including danger trees in its measurements. In the near future, line crews will start using an advanced mobile application to pinpoint which LiDAR-identified trees off a ROW need to be cut down…

Red Bank, New Jersey, Red Bank Green, August 8, 2017: Fair Haven: Outcry halts tree cutdown

Fair Haven’s elected officials faced a storm of criticism by residents Monday night over a plan to cut down 10 mature trees alongside the borough’s main ballfields. By the end of the semimonthly council meeting, the governing body had decided to put the plan on hold and “go back to square one,” in the words of Mayor Ben Lucarelli. The plan, which came to widespread attention in recent days and was scheduled to begin August 15, called for removal of the sweetgum trees, which line Third Street and Cedar Avenue, to clear the way for a cinder walking path and other improvements around the Community Center Ballfields. The trees, some of which are 50 feet tall, were to be replaced by a dozen saplings. Outraged homeowners in the area complained they’d gotten no notice of the plan, whose details had not been made generally known as it made its way through committees toward a funding vote. Even the Shade Tree Commission was caught off guard, said two members of that advisory group…

Environment Guru, August 7, 2017: How to identify tree ailments 

Plant diseases can cause a loss in yield of the crop or damage to the aesthetics of the plant itself. To make matters worse, these issues can also weaken the integrity of a tree. In this instance, hazardous situations may occur in which property damage or even serious bodily injury could result from falling branches or even the toppling of the tree itself. In order to avoid such hazards, it is important that you are able to recognize the telltale signs of common tree diseases so that you may take the necessary actions to remedy the issues. Disease outbreaks are often seasonal, regional, and species specific. The following list are some tree ailments that you may encounter, but infestations and disease will vary from location to location. AnthracnoseAnthracnose is one of the leading plant diseases in trees and shrubs. This condition stems from a fungus that attacks the leaves, twigs, flowers, and fruits of several different species. It is commonly found throughout North America, with sycamore and flowering dogwood being the most heavily impacted species. The symptoms of this condition vary by the pathogen as well as the host species. Nonetheless, some of the common indicators include premature leaf defoliation and twig blight that presents as witch’s broom – a deformity that causes shoots to densely grow in one spot…

Technology.org, August 7, 2017: What’s killing trees during droughts? Scientists have new answers

As the number of droughts increases globally, scientists are working to develop predictions of how future parched conditions will affect plants, especially trees. New results published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution by 62 scientists, led by Henry Adams at Oklahoma State University, synthesized research from drought manipulation studies and revealed the mechanisms by which tree deaths happen. “Understanding drought is critical to managing our nation’s forests,” says Lina Patino, a section head in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Earth Sciences, which co-funded the study through its Critical Zone Observatories program. “This research will help us more accurately predict how trees will respond to environmental stresses, whether drought, insect damage or disease.” Adds Liz Blood, director of NSF’s MacroSystems Biology program, which co-funded the research, “Droughts are simultaneously happening over large regions of the globe, affecting forests with very different trees. The discovery of how droughts cause mortality in trees, regardless of the type of tree, allows us to make better regional-scale predictions of droughts’ effects on forests…”

International Business Times, August 8, 2017: Couple buy San Francisco street, trees and all, for $90,000

Well, if you can’t afford to buy a house in a pricey neighborhood, you should buy the whole street. A $14-a-year tax property bill not paid for three decades, resulting in a wealthy neighborhood owing the city $994 in back taxes, has allowed Tina Lam and Michael Cheng to make a mind boggling investment. The couple paid $90,000 for Presidio Terrace, a San Francisco street in an upscale part of town, where houses frequently sell in the $35 million range. The deal includes the long block street and sidewalks, well-coiffed garden islands and palm trees. The posh enclave contains a total of 35 mansions, a gated and guarded community at the end of Washington Street, just off Arguello Boulevard and down the hill from the Presidio – a park that is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area…

Plano, Texas, Leader, August 6, 2017: Flower Mound releases information on tree trimming

Oncor will continue trimming trees away from the power lines along Old Settlers, Cross Timbers and McKamy Creek roads. Other areas Oncor has targeted for trimming include Wichita Trail as well as portions of Hide-A-Way Lane, Peninsula Drive, Quail Run and Beckworth Drive. Crews have already trimmed the trees in the Morriss and Cross Timbers Road area since starting earlier this week. An arborist is part of the crew trimming trees to ensure the trees are being cut properly. Electric utilities strive to provide safe and reliable service, making it necessary to manage trees near power lines and Oncor has the legal right to maintain its equipment. This includes entering private property to trim trees. By Texas law, only professionals who are authorized by the wires companies are allowed to prune or remove trees closer than 6 feet to high voltage power lines. Always call your wires companies for assistance. Here are some quick facts about why Oncor conducts periodic tree trimming:  Oncor typically trims the trees away from the power lines once every five years. It has been seven years since crews were in Flower Mound…

San Francisco, California, Chronicle, August 6, 2017: Oak tree limb snaps, injures 3 at Atherton picnic

Minutes before a huge limb snapped off a heritage oak tree on Menlo College’s Atherton campus Saturday, dozens of adults and children sat under its shade. They were there for a company picnic with Riverbed Technologies, a cloud business based in San Francisco. The afternoon was bright and breezy, and tables filled with food and an inflated bounce house were set up on the college’s quad. But when the 50-foot-long branch snapped at 2:22 p.m., only a half-dozen people were hit.  Miraculously, Fire Department officials said, only two adults and a toddler sustained minor injuries. “This whole thing is unbelievable,” said Menlo Park Fire Chief Harold Schapelhouman. “It’s amazing there weren’t more people injured. There were 300 people at this event. It could have been much, much worse…”

Bergen, New Jersey, Record, August 6, 2017: Tree falls, killing North Haledon boy, neighbors say

A 4-year-old boy was killed Saturday afternoon when a tree fell on him, neighbors and friends of the family said. News 12 reported that the boy had been driving a toy electric car near his home on Lotz Street. North Haledon Mayor Randolph George declined on Sunday to comment or even confirm that the incident had occurred. He added that he had instructed borough police not to comment. The incident stunned members of the small, tight-knit community. Some neighbors declined to comment, and one said she was too upset to talk about it. Resident Joe LaBarck said he was at home when he heard about the incident. “You don’t expect to see something like this in a small, tight-knit community,” LaBarck said. “We’ll get through it. But it will hurt…”

Florence, South Carolina, SC Now, August 6, 2017: Tony Melton: Trees usually die a slow, agonizing death

After watching a lifetime of court dramas, I know just enough about the law to be dangerous; however, I do know there is such a thing as a “Statute of Limitations,” and after a certain period of time, you cannot be held responsible for certain crimes. Many construction people must act with a statute of limitation mind set when it comes to saving established trees around their construction sites. First of all, the way we recommend to save a tree on a construction site is to build a fence around the tree and prevent any type of construction activity inside the fenced area. The distance the fence must be placed from the trunk of the tree will astound most people. It is at minimum the height of the tree from the trunk, and if the tree is really important, twice the height of the tree from the trunk. We recommend this because the roots of a tree can go outward once and up to twice the height of a tree. Next, if an irrigation system, electric line or any type of underground line must be installed, either do not go within the fenced area, or dig the trench like a spoke of a wheel toward the trunk but never closer than six feet of the trunk…

New York City, Daily News, August 3, 2017: Teen dancer sitting in hammock crushed by falling tree in Kentucky backyard

A teen ballet dancer sitting in a hammock was killed when a tree in a Kentucky backyard collapsed and crushed her. Michelle Chalk, 15, was spending time with a friend outside a home in Ford Thomas Tuesday night when one of the trees holding up the hammock she’d been sitting in gave way. First responders found Chalk dead on the scene minutes after the accident. A friend who was sitting with her at the time was not seriously injured, according to the news station. The tree was described as old, but it was not immediately clear what caused it to fall. Authorities ruled her death an accident. Chalk, who was expected to start classes at Highlands High School later this month, was a well-known dancer with the Cincinnati Ballet…

Jackson, Tennessee, Sun, August 3, 2017: Is your tree problem terminal? Diagnosis is key

The leaves are browning, or already dropped from the tree. A call is made to the county agent who asks for photos, and gets closeups of the browning leaves. Argh! This tells little — and the photos are sent to me, and I’m supposed to know what to do. Sometimes I am tempted to just name a product that is cheap and easy to spell and can be found at the first store entered. It should take just one sprinkle or spray and the problem goes away forever and ever. That’d be nice, but I actually care about putting out good information, so I undertake the work at hand. I have questions. Is it a recently established planting? Planted this year, even last year, it is still getting established and could be several things. It could have been planted too deep, or plants stuck in the ground without loosening roots to help them get integrated into the soil. It could be the wrong site for the plant, and it has decided to give up. Maybe it was not watered enough, or too much. If it is a long established plant going suddenly into decline, that’s a new set of questions. I first try to rule out abiotic factors — those things that could have “happened” to physically injure the plant or change its environment. No? Then insect damage is next in the line of possibilities to be investigated, and lastly comes disease…

Indianapolis, Indiana, Star, August 4, 2017: Dr. Dirt: Lightning strikes can cause varying damage to trees

Dear Dr. Dirt: During one of the many recent rain storms, lightning struck an oak tree in the yard, tearing out a strip about three inches wide and two inches deep from near the top to the bottom of the tree. The wound has been covered with tree dressing, which blends in well with the bark. Is there anything else to be done? — Wayne, Indianapolis

Dear Reader: Lightning can beautiful to watch during the night, but it can be dangerous and deadly. Summer is the time when we enjoy the outdoors until a rain storm comes along. Then, it is only natural to take cover under a tree or trees when golfing or picnicking. Lightning tends to strike the highest point (trees). Thus, indoors is the safest shelter. The damage to trees varies greatly. They can be reduced to splinters or show no obvious damage. If your homeowners insurance covers trees, it would be wise to send them a letter documenting the date the tree was struck. If the tree eventually dies, the insurance company will check the local weather records to make sure there was a storm. Last summer, a neighbor’s tree was hit by lightning and pieces of bark were found a block away. This year, the tree appears to have survived and looks normal. In your situation, just wait and see what happens…

Gilroy, California, Dispatch, August 3, 2017: An effort to stop Gilroy from cutting 235 trees is postponed

A Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge shot down a Gilroy woman’s attempt to prevent the city from cutting down 235 trees, which she says are healthy. Judge Helen Williams sided with the city, saying that because some trees have fallen and damaged property, the city should be allowed to cut trees it deems dangerous. Gilroy resident Camille McCormack invested $15,000 of her own money to fund a suit asking the city to stop cutting the trees. She hired an arborist, Moki Smith, to assess the trees the city was planning to fell and he found that only one was truly dead. The others could be revived with watering, fertilizer and trimming, he said. However, that didn’t weigh in the judge’s decision. Williams agreed that cutting the trees could do irreparable harm to McCormack and the city, however, she didn’t grant the restraining order because she didn’t think McCormack could win the case in court. It’s a decision that shows how difficult it can be to get a preliminary injunction, said McCormack’s attorney, Laura Beaton…

Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, August 2, 2017: Elgin city worker relocates honey bees from storm-damaged tree

Elgin City Engineer Ron Rudd used his skills as a home beekeeper to help save bees that were living high up in a tree on Elgin’s northeast side until a storm severely damaged the insects’ home. “We knew the tree was hollow and held bees,” Rudd said. “Lo and behold, with the storm, a branch broke off and got hung up in utility wires (exposing the colony),” Rudd said. Rudd said he knew about the hive because a resident called the city’s 311 department a few years ago about the tree in a city parkway after noticing the bees and hive above. “She understood the issue with honey bees, and as long as they weren’t stinging anyone she was fine with them being there,” Rudd said…

Wichita Falls, Texas, KFDX-TV, August 2, 2017: Tree advocates say legislation could put Texas trees in danger

Tree advocates from all across Texas met at the Capitol today to stand against legislation that they say puts trees in danger. This after Governor Abbott called for legislators to consider laws that would pre-empt all local tree ordinances to protect property owners’ rights. “There are at least, as we’ve counted, over 110 ordinances across the State of Texas. I think a lot of people think that this is an Austin thing, but it’s places like Weatherford, Allen, Orange, Mineral Wells, we found this week, all across the State of Texas. So this isn’t a Republican, Democrat, Liberal, Conservative, big city or small thing, this is about common sense protections,” Andrew Dobbs, Legislative Director, Texas Campaign for the Environment. Several people delivered copies of the books to House members encouraging them to vote against laws that would allow the state to control tree ordinances, specifically House Bill 70…

Richmond, Virginia, WTVR, August 2, 2017: Northside homeowner wants city to pay for tree removal

A Richmond woman said a dead tree branch broke off over the weekend and totaled her car. Lauren Rice believes when it comes to her car she just can’t win. These pictures show her  brand new Audi in 2013, with an alleged $17,000 in damage after a branch from this tree near her north Richmond home fell on it. She said she didn’t know to contact the city to file a claim. A year or so after,  Rice said she contacted the city to request an assessment on the tree that she suspected was dying. She still doesn’t know if they city came by for that.  Then last week,  another branch from the same tree fall on her car again…

Phys.org, August 2, 2017: Tree-of-heaven’s prolific seed production adds to its invasive potential

Tree-of-heaven—or Ailanthus—is an invasive triple threat, according to a team of plant pathologists. The species produces seeds early in its lifespan, tends to make millions of viable seeds during its life, and continues to produce seeds for decades and, in some cases, for more than a century. In a study, researchers, who report their findings in the current issue of Forests, found that an Ailanthus tree that lives around 40 years can produce approximately 10 million seeds during its lifetime, while Ailanthus trees that live over a 100 years can produce about 52 million seeds. Little was known about the actual lifespan and seed viability—the percentage of seeds that germinate—of Ailanthus, a species that is now considered a growing invasive threat in numerous spots in the United States, according to Matt Kasson, assistant professor of forest pathology, West Virginia University, who began his study of Ailanthus at Penn State. He added that the species’ prolific ability to reproduce is thought to be key to its invasive success. “What really got us interested in the seed production of these trees is trying to determine what is the cumulative impact of Ailanthus—what’s the cumulative seed production and output that could eventually lead to secondary invasions,” said Kasson. “Knowing how many seeds can be produced is really only half the story. It’s important, but we needed to know something about viability of the tree because if a tree was producing a million seeds, but only 3 percent are viable, then it doesn’t pose as much of a threat…”

Washington, D.C., Post, August 1, 2017: Pepco sent a contractor to prune trees. Residents say it butchered the neighborhood.

When the bright orange trucks returned to her neighborhood of Kemp Mill Estates, Maria Honeycutt knew to expect weeks of tree-trimming. The familiar vehicles were manned by Asplundh Tree Expert and contracted by Pepco to cut down branches and limbs snaking through overhead power lines. Honeycutt, 43, had “applauded” past efforts by Pepco to reduce power outages in Silver Spring, especially after her family had lost power for five days following the 2012 derecho, one of the most destructive thunderstorms ever to sweep through the D.C. area. But this time, Honeycutt was shaken by the “butchering” of her neighborhood’s maples and oaks. Workers cut down healthy branches nowhere near the power lines, she said, but ignored dead limbs hovering dangerously over the sidewalk. A geologist who has lived in her home for 12 years, Honeycutt sternly challenged the Asplundh workers on which limbs they were pruning until the crew summoned its cherry picker down from above and moved to the next house…

Battle Ground, Washington, Reflector, August 1, 2017: Heritage tree protection, tiny homes for Ridgefield discussed

Changes to policy regarding protection of designated heritage trees and the construction of tiny homes in Ridgefield were chief among discussions with the city council last week, though a final vote on both issues has been postponed until the finer points get sketched out. Ridgefield’s City Council discussed the approval of the two ordinances during its public meeting July 27. Although originally up for a final vote at the meeting, City Manager Steve Stuart said after public hearings on the ordinances “it became clear to staff that we were not hitting the mark … with the proposed ordinance(s) for what the council had asked us to look into.”  Given that, no vote was taken, but several key focuses for both ordinances were addressed. The heritage tree ordinance would require a permit from the city to remove designated trees, according to documents provided to the council…

Lincoln, Nebraska, Journal-Star, August 1, 2017: Fast-spreading trees a headache in Nebraska, nearby states

Trees that suck up sunlight and groundwater at the expense of other prairie plants are creating new headaches throughout the Plains, including Nebraska. The eastern red cedar tree spreads so quickly that it catches many landowners off-guard, consuming huge areas of productive ranchland and threatening many of the area’s original prairies. At one point in Nebraska, the trees expanded at a pace of nearly 40,000 acres a year — an area roughly half the size of Omaha — until conservationists joined forces with local ranchers to conduct more brush-clearing burns. Conservationists call it a “green glacier” that started in Texas and Oklahoma and swept north across the Plains into Kansas, Nebraska, western Iowa and the Dakotas. “It gets worse every day,” said John Ortmann, a rangeland ecologist in Ord who has worked with conservation groups to thin the eastern red cedar population. “Some people say, ‘Wait until it’s a problem.’ That’s like saying, ‘I’m not going to change my oil until the engine blows up…'”

Ruidoso, New Mexico, News, August 1, 2017: Out on a Limb: Tree trimming is big business

A mere speck on the tall pine at back center, Jason Swanner certainly isn’t afraid of heights as he cuts dead limbs in Ruidoso. Swanner can manage a smile secured high in a pine tree. Tree trimming is big business in Ruidoso, a village surrounded by federal forest land and considered at high risk for wildfire…

Louisville, Kentucky, Courier-Journal, July 31, 2017: St. Matthews bank didn’t want to take down ‘stately tree,’ executive says

A Kentucky lawmaker wants a bank to pay for removing a majestic oak tree that stood watch over downtown St. Matthews for decades but was removed recently to make way for a new branch office. “In most cases, cutting down a healthy oak tree that’s about 100 years old is extremely short-sighted,” said Rep. Steve Riggs, whose legislative district covers part of St. Matthews. “It’s a shame we won’t have the tree anymore in the heart of St. Matthews, especially since Louisville already has an insufficient tree canopy that we’re trying to improve.” Riggs said in a press release Monday morning that he sent an email to Independence Bank officials, calling for the institution to make a donation to cover the cost of planting of 100 trees or more. The Owensboro-based bank’s Louisville vice president disputed the age of the tree, saying it was likely no more than about 50 years old. “The new Independence Bank location will be one of the greenest corners in St. Matthews,” added Louis Straub II, the bank executive. “I am a fifth-generation Louisvillian and have served on multiple community boards, including Brightside Inc. (which) strives to keep our city beautiful and green,” he said in a written statement Monday. “No one at Independence Bank was in favor of losing the tree, least of all, me. We will be a leader in efforts to beautify and improve St. Matthews, going well beyond the planting of trees, just as we do in all of the communities we serve…”

Miami, Florida, WSVN(TV), July 31, 2017: Tree grows into power lines

Trees are beautiful, but planted under power lines, they can be dangerous. The problem: Who has the power to cut the trees down before they rip down the power lines? It’s why one woman called Help Me Howard with Patrick Fraser. Yudit Hernandez: “All of our orchids, all of our stuff. I hope to make a pool one day.” Yudit Hernandez has a nice, big backyard — filled with trees. Yudit Hernandez “I have a mango tree, I have a grapefruit tree, I have a guanabana tree. I don’t know how you say that one in English, though. I just love trees. Yudit likes trees, but she’s realistic about where they should be planted. And she says, “My neighbor planted a royal poinciana right underneath the FPL wires, and it has grown into the live wires.” The royal poinciana is pretty, and it’s pretty clear it’s become a royal pain…

Bloomington, Indiana, Indiana Public Media, July 31, 2017: New campaign fights to preserve Indiana’s ash trees

A new Indiana Parks Alliance initiative will help preserve the state’s ash trees. The IPA projects that the mortality rate for ash trees infested with the emerald ash borer will reach 95% within the next decade. The beetles drill into the tree near the roots, disrupting the flow of nutrients causing the tree to slowly die. But a special insecticide can be injected into the base of the tree to prevent the beetles from invading, according to IPA President Tom Hohman. It costs about $200 to treat a single tree with the insecticide for three years. The IPA is hoping to raise $20,000 – enough money to treat about 100 trees…

Watertown, New York, Daily Times, July 31, 2017: Watertown tree survey begins

For the next month, a consultant will work on completing a street tree inventory for the city. Starting today, Davey Resource Group, a division of the Davey Tree Expert Company, will conduct the tree inventory during the month of August.  Residents will observe certified arborists, wearing high visibility clothing, inspecting and evaluating street trees between the hours of 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Inventory efforts will focus on street trees and potential planting sites within the city’s rights-of-way. The inventory will obtain an accurate depiction of the city’s street tree population. A $25,000 grant will pay for the work. The collected data will help determine tree species composition and condition, potential planting sites, required maintenance needs, as well as the environmental, economic and aesthetic benefits. It’s been 18 years since the last time a tree inventory was completed…

San Diego, California, Times, July 27, 2017: Tree trimmer in Rancho Bernardo ‘Alive, stable’ after heroic rescue

A tree-trimmer who became stranded near the top of a tall palm tree in Rancho Bernardo was rescued Thursday in a heart-dropping operation by the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. Video from several television helicopters at the scene showed that as firefighters cut the man’s harness in a final bid to pull him to safety, the man hung suspended about 50 feet in the air with his legs wrapped around the palm and his upper body on a fire engine ladder. “This was an extreme technical rescue,” SDFRD Battalion Chief Glenn Holder said. “These things don’t always have good outcomes.” Emergency crews responded to the scene about 8:45 a.m. in the backyard of a residence on the Country Club-Rancho Bernardo golf course, a SDFRD spokesman said. He was pulled to safety more than an hour later at 9:55 a.m. The tree-trimmer was “alive, breathing and stable” after the rescue, Holder said. He was placed on a stretcher once he reached the ground and was being taken to a hospital for treatment…

Root Simple Home Tech, July 27, 2017: What  tree should I plant? Cal Poly’s SelecTree has the answer

Tree knowledge is not one of my stronger skills. Thankfully Cal Poly San Luis Obispo has us tree ignorant Californians covered with an extensive, searchable tree database called SelecTree that will help you find the right tree for your yard. Or, let’s say, you’re bored with hours spent adding movies to your Netlix queue that you never plan to watch (one of my vices). How about searching for oddball trees instead? What about a California native tree with favorable fire resistance, low root damage potential that produces edible fruit? The database came up with two options, the hollyleaf cherry (Prunus ilicifolia) and the saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea). Let me also put in a plug for our favorite tree, the Fuerte avocado (Persea americana ‘Fuerte’)…

Dodge City, Kansas, High Plains Journal, July 27, 2017: Kansas Forest Service completes rural tree canopy mapping

Kansas recently became one of the few states in the U.S., and the first state in the Great Plains, to successfully map its rural tree canopy. The Kansas Forest Service partnered with the United States Forest Service-Northern Research Station to develop the geospatial layer. The USFS-NRS provided funding and methodology expertise, while the Kansas Forest Service geographic information system team did the legwork to map trees in all 105 Kansas counties. Kansas Forest Service GIS specialist, Darci Paull and two Kansas State University students worked on the project for 11 months. Student workers Jakob Whitson and Abbey Marcotte started the mapping work, and Tanner Finney was recently hired after Whitson graduated. The mapping began in June 2016 using specialized software and was published in June 2017. The GIS team is currently inventorying windbreaks statewide using a tool developed by the U.S. Forest Service, Paull said. The tool creates a grid and the team maps each windbreak that crosses an intersect for two different years (2005 and 2015). The USFS-NRS is analyzing the initial data to see what changes have occurred over time…

Cleveland, Ohio, WKYC-TV, July 27, 2017: Akron’s biggest mystery: The Signal Tree

It stands alone, its branches like arms outstretched, near the Cuyahoga River on Akron’s north side. Its massive trunk, its age-stained bark. Its scars of the past. The Signal Tree is a spectacular sight, but it swirls in mystery. Who was it that “forced” its growth pattern? If age estimates of 350-560 years are to be believed, it may have been Native Americans that traveled through the area in that time frame, well before settlers came to the Western Reserve. The famous “Portage Path” is in the area, a few miles away, where American Indians portaged their canoes between the north-flowing Cuyahoga River to the south-flowing Tuscarawas River. Indigenous peoples are known to use strangely shaped trees as boundary markers or directional landmarks, and as gathering places for ceremonies…

Austin, Texas, Statesman, July 26, 2017: Bill to ban tree ordinances passes Texas Senate

When Texans buy property, they buy the trees that come on it, and have the right to do whatever they please with them, the Texas Senate said Wednesday in a 17-14 vote on a bill to ban local tree ordinances. If passed by the Texas House and signed, Senate Bill 14 would overturn ordinances in Austin and at least 90 other Texas cities and counties that provide varying protections to trees. The measure affects only regulations of residential property and still allows counties to ban clear-cutting in unincorporated areas. It is one of nine items Gov. Greg Abbott directed for the Texas Legislature’s special session that take aim at city policies in general and Austin policies in particular. The order to overturn tree ordinances came, Abbott said in a radio interview, at least partially from his own experience trying to cut down a pecan tree at his Austin home…

Indianapolis, Indiana, WRTV, July 26, 2017: Greensburg makes repairs, preserves iconic courthouse tree

The iconic tree growing out of the Decatur County courthouse roof has been covered by scaffolding as a repair project takes place. Community members expressed concern about the health of the landmark, but city officials said the tree is healthy. The scaffolding was placed in order to repair stone on the tower of the courthouse. “There’s leaking. There’s rain water. There is water coming in somewhere,” said Janet Chadwell, county auditor. “Tree is very fine. It’s healthy.” Crews said they aren’t sure if the stone damaged is linked to the tree’s roots, but Chadwell said the city wants to preserve the tree…

Litchfield, Connecticut, County Times, July 27, 2017: Salisbury property owner’s tree clearing causes concern for lake

A property owner’s clearing of a large number of trees from his lakefront property recently caused concern among the Lake Wononscopomuc community, but steps are being taken by local officials to prevent a similar situation from reoccurring. According to William Littauer, president of the Lake Wononscopomuc Association, the property owner of 209 Sharon Road, Quentin Vandooseleare, had recently removed trees located within the 75-foot lake setback zone on more than an acre of his waterfront property without first receiving permission from the town of Salisbury. “I think he went too far,” Littauer said last week. “It’s a little extreme. But his contention was that no permit was required and he did nothing wrong. He just wanted a better view of the lake.” Littauer said the question that remains to be answered is whether or not a law presently exists that declares the action to be illegal. “If regulations are in place, they’re not clear,” he said…

Portland, Maine, Press-Herald, July 27, 2017: LePage moves to dig up abuse of tree growth tax program

Gov. Paul LePage has ordered the Maine Forest Service to work with municipal officials to review properties enrolled in the state’s tree growth tax program to root out potential abuses. The program offers landowners property tax breaks when they promise to actively manage their woodlands with regular harvesting activities. The law was originally created to help keep timber flowing to the state’s wood products industries including lumber and paper mills but LePage and others have said they believe the program is being misused or even abused by some woodland owners. “… the failure of some woodland owners to follow their forest management plan under the Tree Growth Tax Law Program jeopardizes the credibility of the program and creates perennial uncertainty about the program’s stability among the large percentage of woodland owners who are fulfilling their responsibilities under their forest management plans;” the governor’s executive order reads in part. Under the order, forest service foresters will help municipalities review the properties benefiting from the program in order to help identify landowners who may not be following adequate management plans…

Austin, Texas, Statesman, July 25, 2017: Dozens of people tell House committee to scrap tree bill

Dozens of Texans told the House Urban Affairs Committee on Tuesday to let their own communities set local tree and land use regulations. The panel heard testimony for more than five hours on three bills. House Bill 77 by state Rep. Drew Darby, R-San Angelo, would require cities to allow builders to have the option to pay a fee instead of dedicating parkland “as a condition of approval for the development of real property.” Darby said the intent behind the bill is to give builders a choice, especially when dedicating parkland is not feasible. Supporters of the bill, builders in particular, said a fee option would allow them to get the most out of their land. But opponents, mostly city officials not wanting the state to preempt local rules and residents who like trees and parks say such local ordinances contribute to quality of life…

Springfield, Ohio, News-Sun, July 25, 2017: Springfield warns neighbors to be wary of unlicensed tree workers

Springfield leaders have warned residents to look out for unlicensed tree workers after weekend storms caused damage in local neighborhoods. Early morning storms tore down trees and damaged roofs in the Northern Estates neighborhood on Saturday. A 52-year-old tree in Xena Haley’s front yard had limbs thrown from it. It had to be torn down immediately because it was a hazard, Haley said. “My tree had full branches hanging down off my tree, big branches,” she said. But she didn’t want to hire just anyone to do the job, she said. She made sure the company was licensed…

Pasadena, California, Star-News, July 25, 2017: Protestors decry Alhambra housing project that would destroy 229 trees at retirement home

Plans to raze a 92-year-old church and remove 229 mature shade trees to make way for a townhome project prompted a march with signs and songs of protest at the steps of City Hall on Monday night. Waving signs that read, “Represent us, not lobbyists” and “Save Our Trees,” the 25-person group wanted the City Council to order a rigorous environmental review of the project, as well as an arborist’s report with the aim of saving as many trees as possible. Owner TAG 2 Medical Investment and its developer, St. Clair Partners in Irvine, are seeking approval from the city to knock down the church, most of the trees and rows of older cottages — once part of the Scripps Kensington Retirement Community — to build attached housing and office buildings on the 12-acre property at 1428 S. Marengo Ave. After the City Council gave its initial blessing June 12, opponents were surprised when two weeks later, the council pulled the project from its agenda when it came back for a second reading…

Center for International Forestry Research, July 25, 2017: Moving past tree planting, expanding our definition of forests and restoration

What is a forest? And how do you restore one? These seemingly simple questions were interrogated – with a focus on solutions – during a panel discussion at the 2017 Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation Meeting, recently concluded in Merida, Mexico. A group of experts on Latin American forests examined both the conservation and restoration of secondary forests from a variety of angles, including the ecological, political and social dimensions of such spaces. Beginning with the premise that “secondary forest regrowth following agricultural land use represents a major component of human modified landscapes across the tropics”, the panel emphasized the essential role of secondary forests for humans living in proximity, as well as for restoration initiatives and international goals, such as the United Nations Aichi Biodiversity Targets…

Jacksonville, Florida, WJAX-TV, July 24, 2017: 5 vital steps to take before hiring tree trimming service

After another potential victim called News4Jax to sound off on a local lawn business accused of ripping off elderly women, the I-TEAM discovered that this line of work is largely uncontrolled in Florida. For weeks, more people who paid Hilton Long Lawn and Tree Service to do work have come forward, saying he took their money and never completed the work.On the business card, Hilton Long Law and Tree Service offers its license number. But the I-TEAM went to track that down and learned the number just proves that the company paid city taxes and is allowed to do business in Jacksonville. But the I-TEAM also uncovered the legitimacy of the business and many like it are regulated by no one. “He talked about what good Christians they were and how reliable their work was going to be, gave me his insurance certificate,” Linda Milford said. “I thought I’d done everything I should.”Milford is one of several local women who called the I-TEAM to complain about unfinished or damaging work by Hilton Long Lawn and Tree Service…

Louisville, Kentucky, Courier-Journal, July 24, 2017: Louisville business group stays neutral on tree protection ordinance

The largest business organization in Louisville won’t be taking a position on a proposed tree protection ordinance. Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, had been urging voluntary approaches to grow and protect the city’s tree canopy, instead of a new ordinance designed to better protect street trees in Louisville. But it has recently decided to be neutral on the proposed ordinance, said Sarah Davasher-Wisdom, chief operating officer of GLI, in a written statement. That news comes as the Louisville Metro Council’s Public Works, Parks, Sustainability and Transportation Committee will hold a public hearing on the proposed ordinance… Councilwoman Cindi Fowler, D-14th District, chairs the committee and said she wants to hear from the public, whether they support or oppose the ordinance. The ordinance has been designed to help Louisville restore a tree canopy that’s been devastated by storms, age, disease and insects — and to help reduce urban heat and fight air pollution…

Austin, Texas, Statesman, July 24, 2017: Two Views: Texas tree ordinances are eminent domain in all but name

During the current special session, the Texas Legislature will address the seemingly simple question: Who owns the tree in your backyard? Nearly 50 municipalities in Texas have ordinances preventing landowners from removing trees from their private property without receiving the city’s permission — and they often require property owners to pay a fee to mitigate the loss of trees. Gov. Greg Abbott made restricting these local ordinances a priority. But such tree ordinances already have questionable legality. The Texas Constitution has a provision — the Takings Clause, which echoes the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution — that states when government takes private property for a public use, it must pay just compensation to the landowner. Municipalities with these tree ordinances have trampled the constitutional commitment to private property rights. In their efforts to regulate trees on private property, these cities have prevented Texans from making full use of their private land by requiring them to keep trees on their property against their will. This establishes a government taking for a public use, though these cities have not provided their citizens with just compensation, as constitutionally required…

Snowbrains.com, July 24, 2017: Lake Tahoe tree deaths double since 2015

The Tahoe Fund today announced a campaign to raise $36,000 to support a project designed by UC Davis scientists to improve forest health in the Basin.  Despite the record-breaking snowfall in Tahoe this past winter, tree mortality remains a major issue. Due to drought and bark beetle infestations, tree mortality more than doubled from 35,000 in 2015 to 72,000 in 2016. Tahoe Fund is partnering with scientists at UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center to help repopulate the hardest hit areas along the north shore of Tahoe with native sugar pine trees. “While a lot of attention goes to our beautiful lake, Tahoe would not be the same without our fabulous forests,” says Amy Berry, Tahoe Fund CEO. “It is heartbreaking to see our mountains turning red with dying trees. With the support of donors, we have the opportunity to help by replanting sugar pines to provide diversity and stability to our forests.” Scientists at UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center plan to collect seeds from more than 100 different sugar pine trees around Tahoe. Over the course of the next year they will grow these seeds into 10,000 seedlings that can be planted in areas with the greatest mortality rates.  The 10,000 seedlings will be distributed to public agencies to be planted along the north shore in both California and Nevada. The program also includes distribution of thousands of seedlings to private homeowners who have experienced tree loss…

Little Rock, Arkansas, KATV, July 23, 2017: Complaints against Tree Man growingA promise…an extension…but still no refund for an elderly Arkansas couple. Seven-On-Your-Side surprised Omar Rivers…”The Tree Man”…outside his

Benton motel room three weeks ago. And to no one’s surprise…Omar has failed to keep his word. And since our first story on June 30th we have learned of another homeowner who says he paid Omar Rivers only to never see him again. “You ain’t gonna put me on TV, are you?” a surprised Rivers asked back in June. “Maybe.” “Huh?” “Maybe.” “Don’t do that now,” pleaded Rivers. “It depends on what happens in this case.” “Oh yeah…I’ll get the job done,” pledged Rivers. “I get the job done don’t put me on TV. Deal? (laughs)…”

Houston, Texas, Chronicle, July 23, 2017: Senate panel okays tree-cutting proposal

A bill designed to obliterate local tree-cutting ordinances was approved Sunday by a Texas Senate committee after members exempted homeowners associations from having to comply. Even so, opponents said the measure would likely prohibit Houston’s highly touted new tree district from taking effect. “If you have communities that are named after trees, I would be concerned,” said state Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, after a revised version of the bill was taken up for approval by the Senate Business and Commerce Committee during a rare Sunday meeting. Whitmire said he thinks that property owners in local communities should have the ability to make the call on what trees can be trimmed or cut down, rather than “people in Wichita Falls, in East Texas” — a reference to other senators on the committee who voted for the bill…

Springfield, Massachusetts, Republican, July 23, 2017: Warwick Town Forest expansion will protect black gum trees

The Franklin County hilltown pf Warwick hosts a rare black gum swamp, and now the plant habitat will be protected. State Senate President Stan Rosenberg, D-Amherst, on Friday announced $100,000 to expand the Warwick Town Forest by 97 acres, ensuring that the tree species and its surrounding ecosystem will prosper. Black gum, also known as black tupelo or sourgum, tends to grow in acidic peat bogs, often alongside red maples. The slow-growing tree with furrowed bark produces small flowers and a tiny sour fruit. However, it generally reproduces through root and stump sprouts. Some of the trees can be 300 to 500 years old, according to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.  In 1925, Warwick voted to purchase 100 acres at the corner of Hockanum and Wendell roads, creating the town forest. Nearly a century later, the North Quabbin region, stretching into New Hampshire, is known for its large, unbroken areas of forest habitat…

Clemson, South Carolina, Extension Service, July 23, 2017: Never bury the roots or bark of trees

One of the least favorite sentences to come out of my mouth is “You damaged/killed your tree.” This past week I visited a home where they had a large beautiful dogwood in center of their front yard, but now it has a few large dead limbs. About a year ago they moved a few inches of soil in a fairly large circle around the trunk of the tree and planted roses. What they did not realize is that bark and roots need to breathe and even large trees have shallow root systems. Tree roots are near the soil surface so they can breathe and if you add more soil on top you are in fact drowning the tree roots. Usually it takes a few years for a tree to decline but their dogwood was old, faced the heavy rains of the last couple of years, and was in direct full sun. Dogwoods like partial shade, moist but not wet soil, and older trees (like me) cannot take the stress they did when they were young. Another very poor horticultural practice, volcano mulching or the piling of mulch at the trunk of a trees, can be seen all over Florence. I call volcano mulching the pink flamingo of gardening because it is out in your front yard signaling to everyone that passes that you don’t really know much about gardening…

Anaheim, California, Orange County Register, July 20, 2017: Seal Beach resident to pay city $250,000 for 153 trees destroyed in park

Seal Beach resident Rocky Gentner has agreed to pay the city $250,000 to settle its lawsuit over the destruction of 153 trees in Gum Grove Park last year. On March 19, 2016, tree trimmers hired by Gentner mowed down the Brazilian pepper trees behind his home on Crestview Avenue, a residential street bordering the 11-acre park. In a brief telephone interview with the Orange County Register after the demolition, Gentner said, “They weren’t trees, they were bushes – and they were dead.” But Seal Beach City Attorney Craig Steele disputed that assessment, saying the “trees were alive when they were cut.” “It’s just total disregard for the park,” said Mike Varipapa, the councilman who represents the neighborhood. Last summer, the city sent Gentner a letter demanding reimbursement for the “unpermitted, illegal” clearing of trees — some of which were small offshoots of mature trees…

Wallingford, Connecticut, Record-Journal, July 20, 2017: Palm trees don’t satisfy zoning requirement, Wallingford planner says

Since Cariati Developers planted palm trees along its building earlier this summer, president Donnie Cariati says the public has shown a lot of interest. “People seem to really enjoy them,” Cariati said. “They’re stopping and taking pictures. It adds character and it’s different.” The company planted about 18 palm trees along the perimeter of its property at 70 N. Plains Industrial Road. Cariati said he planted the palm trees to meet landscaping requirements imposed by the Planning and Zoning Commission. As a condition for a special permit last year, the company was required to improve landscaping on the property, including planting trees. When someone applies for a special permit, the commission will sometimes approve the permit on the condition that the applicant updates its landscaping…

Belfast, Maine, Republican Journal, July 20, 2017: City needs better plan for sidewalks, large trees, officials say

Piecemeal sidewalk repairs and tree maintenance isn’t cutting it, but it might be necessary while the city makes a long-term plan, city officials said July 18. Deliberations about a large maple tree at 220 Main St. have stretched over several City Council meetings. Douglas Beitler, who bought the property this month, has asked to have it removed because of rot. The council, which has a history of trying to save shade trees, was hesitant to declare the tree finished after conflicting advice from arborists who said, despite a seam of rot on the side facing away from the street, the roughly 150-year-old tree is still strong. Green’s Tree Service submitted a quote to remove the tree for $5,000. The city’s tree maintenance budget is up this year to $11,000 from $8,000, but several councilors argued that won’t be nearly enough considering the number of trees of the same age as the one in question…

Wrangell, Alaska, Sentinel, July 20, 2017: Newly found fungus could threaten Southeast Alaska trees

A fungus that damages trees is making its way through the state of Alaska. The fungus, spruce bud blight, has left damage in Southcentral and Interior Alaska, and now has been discovered for the first time in the southeast part of the state. The infection was discovered in Southeast Alaska in late June, the first reported sighting in the region, CoastAlaska News reported Thursday. The blight infects Sitka spruce, one of the most common trees in Southeast Alaska’s rainforest…

San Francisco, California, KTVU-TV, July 20, 2017: Prop E means San Francisco now picks up $19M tab to trim trees

If you live in San Francisco and have a tree in front of your house, you know how expensive it can be to maintain it and the sidewalk, which can buckle when roots grow out of hand. For the first time, the city is picking up the tab to keep residents’ trees trimmed and sidewalks fixed at a cost of $19 million a year. On Wednesday, in sunny Noe Valley, tree trimming crews stood by with a cherry picker, wood chipper and harnesses as Public Works rolled out its “Street Tree SF” program, a voter-backed initiative that places the maintenance of the city’s 125,000 street trees under city care. Vince Shortino lives on 23rd Street near Castro Street where crews got busy trimming his 25-foot-tall Chinese elm tree which has fanned out so much, it’s entangled in power lines. To trim it himself, would have cost at least $500. “Now it’s starting to damage the sidewalk a bit, maybe the street, could be some sewer lines under there we’re not sure,” said Shortino. In the past, he, along with hundreds of other homeowners, would have had to have coughed up more than ten thousand dollars to repair buckled sidewalks and sewer lines pierced by invasive roots…

Sacramento, California, KXTV, July 19, 2017: The Detwiler fire X factor: dead trees

The Detwiler Fire exploded in size over the last few days, but this fire may behave differently because of what it is burning. Let’s go back to the beginning of the 2011 winter season to understand what is happening. Following the last big rain and snow season in 2010-11, the Sierra and California had all the water it needed, and life was good. Beginning the following season, the pattern changed and we began a four-year major drought. The Central and Southern Sierra was hit especially hard with very warm temps and dry conditions. This was the bark beetle’s opportunity to take off and it did. Various droughts and warm winters are allowing the bark beetle in the Sierra and Rockies a rare opportunity to grow it’s population. Cold wet winters will cut the populations down, but we have seen the same thing all over the west. The bark beetles burrow into the trees and kill pines and other species. The result is a patchwork of healthy forests with millions of dead and dying trees intermixed, making the problem difficult to manage…

Battle Creek, Michigan, Enquirer, July 19, 2017: After more power outages, Consumers Energy is trimming trees on Battle Creek’s south side

After more outages than usual, Consumers Energy will trim trees around power lines on Battle Creek’s south side. In a news release, the city of Battle Creek said the affected area — between Capital Avenue Southwest and Riverside Drive near Beckley Road — has seen four tree-related power outages since April. That’s compared to a total of six outages in the prior two years. The company’s contractor may begin trimming at the end of the week, the city said. The work is expected to take a week to complete. Most of the work will take place south of East Hamilton Lane. Neighbors in these areas already should have received notification of the work, the city said…

Phys.org, July 19, 2017: Growing better trees faster

A new research collaboration could significantly increase the quality and economic productivity of one of the UK’s largest crop outputs, Sitka spruce conifer trees. Using a breeding technique called ‘genomic selection’, researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh and from Forest Research, an agency of the Forestry Commission, hope to accurately identify, at a very early age, fast growing trees with superior timber quality. In doing so, the ‘Sitka Spruced’ research initiative could improve the economic value of future spruce plantations in the UK. In addition, by enhancing the quality of the wood, harvests are more likely to meet the changing construction specifications required to build our houses. The Sitka spruce is the UK’s primary timber species, with over 35 million Sitka trees planted in the UK each year. It is the third largest crop by area of cultivation in the UK, after wheat and barley, and accounts for around £1bn of the industry’s £2bn annual revenue. Fast growing and suited to the moist climate of western and northern Britain, the species produces a versatile white wood, with uses from paper making, to building construction. It takes around 40 years from planting before most Sitka spruce trees are harvested, and only a proportion of those trees meet the stronger, higher value construction grades. The project will scan hundreds of trees for variations in their DNA and then match those variations with fast-growing trees that produce superior timber. This will enable scientists to screen the DNA of the trees, to identify the fastest growing, with the best quality timber…

Grit, July 19, 2017: What you should know before planting fruit trees

Growing your own food is a fulfilling and delicious process. Having fruit trees means that you have the opportunity to enjoy fresh, sweet fruit during harvest time and then throughout the year, assuming you can or jelly your fruits for later. Planting fruit trees can be a relatively simple process as long as you are informed and educated about the trees that grow best in your area. Below are a few things to know before planting fruit trees so that you can successfully grow and harvest fruit. One of the best things about deciding to plant fruit trees is that you get to choose what types of fruit you want to grow. Make a list of your favorites, then ask your family what their favorites are. Once you have a list, figure out which trees you can plant in your area. Different fruit trees thrive in different areas, so picking the right type of fruit tree will ensure a bountiful harvest. The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map gives you the information you’ll need to pick the right trees for your area…

 

Morganton, North Carolina, News-Herald, July 18, 2017: If a tree falls and no one is around to see it, who foots the bill?

Luscious trees are among the many qualities that help give Morganton its nickname “Nature’s Playground.” But with Mother Nature likely to come through town with storms throughout the summer, the possibility of trees falling may be increased. But if a tree falls and causes damage to your property or someone else’s, who is at fault? Certified Insurance Counselor Dalton Walters recently explained who would be responsible in multiple tree-falling scenarios at Mimosa Insurance Agency in Morganton. “There are so many questions about them in North Carolina from almost every angle,” Walters said…

Baltimore, Maryland, Sun, July 18, 2017: Cherry trees planted by volunteers along Catonsville road found sliced, damaged

Flowering cherry trees stretching half-a-mile along the median of Edmondson Avenue in Catonsville were found deliberately damaged this week and Baltimore County police say they have no suspects. Five of the 32 Kwanzan trees planted by the Catonsville Tree Canopy Project were dead when James Himel, the group’s director, arrived with a fellow volunteer Monday morning to water them. Himel said he called the police after he determined every tree had been hit. The other 27 trees are “severely injured,” but still alive, he said, although 10 are showing signs of poisoning…

Canton, Georgia, Cherokee Tribune & Ledger-News, July 18, 2017: Trees coming down in the county, state road officials say ‘routine maintenance’

As residents drive along Interstate 575 headed into Cherokee, they will notice a pile of trees on the side of the highway headed for the chipper. The talk of the town in Cherokee County has been, “What is happening to all of the trees?” But according to the Georgia Department of Transportation, it is just “routine maintenance.” “Georgia DOT is currently conducting, or planning, overgrown vegetation management work along all of Georgia’s interstates, including I-575 in Cherokee County,” said GDOT spokesman Mohamed Arafa. “This work is intended to improve visibility and enhance safety along the interstate.” Arafa said the work that will be done along the interstate includes removing overgrown vegetation that encroaches on the shoulders and slopes, reducing trees and bushes within rights of way to safeguard motorists and provide adequate room for vehicle recovery if someone leaves the roadway and ensuring the visibility of warning, informational and instructional signs…

Washington, D.C., DNR, July 18, 2017: Have you watered your trees lately?

The dog days of summer are upon us, so it’s a good thing we have trees to help keep us cool! Summer is a great time to kick back, relax, and enjoy the nice weather. But this month and next can be hard on trees, and they can use our help. Don’t be fooled by cloudy weather, because it does not necessarily mean moisture. In Washington, most of the annual accumulation of moisture comes in three seasons, fall, winter and spring. Summer is typically very dry. This weather pattern is great for vacations and back yard barbecues, but difficult for trees – particularly newly planted trees. When we do get moisture, it may not be enough for our leafy friends, especially those planted within the last year or two. Even if you are watering your lawn on a regular basis, your trees might not be getting enough to drink. Grass roots, after all, only grow to a depth of several inches. In contrast, trees roots are deeper, from about 18” to 24” deep…

Austin, Texas, Monitor, July 17, 2017: City of Austin welcomes Texas AG opinion on local tree rules

In Austin, and in about 60 other Texas cities, you need to get a permit before you cut down some large or historic trees. Opponents of those tree preservation rules – including Gov. Greg Abbott – call them a violation of property rights. Now, Attorney General Ken Paxton has weighed in, and those opponents may not be happy with his opinion. The opinion says tree preservation rules could lead to so-called “regulatory takings.” That means if a landowner can make their case in court, they might be owed compensation for being required to keep a tree on their lot. That could seem like a win for people who want the rules thrown out. But the opinion stops short of saying there’s anything unconstitutional about the rules. “There’s lots of ways that could seem ominous to towns and cities who are thinking about these kinds of ordinances,” said David Spence, a professor of law, politics and regulation at the University of Texas. “But it doesn’t change the constitutional law at issue…”

Santa Fe, New Mexico, New Mexican, July 17, 2017: For Tree Doctors 911, cutting down is ‘last resort’

There are times it seems when only Steve Thomas and his Tree Doctor 911 crew can save a sick or dying tree. Around the world, from diagnosing ailing trees from the back of an elephant in Thailand to administering first aid to a severely wounded Russian olive tree in Eldorado, Thomas said he “almost never loses” a tree. Thomas, the son of a Clovis nursery owner and tree healer, works out of offices in Albuquerque and his major-projects center in Bijagua, in Costa Rica’s Guanacaste province. However, he has been spending more time of late in Santa Fe, where he says “they have a great heart to save trees. … People here are more tree-friendly than they are in other parts of the state.” Thomas plans to open a Santa Fe office sooner than later, and push the City Council toward supporting tree-preservation measures…

Santa Rosa, California, North Bay Business Journal, July 17, 2017: California fights over trees inflame emotions

People adore their own trees but often vilify the trees of neighbors that block views, drop leaves or limbs, topple and smash cars, or buckle driveways with intrusive roots. Conflicts over trees can rage months or years with great intensity. Sometimes the fight swirls around damage and liability. Other times, overgrown egos clash and trees become an excuse for battle. Larry Ellison, founder and chairman of Oracle with 2017 net worth estimated at more than $60 billion, bought a 10,000-square-foot home in San Francisco’s Pacific Heights. His neighbors, Jane and Bernard von Bothmer, had a pair of redwoods that grew to shield their privacy from Ellison’s frequent parties — and block Ellison’s view of the bay. The business titan tried to buy the von Bothmer home for $15 million; they said no. Eventually Ellison sued, demanding that the neighbors trim the redwoods. With trial set for June 2011, the case settled and the von Bothmers agreed to trim trees. Then Ellison bought the house next door, 22 bedrooms for $40 million, further ensuring his view…

Charleston, South Carolina, Post & Courier, July 17, 2017: DOT didn’t need permit from Charleston County to take down 3 grand trees on Wadmalaw Island, Court of Appeals rules

The state Department of Transportation acted legally when it felled three “grand trees” on Maybank Highway without seeking Charleston County’s permission, the state Court of Appeals ruled. The county argued that the DOT should replace the trees or pay into a county tree fund, something that the agency refused to do. A circuit judge ruled against the county, which prompted the appeal. The county has not decided whether to challenge the Court of Appeals decision to the S.C. Supreme Court…

Chino, California, Champion, July 15, 2017: Pruning practice endangers trees

A row of eucalyptus trees at 14635 Pipeline Ave. in Chino Hills are suffering after having been “topped,” a pruning practice known to be harmful. Sean O’Connor, maintenance and operations manager for Chino Hills, said the topping has caused sunburn damage to the trunks of the red iron bark eucalyptus, turning them black. “This is one of a number of reasons that trees should not be topped,” said Mr. O’Connor, a certified arborist. “Topping is not an accepted arboriculture practice and this pruning has caused significant damage.” The trees are not owned by the city but belong to the Montessori School parcel. Mr. O’Connor pointed out the shoots, or suckers, growing from the wounds of the trees, which is the result of a sudden loss of leaves. He provided a link to the International Society of Arboriculture that describes topping as perhaps the “most harmful tree pruning practice known, despite more than 25 years of literature and seminars explaining its harmful effects…”

Dallas, Texas, Morning News, July 16, 2017, Trees, texts and taxes: Texas lawmakers prep for heated debate over ‘local control’ 

Let the civics lessons begin. Nearly half of Gov. Greg Abbott’s 20-item checklist for the special legislative session that starts Tuesday consists of proposals to clamp down on what he calls “a patchwork quilt of regulations” and undisciplined spending by localities. Let the civics lessons begin. Nearly half of Gov. Greg Abbott’s 20-item checklist for the special legislative session that starts Tuesday consists of proposals to clamp down on what he calls “a patchwork quilt of regulations” and undisciplined spending by localities…

Plattsburgh, New York, Press-Republican, July 16, 2017: DEC: Report oak trees losing leaves – Public asked to assist in weeding out invasive fungus

Reporting oak trees that lose some or all of their leaves in July or August is the goal of a new oak wilt awareness campaign by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos recently announced plans to manage the spread of the invasive species that causes oak wilt. Oak wilt is a serious tree disease in the eastern United States, killing thousands of oaks each year in forests, woodlots, and home landscapes. Oak wilt is caused by a fungus, Ceratocystis fagacearum, which grows in the water conducting vessels of host trees, plugging up these vessels and preventing water transport. As water movement within the tree is slowed, the leaves wilt and drop off…

Augusta, Georgia, News-Times, July 16, 2017: Thin-barked trees susceptible to bark-splitting condition

I have received several calls about split bark, or vertical cracks along the trunk of young trees. This condition most commonly occurs on thin-barked trees such as dogwood, elm, maple, plum and cherry. These cracks can become long-term open wounds that are susceptible to insects, diseases and wood decay. Unfortunately, after this damage has occurred, there is no help we can provide the tree. Prevention is the best solutions and can be done with a little planning before planting. Thin-barked trees planted in hot sites with full sun exposure in the afternoon are highly susceptible to a disorder known as sunscald. Sunscald can occur when the cambium cells – active, growing tissues under the bark – heat up too rapidly during sunny fall or winter days. Extremely cold temperatures following warm periods can also kill cambium cells in the trunk. Research has shown that the south side of a tree can be as much as 77 degrees warmer on a cold winter day than the north side of the tree. The newly activated cells lose some of their cold-hardiness and are injured when temperatures drop below freezing during the nighttime hours. The portions of trunks and branches facing south and southwest warm the most because they get the most direct sun and because they get sun later in the day when air temperatures are warmest…

Anaheim, California, Orange County Register, July 13, 2017: Laguna Beach re-evaluates maintenance program for its 2,600-plus trees

Public trees that are failing or pose risk and are six inches or less in diameter will no longer require a public meeting and arborist reports for removal. The Laguna Beach City Council on Tuesday, July 11, came to this decision while reviewing the city’s policies on its public tree inventory, now at more than 2,600. Council members agreed it was likely trees of this size would not be historic or “trees of any significance.” They agreed that ailing or dead trees would not need public vetting but that city staff would notify City Manager John Pietig and the council on any tree requiring removal. The council also reviewed its annual and biennial tree maintenance program which included setting a schedule for city trees based on their location and species. They also considered who pays if a resident wants a public tree laced or cut for aesthetic reasons outside the city’s scheduled trimming rotation. A plan for private trees will be reviewed by the council at a later date…

Total Landscape Care, July 13, 2017: Choosing the best trees for commercial landscapes

As a landscaper, you better than anyone know that creating a beautiful landscape is important, but more important than that is to find beautiful plants that can thrive in the environment in which they are planted. This is even more true when dealing with trees planted near commercial buildings. While landscaping for homes comes with its own set of challenges, landscaping for businesses is no walk in the park. Commercial businesses can be some of the greatest assets to the landscaping industry because they are interested in investing in attractive looks for their campuses. This gives you the ability to be creative in design and lets you encourage more green looks in the realm of big business. With commercial landscapes, however, you have to think about exposures, the public’s use of the site and vehicular traffic. Maintaining trees for commercial landscapes can take a bit more planning as well because the trees must be irrigated, cared for and pruned often in places where there is high public traffic and in parking lots…

Miami, Florida, Herald, July 13, 2017: High court tells homeowners who lost trees to go back to court after governor’s veto

Homeowners in Broward and Lee counties who lost their citrus trees to canker were told by Florida’s highest court Thursday that because of the governor’s veto, they’ll have to go back to court to get the money. The 6-1 ruling by the Florida Supreme Court continues the legal limbo that has trapped homeowners for the last decade as they try to get redress after the state destroyed their healthy citrus trees as part of its ailed Citrus Canker Eradication Program between 2000 and 2006. After years of litigation, the Legislature for the first time set aside the money in June — $20.9 million to 70,036 Broward tree owners and $16.4 million to 167,677 homeowners in Lee County. But Gov. Rick Scott vetoed the $37.3 million, ignoring the order by the court that the state pay the money on the grounds that destroying the trees without adequate compensation was an unconstitutional “taking” and instead argued that the veto was warranted “because of ongoing litigation…”

Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Eagle Gazette, July 13, 2017: Nothing divine about the tree-of-heaven

I can understand why the first city planners and horticulturists believed they hit the jackpot when they introduced the tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) from China into North American cities and countrysides. From afar, the tree has a graceful appearance. Its long, weeping leaves are pinnately compound, and a single leaf, comprised of paired leaflets running linearly parallel, may reach a length of over two feet. Tree-of-heaven grows fast and can put down roots in almost any soil condition, sidewalk crack, or sometimes even bare rock, which made it a natural choice for the contaminated dirt found in many large metropolitan areas. Unfortunately, these growth characteristics that seemed ideal during the tree’s introduction, have now become the thing of ecologists’ nightmares as tremendous amounts of effort and dollars is being spent trying to control rogue populations from taking over the landscape and ruining fragile ecosystems. Though somewhat shade intolerant, and typically found in full sun, they will quickly colonize any disturbed area, and are especially adept at taking over temporary openings in forests caused by fires, wind or human activity. Once established, they produce an allelopathic substance called ailanthone which acts as a natural herbicide to suppress or eliminate any competing plants growing near the tree-of-heaven…

Seattle, Washington, West Seattle Blog, July 12, 2017: Puget Park tree thinning: Why hundreds of trees will be removed before thousands are planted

An unusual forest-restoration project – involving a significant amount of tree-cutting as well as tree-planting – is about to get under way in eastern West Seattle’s Puget Park, after three years of planning. The project leader says it’s work that will have benefits for decades and centuries to come – but it’s a project unlike any other they’ve undertaken, and they want people to understand why it will require taking out hundreds of trees (an estimated 600 “stems” – some trees have more than one). We went to a weekend briefing to find out more firsthand. It’s a Seattle Parks project under the umbrella of the Green Seattle Partnership, which will have 1,500 acres in restoration citywide by year’s end. The challenge here is that the area has an “unnaturally dense hardwood canopy” – far out of balance with evergreens, and bringing them back requires removing some of that dense canopy…

Napa, California, Register, July 12, 2017: St. Helena Council disbands Tree Committee

The St. Helena City Council agreed Tuesday to disband the city’s Tree Committee due to a lack of members. The council will authorize city staff to take action on tree permits that previously came before the committee, which was established in 1995. Staff’s decisions may be appealed to the council. As of July 1, only two out of the Tree Committee’s seven seats were filled, so it was unable to muster a quorum necessary to hold a meeting. With several tree removal permits pending and no applicants responding to the city’s recruitment efforts, city staff recommended that the committee be disbanded…

Los Angeles, California, Times, July 12, 2017: Citing cost concerns, Laguna Beach council revises maintenance policies of city’s trees

On-site meetings with arborists will no longer be required when considering whether to remove dead trees or trees of 6 inches in diameter or less on public property in Laguna Beach. The City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved revisions to current policies regarding the city’s stock of 2,647 trees. Council members agreed with staff’s recommendation that trees of 6 inches or less in diameter that are damaged, in serious decline and/or dying do not need arborist reports, peer review of the reports or meetings. The city cited cost concerns regarding the aforementioned steps, which can lead to fees exceeding $3,500 for one tree, according to a staff report…

Paris, Tennessee, Post-Intelligencer, July 12, 2017: Trashy trees can produce stinking fruit and dropping bombs

Of all the hundreds (nay, thousands) of mistakes I have made in the half century or more of gardening, the most lasting and harmful have been in choosing trees. Pick a wrong annual and the problem can be corrected the next year, or even in the same year. With perennials, the time element is a bit more troublesome, and with shrubs, even more time is potentially lost on a sorry choice.  Trees, however, by their very nature, don’t gain enough stature to prove their mettle, or lack of it, in less than 10 years or so, and sometimes it is twice or thrice that. Some trees that drop messy fruit don’t even start to bear until they are 20 or more years old. Perfect case in point: The gingko tree, a prehistoric relic from China, makes up into a beautiful shade tree that can reach 100 feet tall, produces fruit on female trees only. The mushy orbs, that resemble persimmons, drop in fall and create a sickening stink. It has been described as a cross between vomit and dirty baby diapers. It is at least that bad…

Sarnia, Ontario, Journal, July 11, 2017: City’s proposed tree bylaw intrusive and punitive, arborist says

A local arborist says city residents have every reason to be upset by Sarnia’s proposed tree bylaw, which he calls an overreach by local government that will also hurt businesses like his own. “When you come into a dictatorship of what you can and can’t do on your property legally, you run into a problem,” said Ron Campbell, owner of Lambton Tree Service. The draft bylaw, which is out for public review and comment, would require every property owner in the urban area who wants to remove a tree to first obtain a permit. Obtaining a permit would require a written application and a plan or drawing of the property. The property owner must also pay an as-yet unspecified fee, and, possibly obtain a report from an arborist at his or her expense…

PR Newswire, July 11, 2017: Tree removal permit launches and becomes nationwide resource for local tree protection ordinances and permits

Tree Removal Permit is proud to announce its launch. Created to address tree removal needs, Tree Removal Permit collects, details and outlines the tree removal permit process, providing a streamlined information source for the removal of dead, dying, injured or hazardous trees. The goal is nothing less than to greatly streamline the process of tree removal for homeowners and business owners across the nation, as they often do not know the proper information when the need arises to remove hazardous trees. Tree Removal Permit analyzes and extracts relevant local tree ordinances so homeowners are aware of their respective regulations and corresponding city departments. Additionally, Tree Removal Permit provides easy to understand information regarding emergency tree removal from private property, as well information on how to address power line interfering nuisance trees and trees of public property. Instructions and PDFs for any permit application are now readily available through http://www.treeremovalpermit.com. A wealth of information is also available through the company blog and Facebook page. Currently, Tree Removal Permit is in the process of compiling its extensive tree removal database. The aim is to provide key information on the tree removal process for each major city in all 50 states. Tree Removal Permit visitors will have access to everything from city hotlines and local power companies to local arborists, city government departments and emergency tree removal companies…

Technology.org, July 11, 2017: Chemical fingerprints against illegally harvested trees

Scientists from Oregon USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station have developed a method of determining where a piece of wood comes from, based on its unique chemical signature. This is a break through to fight against illegally harvested trees from protected areas. Off-course imported lumber is accompanied by documents that state its geographic origin, but unfortunately it can easily be forged. The researchers used a technique known as DART-TOFMS (direct analysis in real time time-of-flight mass spectrometry), that allows them to detect the presence and relative abundance of various chemicals in the annual growth rings of wood samples. The samples are tiny, and could be made ready for analysis in 15 seconds. These analysis shows that trees from the same population shared the same unique chemical fingerprint. Those chemical fingerprints differs between two populations, which are located less than 100 km apart. It has to be determined if those differences are due to genetic factors, environmental factors, or a combination of the two. In comparing samples taken from 188 trees, the scientists were able to determine which of the populations each sample came from with an accuracy rate of 70 percent that could be improved as the technology is refined…

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Inquirer, July 11, 2017: Officials: Century old trees cut down for illegal 2-acre Pa. pot farm

Officials have uncovered one of  the Pennsylvania’s largest illegal marijuana growing operations in state forest, where 100-year-old trees were cut down to make way for the gardens. A Juniata couple arrested on charges of growing pot in their home face charges in connection with the case, the Public Opinion in Chambersburg reported. About two acres of trees were cut down in the Tuscarora State Forest in Mifflin County to grow about 1,000 marijuana plants, officials stated. Some of the timber had been used to make raised beds for the grow operation, the paper reported. “We were especially disappointed that one large conifer was cut down,” Steve Wacker, assistant district forester at Tuscarora told the news site. “A couple of trees were well over 100 years old. We’re trying to assess the dollar-value of the trees…”

Southern Living, July 11, 2017: Why trees change color & why they don’t

Fall makes me happy because it’s the grand consummation of what people and plants have been laboring for all year. People harvest alfalfa, soybeans, sweet potatoes, and apples. Fall flowers bloom to set seed to beget a new generation next year. Trees and shrubs glow school bus-yellow, pumpkin-orange, and stoplight-red as they retrieve nutrients made in their leaves that summer. But it’s the same fall color that drives me nuts. Every year at  Southern Living, we zoom all over the South, trying to capture beautiful images of fall foliage at its peak. And no one — and I mean no one — can tell you if the fall color will be good this year and when the peak will happen. There’s no more sinking feeling than flying somewhere to photograph fall foliage, come in for the landing, look out the window, and see nothing but green, green, green…

Atlanta, Georgia, Saporta Report, July 10, 2017: A growing chorus: Atlanta must be proactive to preserve its unique tree canopy

A groundswell of community leaders are doing all they can to make sure Joni Mitchell’s song “Big Yellow Taxi” doesn’t become Atlanta’s reality.

The song’s chorus feels all too familiar… Atlanta is uniquely positioned as a city in a forest, and there is a movement afoot to make sure it stays that way. “It’s clear to me there is more concern today about tree loss than I’ve seen in 20 years,” said Greg Levine, Trees Atlanta’s co-executive director and chief program officer. “It could be a paradigm shift.” Kathryn Kolb, an expert on Atlanta’s old growth forests and director of Eco-Addendum, said this could be our city’s defining moment. “The opportunity is here to turn the tide on how we develop our city,” Kolb said. “If we turn the tide, Atlanta will be an international model on how to have dense development and retain the natural landscape and our green amenities. “If we don’t, Atlanta will not be a pleasant place to live…”

Total Landscape Care, July 10, 2017: Banned Japanese barberry tree to be sold in New York once again

The Japanese barberry tree, a popular landscaping shrub with attractive flowers, was banned from sale in the state of New York in the spring of 2015. The Japanese barberry tree is one of the 11 plants on the state’s banned invasives list, but it will soon be returning to nurseries because of research done by the University of Connecticut. The return will likely take place in the next year. The research states that without seeds, the plant is unable to spread and therefore renders new variants of the plant sterile. Barberries, scientifically known as Berberis thundbergii, are attractive spiny shrubs that are easy to grow and popular among many homeowners and landscapers, according to the Times Union. Recently, New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation approved the sale of four sterile versions of the Japanese barberry plant, along with two versions of winter creeper and Chinese silvergrass…

Seattle, Washington, Times, July 10, 2017: Sustainable forestry: It’s more than just planting trees

The forestry industry has come a long way since the mid-19th century.  Working forests are now an important part of our landscape because they support the economy and provide habitat and protect clean water while the trees grow for 40-60 years before the next harvest cycle.  When managed responsibly, sustainable forestry can meet a wide range of needs for people and the planet forever. “Sustainable forestry involves a renewable cycle of harvesting what we plant,” says Mark Doumit, Washington Forest Protection Association. “It means caring for our forest resources, providing fish and wildlife habitat, and protecting clean air and water.  At the same time, we provide jobs for rural economies and renewable wood products.” The first American Tree Farm was designated in 1941, near Montesano, Washington, to promote a renewable cycle of sustainable forestry. Today, nearly all harvested logs are from second- or third-growth forest…

Atchison, Kansas, Globe, July 10, 2017: Summer tree care

Summer has hit with a vengeance. Once adequate soil moisture levels have been reduced and summer rains in many areas have thus far been inadequate to meet the needs of landscape plants. Watering is key towards maintaining trees in our landscape. While most mature trees will have an adequate root system to explore moisture from a wide enough area to keep them nice and green, younger trees do not and will likely require some special care. For example, newly transplanted trees need at least 10 gallons of water a week to keep them going. Two and three-year-old trees that are still getting established may require even more. The challenge: getting water where it needs to be. Trees perform best when they have deep, but infrequent water applications. Try to get water to soak deeply in to the soil. This keeps evaporation levels low, making water available to trees over a longer period. Try using a small hole in a five-gallon bucket or a perforated soaker hose (water distribution can be helped with these hoses by hooking both ends together with a Y-adapter to equalize pressure) to allow for slower applications that can soak in to the soil’s subsurface layer. If soil is hard, consider a light tillage of some sort to rough up the surface, with an eye towards increasing infiltration. If even these slow watering methods result in surface runoff, consider reducing the watering rate even further or building a berm around the base of the tree (make sure it’s at least 4 feet in diameter) to allow water to percolate in to the soil profile before running off…

Palm Beach, Florida, Post, July 9, 2017: 1 beetle may have brought lethal tree disease now across SE

A lone female fungus-farming beetle inadvertently imported to Georgia may have been the source of a disease that has killed some 300 million redbay trees and threatens Florida’s avocado groves, researchers from Mississippi and Florida say. Clones of the beetle and her fungus have spread west into Texas and north to North Carolina over the past 15 years, said researcher John Riggins of the Mississippi State University Extension Service. He said they could spread nearly to Canada on sassafras, the source of the powder used to thicken filé gumbo. “Filé and guacamole could definitely be endangered,” Riggins said Wednesday. Bay leaves used for cooking could also face problems if this species gets into the Mediterranean areas where bay laurels are cultivated and grow wild, say Jason Smith and other University of Florida researchers…

Seattle, Washington, Times, July 9, 2017: Burien startup Phytelligence avoids getting dirty with its tree-growing technology

Trees generally grow in soil, but a Burien biotech startup thinks they just might grow better in gel. Phytelligence has developed a way for trees, most commonly fruit trees, to grow during their early days in a nutrient rich gel. It provides a sterile environment to cut down on viruses that might attack the plant and to make sure that all trees of one variety are uniform. Orchards can be a risky business that take a long time to reach fruition — often taking 10 years, said Phytelligence CEO Ken Hunt. Trees grown in soil and sold to farmers can also become damaged during transplanting. Phytelligence’s technology aims to cut down on tree-mortality rates and make it easier for farmers to grow more plants, more quickly in gel with custom nutrients for each plant variety…

Reuters, July 10, 2017: British forest pumped full of CO2 to test tree absorption

Researchers at a British University have embarked on a decade-long experiment that will pump a forest full of carbon dioxide to measure how it copes with rising levels of the gas – a key driver of climate change. The Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment at the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR) will expose a fenced-off section of mature woodland – in Norbury Park in Staffordshire, West Midlands – to levels of CO2 that experts predict will be prevalent in 2050. Scientists aim to measure the forest’s capacity to capture carbon released by fossil fuel burning, and answer questions about their capacity to absorb carbon pollution long-term. “(Forests) happily take a bit more CO2 because that’s their main nutrient. But we don’t know how much more and whether they can do that indefinitely”, BIFoR co-director Michael Tausz told Reuters…

Better Homes & Gardens, July 10, 2017: 10 Outstanding Evergreen Trees for Privacy

They’re friendlier than a stockade fence, cheaper than a wall, and prettier than lattice. What are they? Evergreens. You’ll find they offer plenty of privacy…and a whole lot more. Here are 10 great conifer candidates for evergreen landscaping…

Sarasota, Florida, WWSB-TV, July 6, 2017: Citizen advisory board to decide how Sarasota handles tree removals

In Tammy Kovar’s Sarasota office of her company Biological Tree Services, you’ll find two binders: one for city of Sarasota tree ordinances, and another for every other city and county. “The city of Sarasota is pretty well known for its extensive library of code,” says Kovar. However, that library still has no answer to appease residents, who feel the code is too light on tree removal, and builders who often feel the code is too strict. “Every tree is different and every location of every tree is different, and there are a lot of factors to consider when you’re looking at a piece of property,” adds Kovar. “I think the trees need a voice.” The new voice for the trees will be a team of seven locals to revamp their code on tree mitigation and other rules. The team will consist of two neighborhood leaders, two people with development interests, a downtown core resident, a chamber of commerce member or business owner, and an arborist…

Kaua’i, Hawaii, The Garden Island, July 6, 2017: Research investigates how to fight rapid Hawaii tree death

A county funded community collaboration in Hawaii aims to find new solutions to a fungal disease that is attacking and killing ohia, the most abundant native tree in the state. The Malama Ohia initiative is in its preliminary stages, starting with a research project investigating effects of applying a spray of indigenous microorganisms to ohia trees to see whether the spray boosts a tree’s resistance to the Ceratocystis fungus that causes rapid ohia death. Rapid ohia death has affected more than 117 sq. miles (303 sq. kilometers) of trees on the main island of Hawaii, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported. Researchers continue working on several initiatives to understand how Ceratocystis moves through individual trees and spreads throughout forests…

Richmond, Virginia, WTVR-TV, July 6, 2017: Richmond woman frustrated by neighbor’s overgrown tree

A Richmond woman contacted the CBS 6 Problem Solvers about her neighbor’s overgrown tree, that she said has created several safety issues. Felicia Whitaker lives off Mechanicsville Turnpike. She said the limbs from her neighbor’s tree have grown so long that they droop to the ground in her back yard. Not only does it take up space, she said that in the past year she’s had to pay money to manage the mess. She is worried about her son’s safety and she’s concerned that the power flickers on and off when it’s windy “because tree limbs are entangled in the wires. I’ve had to have the roof replaced and had holes in the roof because of the branches that fall on top of my home,” Whitaker said. “Right now my back yard is unusable, it’s overgrown from neighbor’s back yard.” Whitaker said after several attempts to get her neighbor to cut the limbs, he sent a crew to do the work but they only cut limbs over his property, not hers…

Spokane, Washington, KREM-TV, July 6, 2017: Judge dismisses a complaint against a golf company in the South Hill tree case

A judge granted a motion to dismiss a complaint against a golf company in the South Hill Bluff tree lawsuit. In April, a mile stretch of road was bulldozed near the Qualchan Golf Course. Avista, the City of Spokane parks department and a golf organization called First Tee were involved in this project, but each has denied giving the go ahead for the tree removal. Some of the land bulldozed belonged to private owners who filed a lawsuit against the contractors who did the work. The contractor turned around and filed a third party complaint naming First Tee in the suit. It was revealed today that the judge granted a motion to dismiss the complaint against the golf company…

Salisbury, North Carolina, Post, July 6, 2017: Want to start a tree farm? Some tips

North Carolina is blessed with abundant forest land that makes valuable contributions to the quality of life and the state’s economy. More than 90 percent of these forests are privately owned; private, non-industrial landowners own roughly 75 percent of these forests. Tree farms are more than pine plantations or Christmas tree farms. Tree farms are varied in nature and contain many different habitats and stages of forest regeneration, from seedlings to mature timber. The American Tree Farming System (ATFS) was established in response to concerns that America’s private forests were being cut at unsustainable rates without reforestation. It all began in 1941 when the first tree farm was designated in Washington State. The tree farm’s purpose was to demonstrate sound forest management practices to area landowners…

Fresno, California, Bee, July 6, 2017: Watch out for falling tree branches and other tree maintenance tips

A hot windless summer morning. A really loud crashing sound. The street behind our house is completely blocked by a huge oak branch that has just fallen, crushing a parked car. Neighbors and I walk up to the shattered branch to take a look. The limb is enormous – at least 20 feet long and 3 to 4 feet in diameter. The valley oak tree that the limb fell from is over 30 feet tall and appears to be healthy (green leaves, no branch or tip dieback). The branch had broken off about 5 feet from the trunk and it wasn’t a clean break. Both ends of the oak limb are jagged and torn. No signs of disease, insects or rot. Sudden limb drop, sometimes called summer branch drop, is common in our climate zone. On hot windless days, large heavy branches from mature trees (especially oaks, Southern magnolias and eucalyptus) will suddenly crash to the ground with no apparent cause. The breaks typically are not clean – the branch splits unevenly, 3 to 12 feet from the trunk. Long horizontal branches drop most often. No definitive cause for sudden limb drop has been discovered yet. Theories on possible causes include loss or movement of water within the tree and higher concentrations of ethylene gas…

Technology.org, July 5, 2017: Tree pump system can drive robots of the future

Just as humans have arteries and veins that transport blood from the heart out to tissue and back again, plants have two types of tissues that transport water up to the leaves—and nutrients down to the roots. However, unlike humans, plants do not have a pumping muscle. Other physical principles must therefore come into play in order to produce the same effect. Together with researchers from MIT and Cornell University, Associate Professor Kaare Hartvig Jensen from DTU Physics has described a new model in the journal Nature Plants, explaining where the considerable forces required to transport water in a tree come from. By means of photosynthesis in the leaves, sunlight, CO2 from the air, and water from the roots combine to produce the sugars the tree needs for nourishment. The waste product is the oxygen we breathe. Following photosynthesis, the substances have to be transported around the vascular system. Small plants have small membrane pumps in their cells which use energy to pump the sugar into the tissue. “Trees, however, do not, and given their size, you would expect them to need pumps capable of creating extremely high pressure,” says Kaare Hartvig Jensen. To explain this phenomenon, the researchers have created a chip that imitates the tree’s ‘pump mechanism’, which is a purely physical process—namely diffusion…

Lansing, Michigan, State Journal, July 4, 2017: East Lansing resident upset over tree trimming debris

An East Lansing resident isn’t pleased with her newly chopped trees. But she’s angrier about the wood chunks and logs left behind. Elaine Kristelis, a resident of the Whitehills Neighborhood, said tree trimming crews working for the Lansing Board of Water & Light cut trees lining her backyard Tuesday and left piles of wood and logs behind. BWL provided a list of wood salvagers, Kristelis said, but none of them needed the logs. “They’re passing the buck and the expense and their responsibility and all the grief that goes with it,” Kristelis said. BWL spokeswoman Amy Adamy said crews chip branches smaller than a 4 inches in diameter. But anything larger is cut into manageable sizes and left where the tree was cut

Ashland, Oregon, Mail-Tribune, July 5, 2017: Ashland controlled fire burns too hot, kills legacy trees

A reddish patch of forestland high above Ashland is a scarlet example that, when it comes to burning, foresters still have some learning to do. The 65-acre patch intentionally set off June 6 as part of the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project burned hotter than intended, resulting in scorched portions of the forest canopy and an unknown number of dead or dying trees that the controlled burn was supposed to enhance, authorities said. Those dead trees include some large “legacy trees” whose progress has been under study here in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest near Horn Gap, in an area visible to hikers and mountain bikers on Forest Service Road 400 along the No-Candies Trail — and even to motorists on Interstate 5. “We got more scorched trees than we wanted,” said Don Boucher, Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project manager. “Some will live. Some will die.” The scorched area represents about one-fourth of the nearly 250 acres burned this spring as part of the AFR project, which used fire, logging and commercial brush-thinning to improve nearly 7,600 acres of the Ashland watershed while reducing wildfire threats…

Mental Floss, July 3, 2017: Washington, D.C. residents pay tribute to fallen 325-year-old oak tree

Washington, D.C. is perhaps most famous for its historic monuments and buildings, but residents of the city’s Northwest quadrant recently took time to mourn the death of a centuries-old tree, according to NPR. The sturdy red oak in D.C.’s Shepherd Park neighborhood was 75 feet tall and its trunk was 5.5 feet wide, with sweeping branches that soared over the porch of an adjacent home. Experts believe it first took root in the late 1600s, making it around 325 years old. Washington, D.C. wasn’t founded until 1790, so the tree predated the creation of the city. Over the centuries, it stood tall amid countless wars, presidents, and national triumphs and tragedies—but it recently fell victim to the ravages of time and gravity when a large section of its cracked trunk splintered off and fell to the ground. Nobody was injured and property damage was minimal, but the arduous cleanup process took a six-member crew eight hours to complete, according to The Washington Post. They deployed a 100-ton crane to remove the tree—a job that cost $12,000, as two of the tree’s base parts weighed 17,000 pounds and 14,000 pounds, respectively…

Wildfire Today, July 2, 2017: Tree falling on dozer starts fire in Colorado

The Mill Creek Fire in Colorado started Saturday when a tree fell on a bulldozer that was working in the area, according to a spokesperson from the West Routt Fire Protection District. The dozer was destroyed as the blaze spread northwest of Pilot Knob near Routt County Road 80. The fire is 13 miles northeast of Hayden and 20 miles northwest of Steamboat Springs. As of Saturday night 116 acres had burned. Steamboat Today reported that two hotshot crews will be assigned on Sunday…

San Diego, California, Union Tribune, July 1, 2017: Invasive weevil spreads north, could cause widespread tree deaths

An invasive beetle that crossed from Mexico into southern San Diego County more than five years ago is continuing to head north, threatening widespread destruction of ornamental palm trees and date palms that could add up to millions of dollars in damage. “It has already killed hundreds of Canary Island date palms in Tijuana and parts of San Diego County,” Mark Hoddle, director of the Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside, said in a statement this past week. “We are on the verge of a major crisis for California’s palms.” The South American Palm Weevil can now be found as far north as Bonita and along the border with Mexico as far east as Texas, according to San Diego County officials. The financial harm this flying pest inflicts would rise significantly if it reaches date farms in the Imperial and Coachella valleys, Hoddle said. The weevil can wreak havoc on date palms, Canary Island date palms, coconut palms, African oil palms, sago palms and Washingtonia fan palms…

Dallas, Texas, Morning News, July 3, 2017: Don’t be fooled into thinking that pruning is always good for trees

Trees usually don’t need much pruning, but when they do it should be done properly. Most pruning is done for your benefit, not for the tree. If limbs are against the house, in your way, or if more light is needed for plants under trees, OK. But don’t be fooled into thinking that it is always good for the tree. Landscape trees rarely need much pruning. When a tree is drastically thinned, artificially lifted or severely cut back, damage is done. A good rule of thumb for trimming trees is to preserve the natural character. Pruning a tree into an artificial shape is a waste of money, has ugly results, and is usually detrimental to the health of the plant. If you can’t decide whether to trim or not, don’t…

Perryville, Missouri, Republic Monitor, June 28, 2017: Trees, saws, ladders don’t mix

In February 2016, a homeowner was seriously injured after falling from a ladder while trimming branches from a tree in Frederick, Okla.  The man was using a chain saw to trim broken limbs from the trees around his home. One of the limbs he severed fell into his ladder, knocking it over and causing the man to fall 12 feet to the ground.  The man was discovered by a neighbor, lying face down in the yard beneath the tree. The badly bent ladder and chain saw were strewn on the ground nearby.  He was taken by helicopter to OU Medical Center due to the nature of his injuries. “This story is, unfortunately, not an isolated incident” says Tchukki Andersen, Board Certified Master Arborist, Certified Tree Safety Professional and staff arborist for the Tree Care Industry Association. “There are many stories in the news media each year depicting the sad details of homeowners getting severely injured or killed by attempting to manage large tree limbs on their own. “Tree work, while appearing fairly straightforward and simple, is actually extremely complicated and technical. There is so much to understand about removing live or hanging tree branches, and it is not at all like cutting up firewood on the ground with a chain saw…”

San Antonio, Texas, KXAN-TV, June 28, 2017: Governor puts momentum behind tree removal law; Austin leaders opposed

Gov. Greg Abbott announced Wednesday that he has tapped State Sen. Bob Hall and State Rep. Paul Workman to write a law that would “prevent cities from regulating what property owners do with trees on private land.” Austin city leaders responded to this announcement saying they opposed the law and felt that other issues should take priority. During his announcement of the special session, Gov. Abbott identified curbing municipal tree removal regulations as one of the 20 items to be added to the special session agenda. “Tree removal is important in Texas because we are a conservative state and we believe in people’s individual liberties and part of that is private property rights,” said Rep. Workman, whose district covers western and southern Travis County. “And so we believe that people should have that right to remove a tree off their own property, the government shouldn’t be interfering with their property and their ability to do what they choose…”

Baker City, Oregon, Herald, June 28, 2017: Massive tree taken down

A tree that might have been a seedling when the first wagon train of emigrants traveled through the Baker Valley on the Oregon Trail came down Tuesday. The severely rotted cottonwood, which might have been as old as 180 years, stood at the corner of Resort and Campbell streets, next to the Baker County Library’s parking lot.  Ed Adamson, the library district’s facilities maintenance manager, said he had initially hoped to stabilize the tree.  But the techniques he’s used to repair a birch tree, involving concrete and wires, were not suitable for the much taller and thicker cottonwood, Adamson said.  Baker City’s Tree Board, along with two certified arborists, examined the cottonwood in May after Adamson asked the city about the library district’s options, said Jennifer Murphy of the city staff. Workers inserted metal rebar into a cavity in the tree’s main trunk, and the rebar penetrated at least one foot. In addition, bores made into two of the tree’s other trunks showed significant amounts of rot…

Lafayette, Louisiana, KLFY-TV, June 28, 2017: LUS works to resolve tree trimming concerns voiced by Lafayette residents

Lafayette residents who claim workers trimming trees for LUS are improperly trimming trees on their property.  On Tuesday, concerned Lafayette residents voiced their concerns at a Town Hall Meeting. The Director of Lafayette Utility System, Terry Huval says the utility system is strong because the trimming program removes trees limbs from power lines. Trimming provides the best impact towards the reliability of the system.  Huval says he heard the concerns of residents and will work towards a resolution. The president of the Sterling Grove Neighborhood Association, Dr. Olivier Chatelain de Pronville of S.G.N.A describes how the trees have been trimmed in his neighborhood.  “It used to be a canopy over the street you know,” says Dr. Chatelain de Pronville of Lafayette. Dr. Chatelain de Pronville says he heard about the suspension of tree trimming services in the Saint Street areas and other Oak Tree populated neighborhoods — until something can be figured out. “We’ll look it’s half.  Look how far it goes on one side.  That tree used to be over the street and now it’s just that left,” explains Dr. Chatelain de Pronville…

Monrovia, California, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, June 28, 2017: Sycamore trees at Baldwin Park City Hall treated against pesky beetle

Experts with a company working to save trees from an invasive tree beetle injected a special treatment into sycamore trees outside Baldwin Park City Hall Wednesday. The treatment is expected to provide protection against the polyphagous shot hole borer for up to two years. Made up of Propizol (propiconazole), a systemic fungicide, and TREE-age (emamectin benzoate), a general use pesticide, the treatment is injected directly into a tree’s vascular system and not in the air or soil. The treatment was developed and provided free to the city by the Massachusetts-based company Arborjet. The polyphagous shot hole borer is an invasive, tiny beetle about 0.05 to 0.1 inch in length that tunnels into trees and creates fusarium euwallacea, a fungus that blocks the flow of water and nutrients in the tree, leading to canopy die-off or death by starvation. The beetle attacks many species of trees, including sycamores, maples, oaks, willows, alders and avocado trees…

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Post-Gazette, June 27, 2017: Tree sitters seek to prevent Sunoco from working on a pipeline in Huntingdon County

Since March, tree sitters on Ellen and Stephen Gerhart’s 27-acre wood lot have been perched on their piney platforms, 50 feet in the air, to protest, oppose and block construction of Sunoco’s Mariner East 2 pipeline. They might be coming down soon if Sunoco has its way. On Tuesday morning, Sunoco attorney Alan Boynton asked Huntingdon County Common Pleas Court Judge George Zanic for an injunction that would allow the company to call in county sheriffs to remove the protesters and their tree stands. Mr. Boynton told the court that it is the clear intent of pipeline opponents to block construction. Judge Zanic said he would rule on the injunction request within 48 hours. If granted, the injunction would restrain the Gerharts and their supporters at what has been dubbed “Camp White Pine” from interfering with clearcutting on the 3.2 acre right-of-way and installation of two 24-inch pipelines on the easement Sunoco acquired through an eminent domain claim in January 2016…

Time Magazine, June 27, 2017: Republican lawmaker blames ‘Tree Huggers’ for raging wildfire in Utah

Insisting that logging could have cleaned up dead, bug-infested trees that are fueling a Utah wildfire, a Republican state lawmaker blamed federal mismanagement and lawsuits by “tree hugger” environmentalists for the blaze that has burned 13 homes and forced the evacuation of 1,500 people. A conservation group called that contention “shameful” and misleading, saying it fails to take into account climate change and drought. In addition, a U.S. Forest Service researcher said logging probably would not have made a big difference in the high-altitude fire that is sending embers from tree-to-tree over long distances — normal for the ecosystem…

Santa Barbara, California, KEYT-TV, June 27, 2017: Cajun Kitchen responds to removal of ficus tree at their new property

A controversial landscaping project in Goleta had the city crying foul. Cajun Kitchen, a highly popular breakfast and lunch local chain, recently acquired the old Rusty’s Pizza property near the intersection of Fairview Avenue and Calle Real. As part of the business’ landscaping project, a ficus tree deemed dangerous and damaging to the property by the owners of Cajun Kitchen was removed with two other trees expected to come down soon after. However, BeAnne Dato, a Goleta resident who lives nearby and said she has admired those ficus trees every day, reported the tree cut down to Goleta city officials who immediately intervened…

Torrance, California, Daily Breeze, June 27, 2017: South Bay ficus trees at risk of contracting fungal disease

Tens of thousands of ficus trees throughout Southern California are susceptible to a new, deadly fungal strain that kills at alarming speed and threatens to destroy the urban forest in older cities known for their tree-lined streets, scientists say. Branch dieback disease caused by botryosphaeria fungus already has infected more than 25 percent of the region’s ficus trees, also know as Indian laurel-leaf fig, said Donald Hodel, researcher and horticultural adviser for the University of California Cooperative Extension in Los Angeles. Because of the disease’s rapid spread, all of the region’s ficus trees could die in 10 to 30 years, leaving cities with the incredibly expensive task of removing them and planting new trees. More importantly, the wiping out of ficus microcarpa would end a 70-year legacy of mature shade trees at a time when scientists say global warming is sending temperatures to record highs…

Troy, Alabama, Messenger, June 27, 2017: Sutton stumped by stolen trees

Nothing much surprises John Sutton of Brundidge. But when he found that several trees in his pecan orchard had been stolen this weekend, he could only scratch his head and wonder: who and why? He felt a little “ill at ease” calling the Brundidge Police Station to report a theft of property on Sunday morning, after discovering that four trees had been stolen from his carefully cultivated pecan orchard on Highway 10. Normally, he would have been angry but he was more puzzled – maybe even amused – and almost hesitant to report that someone had stolen his pecan trees. Sutton said when he made the report the response was “they’ll steal anything these days…”

Eugene, Oregon, Register-Standard, June 27, 2017: Transplanted: Large Idaho sequoia tree finds new home

A large sequoia tree with a history rooted in conservation was standing in the way of progress. So, on Sunday, it was moved. More than a century after it was planted as a sapling in a doctor’s yard in Boise, Idaho, the 10-story tree was shifted across the street to make way for a hospital expansion. The tree reached its new turf Sunday morning. Crews started rolling the tree down Fort Street at 1 a.m., said Anita Kissée, a spokeswoman for St. Luke’s Health System. Once it reached its destination, crews had a bit of trouble because the inflation tubes that carried it were too long for the hole that had been dug, Kissée said. They made the hole bigger and placed the tree in at about 11:15 a.m. The movers plan to let the tree settle overnight and work on leveling it on Monday, she said. They’ll also move a lot of the soil from the original site to help the tree adapt, she said…

Gilroy, California, Dispatch, June 26, 2017: Tree hugging

None of the trees the City of Gilroy wants to cut down need to be immediately removed, according to a local certified arborist who reviewed the city’s list of 235 trees it has identified for felling due to public safety reasons. The statement, by Moki Smith, founder and lead arborist for Smith Tree Specialists, Inc., which serves over 1,500 customers in the tri-county area, was part of a declaration submitted in support of a preliminary injunction filed with Santa Clara County Superior Court on June 14. “Of the trees that I was able to identify from the city’s list, my opinion is that none of them posed an immediate threat to public health or safety, particularly to human pedestrians or vehicles,” the statement reads. “Indeed after significant rainfall, which would cause high soil liquefaction, and high winds, in March and April, the trees on the city’s list were still standing when I surveyed them.” Attorney Laura Beaton, who represents Gilroy resident, Camille McCormack, in the lawsuit against the City, City Council and business contractor, West Coast Arborists, Inc., over its plan to remove the trees in Christmas Hill Park and citywide, said they had asked the city to halt its removal plan until the court case could be decided, but got nowhere…

Los Angeles, California, KTTV, June 26, 2017: Roman candle sparks palm tree fire

Nothing draws the neighbors out like a big palm tree fire. This one went up in flames like a ‘roman candle’ over the weekend at St Louis Street and Boyle Street in Boyle Heights. Caryn Garcia – the person who shot this video on her cell phone, and sent it to FOX 11 says the fire was started by fireworks

Charlotte, North Carolina, Charlotte Magazine, June 26, 2017: Why we need Charlotte’s tree canopy

Charlotte is revered by many for its lush urban tree canopy. In fact, it’s recognized as one of the best urban forests in the nation. As you stroll or drive through the majestic willow oak-lined Queens Road West in Myers Park, you’re experiencing an important part of our city’s towering canopy. Other neighborhoods boast similar tree-lined streets, contributing to conservation group American Forests’ 2013 recognition of Charlotte as one of the top 10 cities based on the trees’ health, the city government’s strategies for dealing with trees, and civic engagement to help preserve the canopy. We Charlotteans love our trees, and our trees seem to be happy here. But our tree canopy does a lot more than simply sit there and look pretty (though their good looks haveincreased residential property values by more than $4 million). Having urban trees helps reduce air pollution, improve air quality, lower energy costs, and reduce storm water runoff. Some fast facts…

Portland, Maine, Press-Herald, June 23, 2017: Caterpillars taking toll on trees in Cape Elizabeth, and crossing town lines

The destruction wreaked by winter moth caterpillars is readily visible along many roads in this rural seaside town, especially along Route 77 as it sweeps by Ram Island Farm, Crescent Beach State Park and Kettle Cove. What normally would be a thick green canopy over Charles E. Jordan Road, near the historic Sprague Hall Grange, is a lacy wisp of tattered leaves that allows early morning sunshine to beat on the black pavement. The leaves are so damaged, trimmed to their veins and midribs, Todd Robbins, the town’s newly appointed tree warden, must examine the bark of each tree before confirming that they are oaks. “It’s a dire situation,” Robbins said. “Thousands of trees are affected here and it’s its way into South Portland and Scarborough…”

Nashville, Tennessee, WSMV-TV, June 22, 2017: Police investigating illegal tree destruction in Cleveland

Metro Park Police are investigating a giant maple tree that was illegally chopped down in Cleveland Park, The tree was valued at more than $1,000, meaning whoever is responsible will likely face felony vandalism charges. The tree sat at the north end of Cleveland Park, next to a sidewalk at the end of North 8th Street. Within 40 feet of the tree sits two homes under construction at 1101 North 8th St. The property is owned by Tom Keesee who also owns a construction company and is building the houses. Neighbors are questioning whether Keesee is responsible for chopping down the tree because it obstructed the Nashville skyline view from his two homes…

Fox Business News, June 22, 2017: Rolling sequoia: Idaho tree tied to John Muir set for move

Not very often does a 10-story-tall, 800,000-pound landmark change locations. Especially one that’s alive. But workers in Idaho will attempt just that starting Friday. A massive sequoia sent to Boise as a small seedling by naturalist John Muir more than a century ago is now in the way of a hospital’s expansion and plans are to move it two blocks away to city property. “We’ve all got our fingers crossed that the tree is going to make it to its new location,” said Mary Grandjean, the granddaughter of an Idaho forester who received the sequoia seedlings from Muir around 1912…

Anchorage, Alaska, Daily News, June 22, 2017: Don’t plant mayday trees. Don’t even let your existing ones remain

There are too many things to write about this week, and not enough space to string them together, so let me abruptly jump around a bit. First, we just finished “invasive weed week” in Alaska and this is as good a time as any to scold, berate and excoriate those of you who are still of the mind that it is OK to plant or even maintain mayday trees … officially known as Prunus padus and, informally, European bird cherry. What? Stop immediately! This is an invasive tree. Period. It is a bully. Yes, it can be called beautiful, but so what? Stop planting them. They take over riparian areas. They produce chemicals that can kill moose. They push out native plants…

Science, June 22, 2017: Tallying the tropical toll on trees from lightning

Lightning strikes on trees are different in the tropics. When lightning hits a pine in Kentucky, where Steve Yanoviak works as a biologist at the University of Louisville, it tends to blow off the bark and sear a blackened scar into the trunk, and is nearly always fatal. But it rarely leaves a visible trace on a tropical tree. Still, lightning—many times more common in tropical than in temperate forests—does kill tropical trees in slow motion and could play a major role in rainforest health. This summer Yanoviak is back on Barro Colorado Island in the middle of the Panama Canal, armed with a network of video cameras and other sensors, to study the effects of tropical forest lightning strikes, which threaten to kill more and more trees if climate change makes thunderstorms in the region even more frequent…

Nashville, Tennessee, WKRN-TV, June 21, 2017: Tree cut down in Metro-Nashville park; Some blame developer

A tree was cut down in a Metro park, and fingers are being pointed at a local developer. News 2 received the tip Monday that a large, sugar maple tree had been chopped down in Cleveland Park. The rumor was that a developer had cut down the tree so he could have unobstructed views of the Nashville skyline from a house he was building. We reached out to the Metro Parks department, which said it first became aware of the incident on Monday. However, Metro’s horticulturalist Randall Lantz received an email warning them that a tree might be cut down days before the incident took place…

San Francisco, California, June 21, 2017: Illegally cut down a San Francisco tree and you may end up in jail

Cut down a tree without permission and go to jail. Sounds a little dramatic, but that’s the warning in San Francisco. San Francisco resident Gene Kelly is one of dozens of Noe Valley neighbors who were shocked to see the building owners at 610 Clipper Street illegally chop down an old Cypress tree in front of his apartment complex. The owners may be on the hook for $8,000, the assessed value of the Cypress tree they cut down. The city is saying pay the bill or spend time behind bars. Kelly said, “It was a very prestigious and majestic tree…”

Hartford, Connecticut, WTIC-TV, June 21, 2017: Oak trees depleted by gypsy moth caterpillars, who are moving on to maple trees and witch hazel

Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection said gypsy moth caterpillars continue to hit oaks hard in parts of eastern and central Connecticut. As their larvae deplete the oaks, they are moving on to feed on other tree species, such as maples and witch hazel, according to DEEP. DEEP said the maimaiga fungus has been reported in several towns, with initial reports of some beginning levels of die-off of the gypsy moths. The major die-off expected from the fungus has not yet been observed, but it is anticipated shortly. The cool weather earlier in the spring appears to have slowed the growth rate of the caterpillars and so delayed their moving in large numbers from the crowns of the trees down into the soil, where they will encounter the fungal spores…

San Francisco, California, Chronicle, June 21, 2017: Trees retard, don’t spread, wildfire

In September 2013, the U.S. Forest Service published an opinion that said logging eucalyptus trees would increase the risk of fire in the East Bay hills. Last year, the Federal Emergency Management Agency rescinded its $5.7 million funding to UC Berkeley and the city of Oakland for logging eucalyptus, Monterey pine and Acacia trees in our hills after a pro-eucalyptus group sued. Yet the proponents of cutting down non-native trees like blue gum eucalyptus who claim they present an extreme fire hazard continue to try to implement logging projects in the Bay Area by joining local taxpayer-funded, vegetation management groups. What they advocate will make our East Bay hills more fire prone, waste taxpayers dollars to implement fire mitigation plans that would turn our hills into the same grass-and-brush terrain that was swept over the last few years by wildland fires, such as the Rocky, Valley and Butte fires. All trees, no matter their species, reduce the risk of fire because their leaves collect moisture from the air and drip on the ground beneath. They provide shade that slow the sun’s heat from drying this moisture. They act as windbreaks, which slow down wind-whipped fire…

Gulfport, Mississippi, Sun-Herald, June 21, 2017: Saturated ground makes trees vulnerable to being uprooted

If you have a container garden planted in soil, the roots are going to suffer from lack of drainage. But so will large trees in yards, when the ground gets too saturated for their roots to hold on. With the constant bombardment of rain over days, trees and some gardens will have difficulty draining enough before the next wave of rain comes in. Large trees can suffer root compromise and topple if the ground around them is so wet the roots can’t keep it stable. “Whenever the ground gets saturated like this, it’s like sitting in a bowl of water. The roots don’t have anything to hold onto,” said Ben Kahlmus, with Fulgham’s Tree Preservation and Consultants. “The trees become top-heavy and the slightest wind can push them over.” Kahlmus and Kevin Hall, Pascagoula’s landscape and beautification expert, talked with the Sun Herald about what the Coast is facing over the next few days…

San Francisco, California, KNTV, June 20, 2017: Tree branches under risk of falling amid sweltering temperatures across Bay Area

Scorching temperatures across the Bay Area are not only sparking fires and power outages, but also affecting trees. It doesn’t take a big branch to fall and hurt someone or damage your property, and hot weather brings more limbs down than winter storms. A certified arborist told NBC Bay Area that when it’s really hot, the trees pull in as much water as they can and then can’t release it quickly enough through their leaves. The branches get heavy and that’s when they snap. The phenomenon is called evapotranspiration. Michael Young of Urban Tree Managements says that homeowners can take down branches that they can reach from the ground, but anything over 20 feet up should be left to an expert…

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Citizens Voice, June 20, 2017: Logger dies after being struck by tree

An 84-year-old Pennsylvania logger has been killed after part of a 30-inch diameter tree he was cutting fell onto him. The Luzerne County coroner says William Burger died of trauma injuries about 2 p.m. Monday. Sugarloaf Township Fire Chief Duane Hildebrand says Burger was an experienced logger who was working with his son when the tree split and part of it fell on him. The Citizens Voice reported that emergency workers had to hike to Burger and his son were after driving as far as they could on a mud-clogged logging road thanks to Monday’s storms

Orange County, New York, Chronicle, June 20, 2017: New York keeps up fight against fungus that kills oak trees

New York officials say they are taking aggressive steps to fight the spread of a devastating fungus that kills oak trees. Oak wilt has been found on trees in different parts of the state since it was first spotted in 2008 in the Albany area. The state Department of Environmental Conservation says it is dedicating four additional staffers to monitor oak wilt this summer. The agency will conduct aerial surveys in July and September over the lower Hudson Valley and the Southern Tier. There is no known treatment for oak wilt fungus other than to remove the infected trees…

Montgomery, Pennsylvania, News, June 20, 2017: Trees — a surprising answer to surging stormwater

A few months back, I was interviewing Kay Sykora, Roxborough resident and former executive director of the Manayunk Development Corp. and founder of the MDC’s Destination Schuylkill River project. We were talking about Roxborough Green, an effort in which she has been actively engaged, a community-led project to plant trees and gardens in Roxborough neighborhoods, especially in the front yards of neighbors needing advice and volunteer labor. And she noted something interesting, that Roxborough residents had long been hesitant to plant trees — their leaves fall in the autumn and their flowers drop in the spring, causing us to have to rake and bag them, and branches can fall and hit things. So Roxborough is, surprisingly, not quite as green as Manayunk below us or Chestnut Hill above us. But I’ve been meditating on another long-standing Roxborough issue, the scourge of stormwater pouring down our streets, especially in neighborhoods like Upper Roxborough where there are precious few storm drains — water flows down the edges of these streets like streams, sometimes, especially during the increasingly frequent summer thunderstorms, like whitewater. As the drama of the proposed development of the 7519 Ridge Ave. site plays out — too much density on too small a plot of land (sound familiar?) — stormwater is one of the concerns highlighted by neighbors and residents opposed to this site’s over-development. Are you, like so many in Roxborough, concerned about stormwater? If you are, here is one easy solution: Plant trees. Seriously…

New York City, The Bronx Times, June 20, 2017: Tree planting left homeowner in the pits

Residents of a Spencer Estate home are looking for compensation from the city after an attempt to plant a sidewalk tree led to thousands of dollars in home damages. The owner at 1630 Research Avenue said they knew not to dig beneath the sidewalk in front of the multi-family home, due to the fact that the underground sewer line ran close to the surface. So when a NYC Parks-hired contractor began breaking up the concrete to install a tree bed, Abiezer Moto, who lives in the second floor apartment, said he filed a 311 complaint, but said it fell on deaf ears. “The [contractor] wrote a letter back, saying the city had researched [the location] thoroughly, and it was a good place for a tree,” he said. Before a sidewalk tree is planted several city agencies and utility companies survey the site for the location of underground lines. On Thursday, May 25, just a few days after the work had been completed, the ground floor tenant started getting a sewage backup into their apartment from the toilet…

Dallas, Texas, News, June 19, 2017: Former McKinney council member takes city hall tree fight to court

A former McKinney City Council member is now in a fight against the very City Hall he used to represent, and it’s all over trees. McKinney Entertainment LLC, which is managed by former council member Don Day, is suing the city’s board of adjustment over a $44,800 fine the company was issued for cutting down 18 trees on property it owns at College Street and El Dorado Parkway. The trees were cut down as part of a trash and underbrush removal project at the site, but their removal apparently violated McKinney’s tree preservation ordinance. “No quality trees were removed and the ordinance was followed,” Day said Monday. “MELLC followed the ordinances exactly as it is published on the city website…”

Honolulu, Hawaii, Star-Advertiser, June 18, 2017: Team works to map disease killing thousands of ohia trees

A field crew is working to track the rapid ohia death fungal disease that has killed thousands of trees in Hawaii. The Hawaii Tribune-Herald reports the team visited the Hilo Forest Reserve Wednesday as a high priority portion of their mapping efforts. They say mapping is the first step toward understanding and eliminating rapid ohia death. The report says the disease has stretched over about 75,000 acres of endemic ohia trees. According to researchers, the disease has killed more than 200,000 ohia trees in the past two years. Once infected, the fungus spread through the trees’ vascular systems and cuts off access to nutrients and water. Researchers say symptoms can take months to manifest, and can kill trees in a matter of weeks once they do…

Austin, Texas, KXAN-TV, June 19, 2017: Hutto residents upset about Oncor’s tree removal

The big trees behind her backyard is the reason Jolene James moved to the new Carmel Creek Subdivision in Hutto a few months ago. The two trees behind James’ backyard were there Monday morning and when she came home for her lunch break, they were gone. “It’s extremely frustrating and it sickens me,” said James. James says Oncor started removing trees last week. The utility company is clearing a path to get all the greenery away from one of their highest-powered transmission lines. “In order to make sure this line stays safe and the people around it stay safe, is to make sure everything underneath this line which is actually within the Oncor easement, is clear,” said Kris Spears, Oncor spokesman. “We need to make sure that in the event of severe weather, there’s no potential of trees or any type of vegetation interfering with this line…”

Denver, Colorado, KMGH-TV, June 19, 2017: Arborist electrocuted in Littleton tree, power shut off to recover body

Firefighters and Xcel workers are working together to help recover the body of an arborist who died after being electrocuted in a Littleton tree. Littleton Fire Rescue officials said they responded to reports of an electrocution at 6897 South Prince Circle just after 10 a.m. Monday morning. They announced at 11 a.m. an arborist who was working in a tree died from contact with an electrical current. Rescuers said they put out a call for help to find a bucket truck, and soon after, other arborists came to help. “It looked like he had all the safety gear on, he had a helmet and was tied to the tree appropriately,” Jackie Erwin, the Littleton Fire Rescue emergency manager, said…

Fox News, June 16, 2017: Grand theft avocado: 3 arrested in $300K California theft

That’s a lot of Guacamole dip. Three California men are behind bars on grand theft avocado charges. They are accused of selling $300,000 worth of avocados without authorization from a ripening facility where they worked, according to the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department. Joseph Valenzuela, 38, Carlos Chavez, 28, and Rahim Leblanc, 30, are being held on $250,000 bail each. They were arrested Wednesday. The sheriff’s guac cops began investigating the men in May after getting a tip that they were conducting unauthorized cash sales of avocados from a Mission Produce plant in the city of Oxnard. “Everybody loves avocados,” Ventura County Sgt. John Franchi told the LA Times, adding, “We take these kinds of thefts seriously.” Officials began investigating the suspects in May, when the company’s president, Steve Barnard, was tipped off to potential thefts via customers and surveillance footage, the Times reported…

Laguna Beach, California, Indy, June 19, 2017: City to cut historic pepper tree

At its Tuesday meeting, the Laguna Beach City Council voted to cut the 135-year old tree to a “tall stump” to prevent it from falling and to plant an additional pepper tree at a cost of $40,000 on the grounds to fill the space. “I tell you this breaks my heart, and I am sure everybody in this room feels the same way,” said consulting landscape architect Bob Borthwick. In an emotional discussion over the tree’s fate, the council listened to evidence from city staff detailing the tree’s instability. Public works officials told the council that sonic tomography testing, or testing done to measure solid mass with sound waves, shows the tree is now 90% hollow. Arborists brought in to asses the tree’s health recommended it be removed to prevent it from spontaneously toppling and injuring someone…

Los Angeles, California, Times, June 18, 2017: The case of the leaning pine tree: A natural history mystery unfolds on the Central Coast

Like a lot of trees on the Cal Poly campus here, the Cook pine was tall and beautiful but not especially remarkable. At least not at first glance. But as Matt Ritter and I got a little closer, it became obvious that there was something odd about this tree. It was bent. It actually bowed slightly toward the south. Not only that, but Ritter, a Cal Poly biology professor, has recently discovered that all Cook pines, which are native to New Caledonia, a blip in the South Pacific, lean toward the equator no matter where they grow. “This has never before been seen in plants,” said Ritter, 42, a botanist who specializes in trees. But once he started looking at Cook pines, he saw them leaning everywhere, he said. “And I thought, you know, that’s weird. No trees lean to the south. It doesn’t make sense…”

Sault St. Marie, Ontario, Soo Today, June 18, 2017: Firefighters rescue 12-year-old girl by prying apart a tree

A 12-year-old girl was rescued Saturday after her leg became wedged in a tree and local firefighters used the jaws of life to get her out. On Saturday afternoon Erica Groot was playing with her sister Alicia and some neighbourhood friends in the backyard of Greenwood Public School said she and her mother Piper Lee Frech. The kids call the game ‘Grounder’— one person is ‘it’ and with their eyes closed and arms out they try to tag another player and guess their name. In the game people can hide off the ground on objects like playground equipment but if the person who’s ‘it’ says ‘grounder’ they become ‘it’. Groot said she was hiding up a tree to get away from her sister, who was getting close, and as she descended to evade her she slipped and, under the force of her falling body, the lower part of her leg got stuck at the base of the tree where two sections of trunk met in a V-shape…

Lafayette, Louisiana, KLFY-TV, June 15, 2017: LUS suspends tree trimming following customer complaints; town hall scheduled

Hurricane season is upon us and that means Lafayette Utilities System is out pruning branches of trees that may cause problems to power lines during severe weather. But residents in the Oaklawn subdivision aren’t too happy about their trees being trimmed “There has been pruning in the past, but never has it been so radical as of this year”, says Herman Mhire, Oaklawn Subdivision. Mhire has lived in Oaklawn Subdivision for more than 25 years. One of his concerns with the tree pruning is the trees not being symmetrical and being blown over during storms. “Sometimes up to 50% of the tree is removed. Usually, it’s on the street side. Where does that leave all the weight? It’s on the side of the tree facing the house…”

Dallas, Texas, News, June 15, 2017: As Gov. Abbott seeks to chop down Dallas’ ‘socialistic’ tree laws, a fear that ‘nature will be gone’

Just two weeks ago the southwest corner of Marvin D. Love Freeway and Ledbetter Drive, a few minutes’ drive south of downtown, was a long, bucolic stretch of lush green — trees that, from the road, looked like a forest that stretched into forever but actually backed up to a row of homes along tranquil Dove Creek Way.  Today, it’s nothing but an expanse of shattered stumps, the result of illegal clear-cutting… Though the item wasn’t on their agenda, City Council nevertheless spent about half an hour fretting over the damage done without a permit and a plan to replace them — and the destruction looming over the horizon if Gov. Greg Abbott gets his way in the coming special session and state lawmakers vote to outlaw more than 50 Texas cities’ laws protecting trees on private property…

Sarnia, Michigan, Journal, June 15, 2017: City seeks feedback on bylaw to regulate privately owned trees

Sarnia is preparing to bring in a tree bylaw, and residents have several ways to weigh in. Input for the controversial proposal is being gathered by city staff through public consultations, focus groups and the municipal planning website. Though Lambton County has a bylaw that covers trees in bushlots of one hectare or larger, nothing currently exists to protect individual trees or smaller lots within the city. Some residents are eager for City Hall to bring in rules to save trees from being destroyed on private property and to help expand the urban tree canopy. Others say telling homeowners what they can do with their own trees is an infringement on private property rights…

Denver, Colorado, Post, June 15, 2017: That big tree in your yard? Should it stay or should it go?

Planted in a new back yard or a revamped landscape, staked and wrapped against the elements, young trees embody optimism: some day, this twig will be big enough to cast shade. Then, just like children, they grow. You wake up to discover your baby is a 6-foot-tall high-school sophomore and your scrawny tree tops your roofline. Just like children, the bigger trees are, the more expensive their problems become. Removing a mature shade tree is a full-day job with a price tag in the thousands and permanent consequences. “It changes your landscape forever,” said Keith Timm, an arborist and landscape consultant with Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care…

Tallahassee, Florida, Democrat, June 15, 2017: Is my tree safe? Check for danger signs

In Florida, the first day of June is greeted with trepidation, as it is the first day of hurricane season. As this date approaches, seasoned veterans of hurricanes past re-stock their emergency storm supplies and worry about the trees around their houses. While Tallahassee residents appreciate the city’s abundant canopy coverage, they remember the wreckage caused by tree debris during Hurricane Hermine. Tree damage is inevitable with any major storm event, but preventative tree care can minimize this. The first step in prevention is to identify and correct an issue before it can cause a failure. These are some of the items to look for in the trees around your house…

Lafayette, Louisiana, Advertiser, June 14, 2017: Tree trimming suspended after residents complain

Residents in some Lafayette neighborhoods are so upset over the way their trees are being trimmed by a utility system contractor that a special town hall meeting is set to discuss the situation. A tree trimming service contracted by Lafayette Utilities System, has been —aggressively, some say — cutting tree branches and limbs away from electrical lines. Residents, especially those with very old, large oak trees, took to social media over the past week upset over the way their trees were cut. “The trimming that I’m seeing this year is more drastic, certainly in Oaklawn,” resident Herman Mhire told The Daily Advertiser. In some cases, he said, as much as half the leaves and foliage of live oak trees is being removed…

Cincinnati, Ohio, Enquirer, June 14, 2017: Tips on selecting a tree specialist

An arborist is an individual trained in tree care. An arborist may provide services like tree removal, pruning, fertilization, pest management, and risk assessment. In order to be a certified arborist, an individual must achieve a level of knowledge about tree care through experience and by passing a comprehensive examination developed by the nation’s leading experts on tree care. In order to retain certification, an arborist must continue one’s education in tree care and thus, are more likely to be up to date on best management practices and techniques. A certified arborist may be a member of a professional association like the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), the American Society of Consulting Arborists (ASCA), and the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA). An arborist should only perform industry-accepted practices. Improper practices like tree topping, excessive removal of live wood, and the use of climbing spikes on trees which are not being removed violate industry standards. When selecting an arborist ask and verify proof of insurance and request and check references of clients who were provided similar services by the arborist…

Phoenix, Arizona, KTVK-TV, June 14, 2017: Vandals chop down trees, leave path of destruction at community’s park

A trail of destruction was left behind at a community park in west Phoenix after someone decided to play lumberjack and chop down several trees. It happened near 103rd Avenue and Lower Buckeye Road in the Country Place master planned community sometime between Sunday night and Monday morning. “Four of the trees in this area, they were mature Ash trees were actually chopped down,” said Mary Ehlers, block watch co-leader. That’s not all. Ehlers says irrigation lines were dug up and they found broken glass beer bottles mixed in with the sand in the playground area. “I mean it’s just pure destruction and just spitefulness. It’s hard for me to comprehend,” Ehlers said…

United Green Alliance, June 14, 2017: How to spike trees

(Editor’s Note: We do not condone this type of conduct, but you ought to know what information is out there for the use of people who appoint themselves Guardians of the Galaxy, because they know more than you or I do)

Firstly, I must begin this article with a disclaimer to ensure that I do not find myself on a NSA watchlist. I do not condone the use of tree spiking unless it is absolutely necessary in defending the integrity of a forest. These techniques must be used very sparingly, or else one is bound to face legal troubles, or even jail time. Depending on where you are located, getting caught spiking trees can land you up to three years in the pen. This means that I would normally discourage this technique. However, when one is desperate, one must do everything within one’s power to protect the Earth. This may or may not involve the deliberate insertion of spikes into prospective trees to deter loggers from cutting that area. Secondly, I must say that there is one reason that we environmental activists spike trees, and one reason only. That reason is to deter foresters from logging old-growth trees. The reason that foresters would want to stray away from spiked trees would be because it is very dangerous and possibly damaging to both sawmills and chainsaws to attempt to cut into a tree that has a six inch metal spike hidden inside of it. This being said, a wise company would be unwilling to begin logging on a forest that they are very aware is spiked, Therefore, it is for the benefit of the trees that we spike them. It is for the protection of the natural world from the industrial empire that we, as environmentalists must learn this useful skill…

Ecology Letters, June 14, 2017: From competition to facilitation: how tree species respond to neighbourhood diversity

Studies on tree communities have demonstrated that species diversity can enhance forest productivity, but the driving mechanisms at the local neighbourhood level remain poorly understood. Here, we use data from a large-scale biodiversity experiment with 24 subtropical tree species to show that neighbourhood tree species richness generally promotes individual tree productivity. We found that the underlying mechanisms depend on a focal tree’s functional traits: For species with a conservative resource-use strategy diversity effects were brought about by facilitation, and for species with acquisitive traits by competitive reduction. Moreover, positive diversity effects were strongest under low competition intensity (quantified as the total basal area of neighbours) for acquisitive species, and under high competition intensity for conservative species. Our findings demonstrate that net biodiversity effects in tree communities can vary over small spatial scales, emphasising the need to consider variation in local neighbourhood interactions to better understand effects at the community level…

Atlanta, Georgia, WSB-TV, June 13, 2017: Weeks of heavy rain make trees more likely to topple

At the start of the year, nearly 50 percent of Georgia was in extreme drought. Today, none of the state is. Arborist Christy Bryant, of Gunnison Tree Service, said any drought-related impacts from last year’s drought are still at least a couple of years away. “We didn’t see trees come down until 2010 and 2011 after the historic drought of 2007. This is way too soon for these trees to be affected by the drought,” Bryant said. Trees have been toppling across metro Atlanta over the last few weeks and it’s actually been because of too much rain, Bryant said. Severe Weather Team 2 meteorologist Brian Monahan met with Bryant in a neighborhood under the dense tree canopy of southeast Atlanta. Bryant pointed to a tree covered in ivy…

Denton, Texas, Record-Chronicle, June 13, 2017: Abbott grappled with local tree regulations targeted in special session

Before he became governor of Texas, Greg Abbott was asked to replant trees on his property in Austin after a protected pecan tree there died — a regulation he has set out to axe during the upcoming special session of the Texas Legislature. Last week, Abbott called on lawmakers to prevent cities from regulating what property owners do with trees on private land as one of 20 items for a special session that will begin July 18. In interviews and public appearances, Abbott has repeatedly railed against the local regulations as a violation of private property rights, and he has pointed to his own experience as a homeowner in Austin as an impetus for the bill. “I wanted to cut down a common pecan tree in my yard, and the city of Austin told me, no, I could not cut it down and I had to pay money to the city of Austin to add more trees to my yard because I wanted to cut down one very common tree that was in a bad location,” Abbott said on WBAP Morning News last week…

The Green Sheet Farm Forum, June 13, 2017: Tree Facts: Aphids can be a problem on your trees

There are dozens of types of aphids sometimes called plant lice that can be found on shade trees. Aphids are small insects, usually about an eighth of an inch long that range in color from bright orange or red to dull gray. They feed on plants by sucking plant sap from the leaves, twigs or stems. If present in high numbers large quantities of sap are removed, reducing plant growth and vigor. Aphids feeding on new leaves can produce leaf curl injuries especially on ash trees. Most aphids excrete large quantities of a sweet, sticky substance called honeydew. At times, excessive honeydew dropping from trees can be an extreme nuisance. Sooty mold fungus may grow on the honeydew, producing a gray, unattractive covering of the leaves. Normally sooty mold does not do damage to the trees but can when it covers leaves and reduces photosynthesis. Ants are attracted to the honeydew and feed on it. Ants may even tend aphids, protecting them from natural enemies such as lady beetles and lacewings. Often the presence of ants crawling up trees or on foliage indicates that large numbers of aphids or other honeydew producers also are on the plants…

Pendleton, Oregon, East Oregonian, June 13, 2017: Tree removal underway from Rail Fire, Eagle Fire areas

Visitors to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest can expect to see crews hard at work removing burned trees from two wildfire areas in the Whitman Ranger District. The Eagle Complex, which was sparked by lightning in 2015, spread over 12,763 acres about 20 miles northwest of Richland in Baker County, while the Rail Fire swept over 41,716 acres near Unity last summer. Crews are now working to remove damaged trees that may pose a risk to hikers and campers near forest roads and trails. “Removing dangerous trees near roads and trails is part of our commitment to public safety,” said Jeff Tomac, district ranger. “We appreciate everyone’s patience while our crews are working to make post-fire areas safer for public use.” Burned areas will remain open, though visitors may experience some delays and traffic, which will be heaviest during weekdays…

Dallas, Texas, KERA-TV, June 12, 2017: Hacked trees along forest lane part of larger issue Abbott wants to tackle in special session

People were outraged after a developer butchered a slew of live oak trees on Forest Lane in northwest Dallas earlier this month. The property owner, Platinum Construction based in Fate, Texas, did not file a tree removal permit with the city of Dallas, The Dallas Morning News reports. But, if Gov. Greg Abbott has his way in the special session, the city wouldn’t be involved. Among the items for state lawmakers to tackle in July include deciding if cities like Dallas and Austin, which both have local tree ordinances in place, should continue what Abbott calls, “micromanaging what property owners do with trees on their private land…”

Directions Magazine, June 12, 2017: Bluesky launches tree failure risk tool

In partnership with the UK’s University of Lancaster, aerial mapping company Bluesky has launched a new tool which can be used to predict the likelihood of trees falling on essential infrastructure such as roads, railways and power lines. Using complex wind analysis techniques combined with geographic data from Bluesky, the model assigns a level of risk to individual trees. Accessible via a web based application, users of the TREEFALL (Tree Risk Evaluation Environment for Failure and Limb Loss) tool are expected to include transport infrastructure managers, utility companies and Local Authorities…

Redding, California, Searchlight, June 12, 2017: Loss of trees leave some stumping for stronger law

Redding has been a Tree City USA for more than 35 years. But some local environmental and nature groups say you wouldn’t know it due to the number of trees being felled here for the sake of possible development. Although they say they are not opposed to development, they also say Redding leaders need to strengthen the city’s tree ordinance to better protect its native and urban trees, which help to beautify the city. “I think pretty matters,” said Dan Greaney chairman of the Wintu Audubon Society…

Treehugger.com, June 12, 2017: City trees suffer from not getting enough sleep

From the “Trees, They’re Just Like Us!” department, my favorite forester has weighed in on an issue I have long suspected: Urban trees, like much of the natural world, have a hard time when the lights are left on all night. “They also have to sleep at night,” Peter Wohlleben told the audience at the Hay Festival of Literature in Wales. “Research shows that trees near street lights die earlier. Like burning a lamp in your bedroom at night, it is not good for you.” And if anyone knows trees – and embraces anthropomorphising them – it’s Wohlleben. The German forester and best-selling author doesn’t shy away from talking about trees as if they were people. “I use a very human language,” he says. “Scientific language removes all the emotion, and people don’t understand it anymore. When I say, ‘Trees suckle their children,’ everyone knows immediately what I mean…”

Duluth, Minnesota, News-Tribune, June 11, 2017: Tree clearing prompts order to restore for megachurch pastors

Pontoon cruises along one of the wildest stretches of the Mississippi River are a pastime of Lawrence and Marian Severt. Homeowners for 15 years on a lake connected to the river—Rice—the couple makes a habit of meandering to the northeast against the gentle current of the iconic waterway. They’ve come to know the arrival and departure times of migrating birds, the wild rice beds preferred by harvesters and the best spots to view bald eagle families in their nests. “It’s like almost going into another century, because things are so wild from here north,” Lawrence Severt said. On one of these trips last summer, the Severts said they were shocked to see a swath of mature trees cleared along the banks, revealing a home under construction at the pinnacle of a steep bluff. The cleared area stood in stark contrast to the landscape surrounding it. “It was clear-cut,” said Lawrence Severt. “On either side, it wasn’t touched…”

Bend, Oregon, KTVZ-TV, June 11, 2017: USFS closes Cultus Lake Campground due to hazard trees

The Deschutes National Forest said Sunday it has closed the Cultus Lake Campground and Day-Use area for the summer due to a large number of dead or diseased trees that pose a serious public safety hazard. The boat launch is still being evaluated for potential opening, a decision that’s expected to be made on Monday, officials said. “An in-depth review of tree stand health at the Cultus Lake Campground, Day-Use and boat launch areas by Hoodoo Recreation and the Forest Service uncovered at least 160 dead hazard trees and 300 diseased ‘green’ trees that might fall on a family or individual camping or recreating in the area,” the forest’s announcement said. Removing that number of trees in the Cultus Lake area will be a large project that requires an environmental analysis, officials said. A factor in the environmental analysis will be that the Cultus Lake area is within habitat identified for the northern spotted owl…

Newport, Rhode Island, Daily News, June 11, 2017: Trees stripped of bark in Miantonomi Park

Newport police are investigating the vandalism of two maple trees near the Miantonomi Memorial Park playground on the Hillside Avenue entrance that were stripped of their bark. It is not clear when the vandalism occurred; The Daily News received a call Wednesday afternoon from a member of the Tree and Open Space Commission notifying the paper of the vandalism. A similar case of vandalism took place in late May near the Aquidneck Elementary School playground in Middletown, where several maple trees were stripped clean of their bark. That investigation is still ongoing. On Friday, Newport Police Sgt. Joe Carroll said there was no information available on the case as it is still being investigated. “They were talking with Middletown detectives, but I don’t know what the status of that is,” he said…

Deep Green Permaculture, June 11, 2017: How to Kill a Tree Stump Without Poisonous Chemicals

Sometimes we need to cut down trees to remove them, but chopping trees down to the ground does not stop them putting out new growth from the stump or from the roots and eventually turning back into full sized trees again. In fact, the technique of cutting trees down to a stump and letting them regrow is called coppicing, it’s a traditional woodland management technique and many trees can be coppiced for timber harvesting or other reasons and successfully regrow.  To get rid of a tree stump, you don’t need to chop or dig it out of the ground, use expensive machine or poisonous chemicals. Why avoid chemicals marketed as “Blackberry & Brush Killer” or “Tree & Blackberry Weed Killer”? You seriously do not want to contaminate your garden with these persistent poisons…

San Jose, California, Mercury News, June 8, 2017: Removal of 110-foot tree denied by city

Menlo Park’s heritage tree ordinance survived a test this week. The City Council on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Quality Commission’s January decision that a tree at 318 Pope St. in The Willows neighborhood cannot be cut down. The Cole family had appealed the commission’s decision, arguing that the 110-foot-tall coastal redwood tree in their backyard isn’t safe. Backed by three arborists, they said the tree is so structurally damaged that large chunks could fall at any time, causing property damage and injuries to them and adjacent neighbors. Estimated to be 80 years old, the tree at an early age began growing upward in three segments instead of one, which are now possibly pushing against one another. “Trees deemed dangerous should be removed, and the time to remove them is before they kill people and destroy homes,” said Isabelle Cole, who also wants to raze a one-story home on the lot and replace it with a two-story house.

Seattle, Washington, KCPQ-TV, June 8, 2017: Arborist says Seattle needs to do more to prevent tree-falling deaths

This winter took a toll on our trees. In fact, the city of Seattle has tagged 4,500 trees they say may need to come down. The crews will start in Lincoln Park and five other parks: Seward, Schmitz, Discovery, Carkeek, and Interlaken. “Everything is gorgeous about Lincoln Park,” said grandmother Lou Largent. That’s why Largent brought her grandkids from the playground to the waterfront to the staggering trees. This is a gem of a park. “They need to keep this place safe, because it’s so beautiful and there are so many trees,” said Largent. That’s why Seattle Parks plans to cut down 91 trees in Lincoln Park. Arborist Michael Oxman says he’s spent years trying to get the city to do that more. “That defect could be grounds for concerns,” said Oxman…

Brownsville, Texas, KRGV-TV, June 8, 2017: Tree branches overtaking power lines in Hidalgo Co.

A Hidalgo County man with disabilities is concerned for his health after his neighbor’s tree keeps growing dangerously close to his power line. Mercedes resident Domingo Hernandez told Channel 5 News he sustained injuries to his arm, back, eyes and nose during a water heater explosion incident. Hernandez said after 17 surgeries and seven medical specialists, having electricity to power his air conditioning unit is a necessity. “If I get too dehydrated my kidneys could shut down,” he said. Hernandez said branches from his neighbor’s tree are putting his power in jeopardy. He fears a storm could cause the branches to disconnect his power…

Grand Rapids, Michigan, WOOD Radio, June 8, 2017: GR looks at ways to whittle dangerous tree problem

The tree on city property between the street and sidewalk in front of Dennis Frasier’s northeast Grand Rapids home has seen better days. A good wind will send its dead limbs onto his driveway from time to time. After a number of calls from Frasier, the city tagged it for removal last summer. “The city said. ‘This is a danger, it is a high priority, it has to be removed and it will be within 90 days,’” Frasier said, reading from the tag the city left on his door. But one year later, the tree is still standing. Dead and dying trees can more than just a nuisance. In May, high winds brought down a branch in Riverside Park, injuring a woman and a small child…

Pullman, Washington, Northwest Public Radio, June 7, 2017: Scientists discover the history of storms in tree rings

Turns out tree rings can do more than just tell you how old a tree is. Researchers have found they can also help track Pacific storms over centuries. That could help out water managers and climate modelers. To get that data, first Erika Wise had to collect core samples of more than 200 ponderosa pines in Washington’s Columbia Basin. “Some of the ponderosa pine trees date back to the 1400s,” Wise said. “They’re incredibly old trees, and they’re on these ridges with this view of Yakima down below.” Wise is an associate professor of geography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the lead author of the report. It was published in Science Advances…

Greensboro, North Carolina, WFMY-TV, June 7, 2017: BBB: Beware of this tree trimmer

Consumers say they paid Jim or James Shrewsbury upfront for trimming trees, grinding stumps and removing limbs. But they say he either didn’t finish the work or never even started the jobs. In total, BBB has six complaints against the business since October 2016. The business did not responded to any of the complaints. The BBB has reason to believe Arbor Tech may be linked to Curb Appeal Custom Tree Care. BBB has eight unanswered complaints from 2016 alone about Curb Appeal Custom Tree Care…

Des Moines, Iowa, Register, June 7, 2017: Iowa’s oak trees are sick, and some contend farm chemicals are to blame

Iowa’s state tree is under stress. Visible damage to oak trees in recent years may be caused by farm chemicals, forestry experts say. Nearly a thousand Iowans have contacted the Iowa Department of Natural Resources this spring after noticing the leaves on their oaks appear to be eaten by insects nearly down to the veins, a problem exacerbated this year because of weather fluctuations. The good news: the trouble isn’t with insects. The bad news: There’s not much you can do about it, unless herbicide applied to corn and soybean fields is stopped, according to a DNR district forester. “If that chemical was not there, this wouldn’t happen, if you believe the research,” said Mark Vitosh, who is based in Johnson County…

Los Angeles, California, Daily News, June 7, 2017: Dozens of trees ‘decimated’ at historic LA apartments despite landmark status

Barry Cullison stared at a 3-foot-wide tree stump that once bore the weight of a pine at least six stories tall. Across the historic Chase Knolls Garden Apartments where he lives, dozens of other mature trees were being cut down: eucalyptus, ficus, liquidambar, jacaranda, magnolia and more. “It’s heartbreaking,” said Cullison, 70, a retired actor who has lived at the Chase Knolls complex for 21 years. “This can’t be undone. They’ve decimated the trees. The trees are coming down. And all we can do is listen to the chain saws…”

Skagit County, Washington, Skagit Valley Herald, June 6, 2017: Sedro-Woolley police investigate felled tree

Sedro-Woolley police are seeking tips after a tree along the Cascade Trail just outside Sedro-Woolley was chopped down over the weekend. The felled maple tree, which was hacked with an ax, had been planted in memory of George C. Bricka Jr. Bricka was a well-respected member of the community, Sedro-Woolley Mayor Keith Wagoner said. “It’s a despicable and cowardly act,” Wagoner said of the incident. “Whether it was targeted or not, it’s equivalent to grave desecration because it’s a memorial. We don’t want to see anything more like this.” Trees were planted along the trail about five years ago by members of the Sedro-Woolley Rotary Club, said Larry Campbell, who planted the trees and has cared for them since…

Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, June 6, 2017: Northbrook committee OKs 1 man’s tree-cutting plan, axes another’s

Northbrook committee recently recommended that one man be allowed to cut down five protected “landmark trees” to build a house and a swimming pool, while recommending denying another man permission to remove a protected tree he said provides shade for mosquitoes to breed. The first man, Ross Freeman, will have to pay more than $12,000 to solve his construction-space problems and build his pool, and Muhammad A. Zeeshan, the second man, has been promised $3,500 from the village to help him drain his yard and cut down the mosquito population. Village officials also said Zeeshan has already cut down 17 of the 18 trees in his backyard. The tree recommendations came in a Northbrook Village Board Public Works Committee session scheduled to handle the two tree protection and preservation ordinance appeals. Zeeshan, of the 2000 block of Illinois Road, had asked in 2015, and again a few months ago, to cut down a 20-inch-thick American linden tree that stands in the center of his backyard. He was rejected two years ago, and advised to trim, but not cut down, the tree, estimated to be nearly 100 years old. Otherwise, he would have to pay $3,000 —$150 per inch — to take it down. He wanted to cut it down and have the fee waived…

Outdoor News, June 6, 2017: Two charged with felony for theft of trees in Iowa

Are no trees safe in the Northland? If it’s not emerald ash borers destroying ash trees across the Upper Midwest — and beyond — it’s people illegally cutting down and stealing birch trees. And now walnut trees. According to a news release by the Iowa DNR, its Natural Resources Law Enforcement Bureau recently charged two men with cutting down and selling walnut trees from a state-owned park. Bradley Lynn Hagerman, 38, of Pisgah, Iowa, and Eric Robert Freihage, 30, of Council Bluffs, are both charged with one count of second-degree theft, a class D Felony, Iowa Code 714.2(2); timber buyer – bond or accounting violation, a serious misdemeanor, Iowa Code 456A.36(5); and timber buyer violation, a serious misdemeanor, Iowa Code 456A.36(3). Hagerman and Freihage admitted to a DNR conservation officer that they transported and sold nine walnut trees between January 24, 2017 and January 30, 2017.  The live trees were cut down by Freihage and Hagerman at Loess Hills State Forest, a state-owned and DNR-managed park near Pisgah…

Salina, Kansas, Journal, June 6, 2017: How to tell if a tree is healthy

Trees continue to be a hot topic with gardeners and homeowners in 2017, and with good reason. Damage still is appearing and in many cases worsening from past environmental stresses trees have encountered. This may be seen as branches dying back, tops of trees dying or a slow decline in tree appearance and health.Even if a tree isn’t showing any symptoms of decline it is a good idea to be aware of what clues can be used to tell if a tree is healthy or under stress. One of the most important clues in determining the health of trees is the amount of new growth the tree produces. June is a great time to check since the initial spring flush of growth has already happened for most trees. A healthy tree should have a minimum of 4 to 6 inches of new growth each year. Check branches with the tips in the open and not shaded by the tree itself. Anything less than 4 inches on the majority of branches suggests the tree is under a great deal of stress…

Omaha, Nebraska, WOWT-TV, June 5, 2017: Tree removal job doesn’t cut it with city

A huge, but dying cottonwood that cast a shadow of danger in a south mid-town Omaha neighborhood has been cut down by a private tree contractor. The way the contractor went about it raised concerns for city inspectors and utilities. It’s a lesson in notification for all contractors. Long before “timber” — a tree contractor should provide warnings that a neighbor told city inspectors she never got. Michelle Wing said, “They don’t talk to neighbors or ask permission. They don’t tell us they’re going to drop things into the street.” While Tree Services of Omaha removed a hollow cottonwood, a roped branch swung over and knocked the top off the next door neighbors chimney. Michelle Wing said, “I had six kids in my house, what would have happened if that came through my roof.” The next day another large branch being cut down landed across the street smashing part of another neighbors fence that Tree Services of Omaha quickly repaired. But city officials, who license arborists and tree services, arrived on scene to investigate…

Knoxville, Tennessee, WBIR-TV, June 5, 2017: Heavy rain wreaks havoc on trees, need for tree removal on the rise

After storms swept across East Tennessee over Memorial Day weekend, tree service companies have been swamped with requests. “Basically if you’ve got a truck and chainsaw you can go get work, there’s plenty of it,” Mencer’s Tree Service owner Miles Mencer joked. Mencer’s company averages 60-100 new calls each day. “You prioritize, you sit there and you know the people with trees through their house or no power, can’t get out of their driveway, those are first,” Mencer said. After four days of hard work, his team cleaned up Knox County’s The Cove at Concord Park, which sustained an estimated $150,000 of damage…

Redding, California, KRCR-TV, June 5, 2017: Redding Tree Ordinance to be discussed at City Council meeting

A group of people will address the Redding City Council Tuesday night about a number of trees being cut down in the city. Representatives from Shasta Chapter of California Native Plants Society, Shasta Group of Sierra Club, and Wintu Audubon will be making statements about the lack of enforcement of the Redding Tree Ordinance at least in regards to the spirit of the ordinance if not the letter of the ordinance. Other individuals may also be making statements. The representatives said they want to educate the City Council members on not letting dollar signs cloud their vision in relation to protecting trees and to respect the spirit of the city’s tree ordinance. They added hundreds of oak trees were practically clear-cut to make way for the Churn Creek Marketplace Shopping Center on Churn Creek Road near South Bonnyview Road. “They cut down about 700 trees and only preserved three. So that’s like less than one-half of one percent of the trees, so we want to see more trees preserved,” said David Ledger with the California Native Plant Society…

Vermont Public Radio, June 5, 2017: Tapped out? UVM studies long-term effects of sap vacuums on maple trees

Maple syrup producers have an ever-growing arsenal of high-tech tools to draw more and more sap out of the trees. Now, scientists at the University of Vermont are doing a long-term study to see if modern tapping systems are affecting the health of maple trees. Modern vacuum systems draw out about twice the amount of sap that traditional buckets collect. Abby van den Berg, an associate professor at UVM’s Proctor Maple Center, says there are no indications that modern tapping techniques hurt the trees, but researchers still want to dig deeper. “We don’t really think that we’re doing anything very much more impactful than we have always been doing, but we don’t know if we’re taking some critical component at a time that’s critical for the tree,” says van den Berg. “Those are the more detailed questions that really need to be looked at and refined…”

Cleveland, Ohio, Plain Dealer, June 4, 2017: You don’t have to hug trees to save them, you just have to have a plan

Welcome to Cleveland, the deforested city. Remember when we were called the Forest City? When we deserved it? We don’t anymore. The canopy in Cleveland is down to 19 percent. Pittsburgh and Cincinnati have double that. The satellite view of “The Land” looks like the Badlands. We’re in desperate need of some shade. Trees do all kinds of good for our health and the health of the environment. They filter pollution. Produce oxygen. Even improve our mental health. And they add character to our urban neighborhoods. It’s good that City Hall appears to be paying attention to that now. Cleveland’s urban forestry department is growing and the Cleveland Tree Plan passed by council last year calls for aggressive planting. Just last month, Mayor Frank Jackson announced a canopy goal of 30 percent by 2040. Do nothing, and it’s expected to be 14 percent by then. Planting is a great idea. But it’s just as important to save the trees we already have…

Columbus, Nebraska, Telegram, June 4, 2017: Common tree issues

Bark falling off of trees, suckers growing from the base of trees, and surface roots that make it hard to mow or even grow grass. These are common tree issues I receive questions about. Bark falling off of trunks is being reported across the state. We refer to this as bark blasting or sloughing. Ornamental pears, maples, lindens and crabapples are most affected, but we are also seeing it in other tree species. Bark falling off of otherwise healthy trees is likely due to sudden cold temperature injury to the trunk. Bark sloughing we are seeing now is most likely due to the sudden cold spell back in November 2014. At that time, we had a warm fall and then a night of sudden cold of about 5 degrees Fahrenheit. Trees were not fully dormant and the cambium layer just beneath the bark was injured by cold temperatures. If a tree is killed by a disease, such as fire blight, this too can lead to bark sloughing…

Dallas, Texas, KXAS-TV, June 2, 2017: Expert says ‘irreparable harm’ done to 75 Live Oak Trees

Workers spent the day Friday grinding up branches of what were 75 large live oak trees outside a Northwest Dallas office building. Aerial photos of the site taken earlier show dense green foliage that surrounded the building in front of a Home Depot store in the 2800 block of Forest Lane near Interstate 635 LBJ Freeway. “That’s one of the beautiful things about this area, is those trees when you come into the Home Depot parking lot,” said neighbor Rick Sanders. “Those are just beautiful, magnificent trees.” Neighbors are sad and upset about the drastic change in the appearance of those trees over the past few days. It looks like a tornado stripped all the foliage, but it was no act of nature. It was intentional work arranged by the property owner. “And the issue was, according to them, people would not be able to see the property because of the trees. And so this was their solution to it,” neighbor Justin Huse Huse said. “Anybody who knows anything about trees knows they could have pruned them from the bottom up. Keep the canopy and they would have been able to see the property just fine…”

Stump Blog, June 5, 2017: Factors that influence the price of tree removal

Trees are definitely essential for having a healthy environment around your house. But due to many reasons, a need may arise to remove a certain tree of a set of trees. Dead or dying trees, storm-damaged trees and others which hinder the appeal, safety or function of a property need to be removed. In most cases, it is necessary to remove some trees due to these reasons. The cost of tree removal varies according to the type of job to be done. Following is a general guide to tree-removal costs. If your tree is causing structural damage to your property or the surrounding properties, it definitely needs to be removed. In case it is causing a safety or navigational hazard, it should also be removed. Another hint is when you notice that your tree is sick, dying or already dead, call the tree removal serviced to remove it. The prices might seem outrageous to you, but do not worry over it. Good, reputable companies provide free estimates and consultation on tree removal. There are some factors to be considered for estimating the cost for the job…

Modesto, California, Bee, June 1, 2017: Unsolicited worker said he’d ‘fell our dead tree. He did … onto our house and car.’

A couple paid $100 to have a dead tree removed from their north Modesto front yard on Memorial Day. They now expect the botched job to cost them a few thousand. Because the itinerant tree trimmer who came by Monday – proffering a business card that reads “Integrity Tree Service, owner and operator Miguel Morales” – apparently didn’t know much about the work he was doing. The man “offered to fell our dead tree. He did … onto our house and car,” Fernview Drive resident Jack Styer posted on Nextdoor, the private social network for neighborhoods. Styer said he pointed out to Morales (we’ll call him that since it’s the name on the card) a landscape rock and a yard sprinkler and said he wanted the tree felled between them. “I told him, ‘I can fall it there, so I expect you to fall it there, or I won’t pay you.’ ” But even when the job went awry and a house gutter and the Mercedes ML350 SUV sitting in the driveway were damaged, the Styers paid Morales the $100 he’d asked…

Lowell, Massachusetts, Sun, June 1, 2017: Man hurt in fall from tree in Westford

A man fell approximately 30 feet from a tree Thursday afternoon, according to police scanner reports. The incident was reported at 15 Boutwell Hill Road. The victim appears to have suffered a fractured femur and blunt force chest trauma. He was transported via medical helicopter…

Atlanta, Georgia, Intown Paper, June 1, 2017: Plans for new city tree ordinance in the works

Plans for a new city tree ordinance are in the works in order to address problems with the current ordinance and make it easier to understand, Department of City Planning Commissioner Tim Keane said. “We absolutely have to determine how to protect old-growth forest and tree canopy,” Keane said. Tree advocates say the current law’s problems were highlighted in a recent decision to allow trees to be cut down in Peachtree Hills Park. Keane’s department has put together a team of consultants and is working on funding for a 12-month study on what the new ordinance should encompass. The team includes stakeholders from all points of view, including developers and advocates for tree protection…

Hays, Kansas, Daily News, June 1, 2017: Drought, insects can take toll on trees

Looks can be deceiving when it comes to the health of trees. That’s one thing Mike Mills, owner of Mills Engineering, pointed out Wednesday afternoon as he removed a large cottonwood from a property on Pine Street. Part of the tree had fallen and caused damage to the house. Years of drought and insect invasions, followed by the recent rains, weakened the tree, Mills said. “What happens is these trees are hollowed out and they’re dry. There’s no core to them,” he said, showing numerous limbs he’d cut that were hollow through and through. He likened the tree to a sponge that is allowed to dry out and hardens, then gets exposed to water again. “It starts to bend in the wind and now our hard, dry wood is wet and soft and flexible, and it breaks off and falls over,” he said…

Marin, California, Independent Journal, May 31, 2017: Mill Valley getting tough on illegal tree cutting

Mill Valley residents who cut down trees without permission could end up paying a heavy price. A change to the city’s tree ordinance, which takes effect Thursday, June 1, requires illegal tree-cutters to pay a fine of $1,000 or the value of the tree, whichever is greater. There is a heftier penalty of $5,000 — or value of the tree — for heritage trees, a special class of large redwoods, oaks and madrones protected by the city’s code. “There hasn’t been one act or instance,” nor a spike of illegal tree removals, said Kari Svanstrom, city planner. “It’s an ongoing issue that we’ve been wanting to address, and the Planning Commission has been looking at it for some time.” Since 2005, the city has treated illegal tree removal as a simple municipal code violation subject to a $100 fine for a first offense. That wasn’t enough to deter people from illegally topping large redwoods, or cutting out groups of smaller, non-heritage trees, Svanstrom said. On average, the city responds to about one complaint of illegal tree removal a month, she said…

Florence, South Carolina, WBTW-TV, May 31, 2017: Lengthy tree ordinance causes controversy in Surfside Beach

A tree ordinance is the talk of the town in Surfside Beach. At Wednesday’s town council meeting, residents and council members debated the topic for nearly an hour. “We have a pretty strict tree ordinance in effect right now,” said Surfside Beach Mayor Bob Childs. “There were some that thought maybe it was too restrictive and that’s why it came back up and that’s why council is trying to deal with it.” Mayor Childs says right now if a town resident wants to trim or cut down a tree on their own property, that community member would have to get a permit. “That’s one of the sticking issues to try to come up with something that everybody’s comfortable with,” the mayor explains. Some residents said the current ordinance is too restrictive and they support the amended ordinance, which gives people more freedom to cut and trim trees on their own property…

Danville, Virginia, Register-Bee, May 31, 2017: Aging trees become hazards in West Main Street area

Trees are coming down in Danville. The city has been getting rid of some of the older trees in the area around West Main Street because they are dying and becoming a hazard, said Danville Public Works Director Rick Drazenovich. “We have a lot of large oak trees that are now starting to reach the end of their life span,” Many of the trees were planted in the early part of the last century and are starting to develop root diseases. Some are in narrow grass strips between the curb and sidewalk — the wrong location for trees that can grow up to 90 feet tall. They don’t have good root structure, Drazenovich said…

Pocatello, Idaho, KIFI-TV, May 31, 2017: Hundreds of wrong trees need removal from Portneuf Wellness Complex

In theory, maple and pine trees would be ideal for creating a beautiful landscape across the new Portneuf Wellness Complex, which is exactly what everyone thought during the landscaping phase of the project. However, out of the numerous contractors and project managers involved in designing the facility’s landscape, nobody predicted the unexpectedly wet and windy conditions that hit eastern Idaho hard this year, which was too much for those trees to handle. Bannock County Events Director Aaron Greenwell said the county wasn’t involved in the landscaping or design aspects of the facility, however, it’s the county’s responsibility to keep it maintained. Now, the county’s responsible for footing the bill to have 180 of those dead trees replaced…

Columbia, South Carolina, The State, May 30, 2017: Family settles lawsuit after fallen tree limb kills 3-year-old son in Irmo park

The parents of a 3-year-old boy killed three years ago by a falling tree limb in an Irmo park have settled a lawsuit for $3.6 million. The settlement was reached last week, just days before the third anniversary of Jacoby Latta’s death. He was killed May 31, 2014. His parents, Stuart and Xaviera, filed a wrongful death lawsuit alleging negligence by Town Hall and six companies that designed and built Irmo Community Park, court records say. Most of the money will be paid by companies involved in creating the park and the playground where the tragedy occurred. The town of Irmo is paying $400,000, with the remainder coming from the companies in varying amounts, records show…

Greensboro, North Carolina, WGHP-TV, May 30, 2017: Greensboro woman warns of tree trimming scam

On March 7, Linda Ueland decided to get some work done in her backyard. “We wanted to go ahead and get our trees trimmed,” Ueland said. “I pulled the flyer out and made the call to this person’s number on here.” She called a man named Jim Shrewsbury who approached her in her yard a few weeks earlier, claiming to own the tree trimming service Arbor Tech Custom Tree Care. “We walked around the yard,” she said. “We wrote down a few things I wanted to have done.” Ueland got a quote for $170 dollars. She paid the full amount up front, in cash. “I was just eager to get it done,” she said. But Ueland says the workers never showed up that day…

Portland, Maine, WCSH-TV, MAY 30, 2017: Woman saves old tree for one more day, but it may be cut soon

A woman took matters into her own hands Tuesday morning when she climbed into a tree slated for removal in her South Portland neighborhood. Jamie Howard lives at 18 Coolidge Ave., just one house away from a small empty lot covered in trees, including a large one affectionately named ‘Groot’ by neighborhood boys. The name comes from a comic book movie featuring a superhero tree. “Trees make our property and our street beautiful,” Howard says. “These trees are my view. Cutting down these trees, from my point of view, is equivalent to removing…my ocean view.” Howard says after the tree got its name, she decided to get involved. She contacted Jeff Walker, the realtor who had put the lot up for sale. Howard says she has been working for a while to find out more about what her community can do to prevent the cutting down of the trees. Howard says she understands that real estate in her area is in high demand at the moment. But for non-conforming lots like the one that houses the tree in question, the city of South Portland told Howard, a hearing is required and approval from the city. There is an ordinance that puts restrictions on developing non-conforming lots

Las Vegas, Nevada, KTNV-TV, May 30, 2017: Problem of invasive olive tree could hold lessons for other neighborly disputes

They say good fences make good neighbors, except one Las Vegas valley family would have to disagree. An olive tree in the yard neighboring Jose Morales’ near Charleston and Nellis boulevards has leaned over onto his property, and it’s causing a multitude of problems. Even dealing with a language barrier, Morales wanted to show us how the tree has become a nuisance for him. Hundreds of the small fruits have fallen into his yard. Many of them are rotting too… The house and tree are owned by King Futts PFM, a property management company. Daniel Morales says every time he’s tried to contact them, he’s been given the runaround…

St. Paul, Minnesota, Pioneer Press, May 29, 2017: St. Paul says goodbye to ash tree, hello to Kentucky coffeetree?

Goodbye, ash trees. Hello, Kentucky coffeetrees. Take a look around and you’ll see that St. Paul’s treescape is changing. The city plans to remove 1,350 ash trees from boulevards this year as a result of the invasive emerald ash borer taking root, and a separate program will mean 1,800 new trees in select neighborhoods. The city has a 5-year rotating cycle that determines which neighborhoods get new boulevard trees. This year, spring planting takes place in the West Seventh, North End and Greater East Side neighborhoods. Those blocks getting new trees may see a caravan of workers putting them in. On Thursday, crews were traveling up and down a section of the North End, with one vehicle dropping off the trees, followed by a crew that dug a hole and dropped in the tree, another that moved soil and watered the tree, and one more that added mulch. “It’s like an assembly line,” said Lauren Stufft, an urban forester for St. Paul…

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, KDKA-TV, May 29, 2017: Man struck, killed by falling tree he cut down

Authorities say a western Pennsylvania man was killed when a tree he was cutting down fell on top of him. The Cambria County coroner’s office said 37-year-old Jesse Snyder was using a chain saw to cut the tree on his Susquehanna Township property shortly after noon Saturday. Coroner Jeffrey Lees said the tree began to fall but hit a nearby branch and was redirected toward Snyder, hitting him on the head. Lees said he pronounced Snyder dead at the scene due to a head injury. The death was ruled accidental…

Columbia, South Carolina, WIST-TV, May 29, 2017: A quick evening thunderstorm left an overwhelming amount of wreckage for two

A quick evening thunderstorm Sunday night left an overwhelming amount of wreckage for two Columbia homes. A tree from Patty Humble’s yard on Wallace Street in downtown Columbia is now in pieces in her front yard. Her next door neighbor’s porch is demolished and Humble’s bedroom wall has a new gaping hole. “We heard this extremely loud boom and the house shook. We ran out to the front and saw the tree and looked to the left and saw our neighbor’s entire front porch was gone.” A strong evening storm caused the tree to go down, but Humble believes the damage was done months before the tree fell…

Memphis, Tennessee, WHBQ-TV, May 29, 2017: How to find the right tree contractor after severe storms

Is the person you’re hiring to remove trees reputable? Because if not, you may lose a lot of money. Kevin Smith from Red’s Tree Service Inc. went out with his crew as they removed a tree from a house in the Sherwood Forest area. Kevin told FOX13 you must ensure the tree removal company has Workmen’s Compensation associated with it. “If they get hurt on your property and they don’t have insurance, you could be held responsible,” Smith said. Smith also told FOX13, you must have a contract in writing. “That shows the amount that they are going to charge you and what they are going to do for the services. Make sure you don’t pay any money upfront until they complete the services,” Smith said…

Las Vegas, Nevada, KNTV, May 25, 2017: Tree removal angers neighbors in Henderson community

Neighbors in a Henderson community are fighting over trees, or a lack thereof. Driving into the Charlemont Condo complex in Green Valley, you can clearly see changes are happening. There is a dumpster in the front parking lot full of yard waste and landscaping rock filling several parking spaces. Not everyone is happy about the changes. “I cried the whole time,” Teresa Prater said of watching two large trees outside her condo. This as she and other neighbors are working to stop the landscaping changes that led to more than a dozen trees being cut down…

Duluth, Minnesota, WDIO-TV, May 25, 2017: More illegal tree cutting in Cook County

There have been more reports of birch trees being cut illegally in Northern Minnesota. According to the Cook County Sheriff’s Office, a blue van was spotted with three to four men cutting down trees in the Tom Lake area in Cook County. Witnesses told authorities that approximately 25 trees had been put in a pile. The trees are typically small birch trees which are sold to craft companies. “Unfortunately, it seems there is a highly profitable market for these trees and bark,” Sheriff Pat Eliasen said in a press release. “Conservation officers are reporting an alarming rate of illegal cutting of birch trees across Minnesota and Wisconsin for use in decorating and sales to craft companies. This activity is damaging to our wilderness and wildlife, and these trees can take up to a decade or more to regenerate.” The punishment for cutting down white birch trees on public land varies, from a substantial fine to even jail time. Birch trees can be harvested from public property in Minnesota, but only with written permission or a permit…

New Scientist, May 25, 2017: Tree-climbing goats spit out and disperse valuable argan seeds

In south-western Morocco, acrobatic goats climb argan trees to eat their fruit and leaves. A tree full of goats is a striking sight, but the goats’ widely overlooked habit of regurgitating and spitting out the nuts may be important to the life of these forests. Goat herders lead their flocks through the argan (Argania spinosa) forests, where the animals can clamber up trees 8 to 10 metres high and strip them nearly bare. Popular accounts say the goats defecate the nuts of argan fruits, which can then be retrieved from the goats’ manure. Cracking these nuts open is the first step in making argan oil, a valuable export to richer countries where it is used in beauty products and foods. People may also harvest the fruits directly, but the goats save them a step. “Some scientists have accepted the defecation hypothesis, probably because they did not speak to the herders,” says Miguel Delibes, a biologist at Doñana Biological Station in Seville, Spain. The herders say the goats mostly spit the seeds out…

Indianapolis, Indiana, Star, May 25, 2017: Galls cause little or no damage to host trees

Dear Dr. Dirt: There are several oak trees growing in our lawn. As a result, there is always something falling out of the trees. In early May, it was little green balls ranging from pea size to golf balls. Any idea what is causing the balls? — Pat, Indianapolis
Dear Reader: There are many kinds of galls, which are made by insects like aphids and wasps as well as mites. Maple bladder gall, which is common on Silver maples, is noted for its tiny, red growths. Of all the trees, the oaks are the most likely to be attacked by the gall makers. There are perhaps over 100 different galls that are found on oaks, and most of them are caused by tiny wasps. They sting or injure the foliage as it is developing rapidly. Fortunately, the galls cause little or no damage to the host trees. In this particular case, the balls are probably those of the oak apple gall…

Atlanta, Georgia, Journal-Constitution, May 24, 2017: Snellville to get tough on those who cut down trees without permission

If you cut down a tree without permission in Snellville, expect to pay a heavy price in the near future. That’s the word from city officials who, following two tree-cutting sprees committed by shopping plaza owners, are in the process of adding more teeth to an already existing ordinance designed to prevent unwarranted tree removal by commercial property owners. “In spite of Snellville’s long-standing ordinances prohibiting the arbitrary removal of trees, we have recently had some violations of those ordinances,” said Councilman Dave Emanuel. “While some violators plead ignorance, I believe they were in fact subscribing to the philosophy that it’s easier to ask for forgiveness than permission. It may be easier, but it will become a lot more expensive.” Currently the fee for cutting down trees without permission is a minimum of $356 per tree per day. Under the new measure, which still awaits formal review and approval, violators would pay $995 per tree per day. Also under the proposed ordinance removal of any tree without the approval from the city’s Planning Director is prohibited…

Oakland, Michigan, Press, May 24, 2017: Strange slime on your cedar tree is a type of fungus

Q: I just looked at my evergreens that I was told are Eastern red cedars. I don’t think these trees are supposed to get flowers but right after it rained, some orange floppy flowerlike things appeared on the branches. Then, they got sort of slippery and now look like light orange octopi drooping off the branches. What is this stuff?
A: You have just met Cedar-Apple Rust which forms woody, deformed galls on eastern red cedars. In the spring, these galls sprout wonderfully slimy tentacles, called telial horns. These are essentially reproductive structures. When the slimy horns dry up, the spores float away, looking for an apple or crabapple to call home…

Syracuse, New York, WSYR-TV, May 24, 2017: More locals come forward with complaints about Holbrook’s Tree Services

Once Mark Somers and Farah Tengra shared their stories with NewsChannel 9, more complaints about Holbrook arrived on the Your Stories lines. Worried about falling limbs, Lucien LeFebvre says he gave Mark Holbrook a $1,600 deposit to cut down six trees and trim four more. “He trimmed the tree right up to the top and just let it stand there, with the rope on it,” LeFebvre explains. “So, I said, well, I don’t think he is going to come back.” LeFebvre says Holbrook did come back at one point– to ask for another $800. Then “…Never answered the phone, so I said… I’m dead. He scammed me,” LeFebvre adds. His story is no surprise to Carrie Dunn. She says Holbrook never finished a job for her after a down payment of more than $3,000…

Lake Tahoe, Nevada, News, May 24, 2017: One incredibly wet winter will not rid the West of the beetle infestation that has

One incredibly wet winter will not rid the West of the beetle infestation that has devastated forests, especially in California where more than 102 million trees have died since 2010. “Bark beetles are still there. They will hatch and fly in early summer. Then we’ll expect to see additional mortality, but at what rate is anyone’s guess,” Chris Anthony, CalFire division chief, told Lake Tahoe News. What to do with all that fuel remains an unknown. Leaving it in the forests creates a fire hazard. Removing it is a financial conundrum. Even the wood that can be harvested doesn’t necessarily then have a home. Trees that come off federal or state land cannot be sold oversees unless they have been milled to a certain dimension prior to exporting. That in itself can be cost prohibitive. According to the regional U.S. Forest Service office, lots of people in California have looked into the export issue and potential legislation, but the agency could not provide any new information. This is a federal issue. No one from Rep. Tom McClintock’s office responded to an inquiry. He is the Republican congressman representing Lake Tahoe and a large swath of the Sierra in the House…

Columbia, South Carolina, The State, May 23, 2017: Lexington County considers saving trees in new subdivisions

Lexington County leaders are looking to save more trees as new neighborhoods sprout. County Council took the first step toward that goal Tuesday in agreeing to consider requiring developers to establish a landscape buffer around the edges of new subdivisions. The plan would limit clear-cutting of tracts for homes, a practice that stirs complaints because of lost foliage in the steadily growing county. Council members didn’t settle on a buffer size, although some of the nine members said a 20-foot width seems sufficient without inconveniencing builders. Requiring buffers would preserve scenery and reduce erosion that can lead to pollution in streams and lakes, Councilwoman Erin Long Bergeson of Chapin said. Some developers voluntarily include buffers in the design of new neighborhoods. But it’s time to stop “knocking down big trees” to make it easier to build, Councilman Darrell Hudson of Lexington said…

Bloomington, Indiana, Herald Times, May 23, 2017: DNR urges homeowners not to plant ornamental pear trees

Indiana officials are urging homeowners and landscapers to stop planting ornamental pear trees because they are an invasive species that’s crowding out native trees. The state Department of Natural Resources says the trees, commonly known as Bradford pears, may be a popular landscaping tree but they’re also a nuisance that can spread. Megan Abraham is the director of the DNR’s Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology. She says that over time the different varieties of the ornamental pear trees have cross-pollinated and that’s allowed them “to rapidly spread into our natural resources…”

Oakhurst, California, Sierra Star, May 23, 2017: Governor Brown proposes $50 million cuts in battle against tree mortality

Critics of Gov. Jerry Brown’s revisions to the 2017-2018 state budget say he’s proposing to cut millions of dollars desperately needed to fight fires and fund tree mortality projects across the state. Brown’s updated budget, released last week, cuts funds for local tree mortality efforts from $52.7 million to just $2 million, critics said in a prepared release. They said that is less than 4% of similar funds allotted in January of this year. CalFire would also see a huge cut if the Governor’s budget is approved, critics said. Funding for the extended fire season, increased firefighter surge capacity, Conservation Corps fire suppression crews, and aerial assets is set to be slashed by nearly half – from $91 million to $41.7 million. “The drought may be officially over, but the tree mortality crisis is not,” said Jim Patterson, Assemblyman (R-23rd). “Trees are still dying and the need to fund local efforts is greater than ever. Now is not the time to slash and burn these vital programs…”

Los Alamos, New Mexico, Daily Post, May 23, 2017: What happens when a tree falls?

As I am writing this column and watching the snow fly in mid-May, I’m willing to bet my phone is going to ring and someone is going to tell me their big, beautiful tree just came crashing down. Snow is heavy this time of year. So how will your insurance respond? Let’s take a look. 1. Your homeowners insurance likely covers tree removal and damage repairs for your home and other insured structures, such as fences. A tree falls on your property and damages one or more insured structures. What now? Your homeowners insurance will likely help with the cost of removing the tree and repairing the damage. That’s once you pay your deductible, of course. Examples of covered incidents can include strong winds knocking a tree over onto your roof or lightning striking a tree, causing it to fall on your fence. Keep in mind there is little to any coverage for the tree itself. However, if a tree falls due to neglect, you may not receive any coverage. So keep your trees in good shape, and ask your neighbors to do the same…

Sonora, California, KVML Radio, May 22, 2017: Butte Fire hazard tree removal crews working through holiday weekend

Those traveling through the Butte Fire burn scar should continue being cautious as burnt hazard tree removal continues – including over much of the Memorial Day three-day weekend holiday. According to Calaveras County government spokesperson Sharon Torrence, crews continue toiling along the public rights-of-way and private properties. She notes that currently there are well over 8,200 trees on the ground. “The location and complexity of the remaining trees makes the job of taking them down more difficult and time consuming,” Torrence emphasizes. “Hauling crews have removed 51 percent of debris and logs left by the cutting crews — and that material was taken to Wallace to be chipped, then transported to Chinese Camp to a Biomass waste-to-energy plant…”

Castle Dale, Utah, Emery County Progress, May 22, 2017: Ask an Expert: Three tips for tree planting

Trees are an integral part of landscaping, and it’s important to know the basics of starting them out right so they will flourish for many years to come. Here are answers to three frequently asked questions about tree planting… Trees are best planted when they are still dormant with tight, unopened buds in the early to mid-spring after the soil has thawed. Cool temperatures and good soil moisture in the spring help trees get established. Fall planting also works well for many species, though watering is critical if the fall is dry. Summer planting of balled-and-burlapped and container plants can be successful, though hot temperatures, dry conditions and non-dormant trees make good care especially important and survival less sure. Bare-root trees should only be planted in spring while still dormant…

LaCrosse, Wisconsin, WKBT-TV, May 22, 2017: Falling tree accident leaves woman in critical condition

Officials in an eastern Minnesota city are working with businesses and property owners to remove trees in danger of falling after a woman was critically injured when a tree fell onto a restaurant’s patio this month. KARE-TV reports that Micki Scott was injured when a large tree fell onto her while she was at Punch Pizza in Wayzata on May 6. Her husband says she’s been in intensive care for two weeks. City officials brought in an arborist to examine the forest area near the restaurant. City Manager Jeffrey Dahl says the arborist reported that the tree appeared to be diseased. The city has removed additional trees that posed as a threat. Dahl says the city has submitted a claim with its insurance company and they’re reviewing the information…

Savannah, Georgia, WSAV-TV, May 22, 2017: Trees cause visibility issues with traffic lights

The tree canopy in the Hostess City is a trade mark of character, ambiance, and charm of Savannah. But the natural beauty and shade of the tree comes at a cost as the live oaks limbs, draped with Spanish Moss, can grow to block motorists view of traffic signals. There’s an example of this particular problem on the western side of the intersection of Bee Road and Victory Drive. Michelle Gavin, Public Information Officer for Savannah, says it’s a problem people should report as soon as possible. “If a citizen notices that a tree is hanging low or the Spanish Moss is hanging down obscuring a traffic light, they need to immediately call 311.” said Gavin. She says when the public shares information about trees posing public safety hazards, those reports are bumped up to the top of the list of problems the city needs to fix. “That’s a priority one call for our Park & Tree Department, to go out, observe the area, and if it does in fact need to be trimmed, they will get on that right away, within 48 hours.” Gavin said…

Miami, Florida, Herald. May 21, 2017: Nebraska farmers plant trees to protect their property

Spring planting season involves more than corn and soybeans for some Nebraska farmers. It’s also a time to plant trees and shrubs as windbreaks that protect farmsteads, fields and livestock facilities, and add native grasses to create wildlife habitat on corners of pivot-irrigated cropland. “We need to keep these trees growing, keep conservation projects going,” farmer Marshall Paulsen said during a driving tour of projects he’s undertaken the past 21 years on his farm southeast of Minden. They include re-purposing pivot corners in 1996, 2002 and 2007 in cooperation with the Holdrege-based Tri-Basin Natural Resources District and Pheasants Forever, and planting windbreaks in 2005 and 2015…

Atlanta, Georgia, Journal-Constitution, May 21, 2017: High school student struck by tree while camping dies

A Harrison High School student who was injured when a tree fell on her Friday during a camping trip in Bartow County was pronounced dead midday Sunday. Joelle Dalgleish, 16, was hurt when the tree holding the hammock in which she was sleeping snapped and fell on her around 11:30 p.m. at Red Top Mountain State Park. “Joelle was one of the sweetest and happiest people you will ever meet,” said Harrison track coach Kent Simmons, for whom Dalgleish had run track since she was a freshman in 2015. “She laughed easily and loved cracking a joke. Everyone loved her spirit and the way she could make you immediately feel comfortable around her…

Kokomo, Indiana, Perspective, May 21, 2017: How to plant a tree for successful growth

More sunlight and warm temperatures inspire homeowners to spend more time in the outdoors. Outdoor projects often top homeowners’ to-do lists in spring and summer, with gardens and landscapes taking center stage. Planting more trees around the yard is one project that can improve property value and benefit the environment… Visit a garden center or nursery and select a tree that will be hardy in your planting zone. Choosing native trees can increase the likelihood that the new tree will adapt to its surroundings. Also, inspect trees to determine if they’re healthy before taking them home. Look for evidence of root girdling, which occurs when the roots circle around the perimeter of the container and surround the trunk. Trees should not have any dead or dormant branches…

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, KELO-TV, May 21, 2017: Man gets probation for stealing trees from Chippewa Forest

A 70-year-old man has been sentenced to three years of probation for stealing thousands of tree tops from black spruce in the Chippewa National Forest. Joseph Leon Edminster was also ordered to pay $24,199 in restitution to the U.S. Forest Service and complete 200 hours of community service. He was sentenced in federal court Friday. Edminster pleaded guilty to one count of government theft in January. Assistant U.S. Attorney Laura Provinzino says Edminster’s punishment would have been more severe had he not taken responsibility for his actions. Prosecutors say Edminster admitted to cutting more than 2,700 tree tops from October 2008 to October 2014. He sold the tree tops to wholesalers for use as Christmas decorations…

Sacramento, California, Bee, May 18, 2017: Alleged tree cutting binge lands Chico fraternity in trouble with feds

A Chico State University fraternity faces federal criminal charges that its members cut 32 trees in a Lassen National Forest campground during an initiation ceremony for new pledges. A complaint filed Tuesday in the Redding office of U.S. District Court charges Pi Kappa Alpha, Chico State chapter, and its president, Evan Jossey, with 32 violations of cutting or damaging federal timber, illegal possession of a firearm and conspiracy. The charges stem from a fraternity event over the April 21 weekend at an informal U.S. Forest Service campsite on Deer Creek near Butte Meadows. About 80 people were gathered in what the federal investigating officer called a fraternity initiation ceremony. John Elam, who had been camping nearby, reported to Tehama County sheriff’s officials that he saw and heard trees being cut down and people shooting firearms. He had previously met Jossey, who introduced himself and said the fraternity would be holding “the final states of initiation” over the weekend. Elam’s April 28 report to the Tehama County Sheriff’s Office noted “large volumes of litter” as well as felled trees. In an interview with a Tehama County sheriff’s deputy, Jossey acknowledged the fraternity retreat but “denied cutting down trees or shooting any firearms or seeing any members cut down any trees or shoot firearms,” according to an affidavit filed by the Forest Service investigator…

Goshen, Indiana, News, May 18, 2017: Nappanee’s tree nursery in the ground

An idea that had taken root in the mind of current tree board president Donny Aleo’s mind a couple of years ago has finally come to fruition with the establishment of Nappanee’s first tree nursery. Seventy-seven saplings have been planted in root balls on McCormick Creek Golf Course near the 10th green behind the old clubhouse. Aleo presented the idea a couple of years ago when he was still park superintendent and a suggestion was made to turn the former Fred’s Flowers property into a temporary nursery. The city acquired that property via the redevelopment commission. Although Aleo appreciated the offer, he preferred to have the trees on park land where it wouldn’t have to be moved. “We thought it’d be more efficient to have it on park land, close to resources and also help to green up the golf course,” Aleo said…

San Francisco, California, Hoodline, May 18, 2017: As tree maintenance reverts back to the City, here’s what to expect

When Proposition E passed last November with nearly 80 percent of voter approval, care of San Francisco’s approximately 125,000 street trees reverted back to the city, starting July 1st. Currently, San Francisco manages 40,000 of those trees, while the rest were maintained by property owners. Now, San Francisco Public Works is looking at the implementation of the $19 million tree maintenance initiative. According to Public Works director Mohammed Nuru at a May 16th community meeting held at Richmond Station, the agency will need three years to ramp up their staff. The agency is already in the process of hiring contractors to augment existing crews for the larger workload that will begin in July…

Nature, May 18, 2017: Trees in eastern US head west as climate changes

Ecologists have long predicted that climate change will send plants and animals uphill and towards the poles in search of familiar temperatures. Such movements have increasingly been documented around the world. But a study now shows that changing rainfall patterns may be driving some tree species in the eastern United States west, not north. Songlin Fei, a forest ecologist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, and his colleagues tracked the shifting distributions of 86 types of trees using data collected by the US Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis Program during two periods: from 1980 to 1995 and between 2013 and 2015 for all states. They found more species heading west than north, probably partly because of changing precipitation patterns, the team reported on 17 May in Science Advances1. “That was a huge surprise for us,” says Fei. This study suggests that, in the near-term, trees are responding to changes in water availability more than to temperature changes, he says…

Total Landscape care, May 16, 2017: Methods for remediating tree and sidewalk conflicts

A majority of people have probably tripped over a buckled sidewalk at least once in their life and often the culprits are industrious tree roots that have set out to invade new territory as they search for nutrients. The number one way to prevent trees from warping sidewalks and driveways is to follow the wise practice of planting the right tree for the right place. According to the Georgia Forestry Commission, tree root systems extend about one to one-and-a-half feet out from the trunk for every inch of trunk diameter measured about four feet above the ground. This means that a 12-inch diameter tree will have roots spreading 12 to 15 feet out in every direction. Roots grow in search of water and one good way to keep roots out of the way is to encourage deep growth by watering longer and less frequently, soaking several feet of soil instead of just the surface. If sidewalk replacement or other work will be regular and root cutting is expected, the Arbor Day Foundation says that Norway maple, ginkgo, hackberry, hawthorns, cherries and river birch are more tolerant of root damage. Also, the City of Portland has a list of trees that are suitable for streets based on their height and presence of power lines…

London, UK, BBC, May 16, 2017: Cities need ‘hedges rather than trees’ for environment

Hedges are often better than trees at soaking up air pollution among tall buildings, research has suggested. A paper in the journal Atmospheric Environment says tall trees are good at absorbing pollution in more open areas. But hedges can trap toxins at exhaust pipe level, so reduce people’s direct exposure to harmful pollutants. Lead author Prof Prashant Kumar said councils should try to plant low hedges between pedestrians and the street if pavements are wide enough…

Jackson, Michigan, Citizen-Patriot, May 16, 2017: ‘It could have all been prevented,’ resident says after city tree smashes car, house

Bambi McCabe wouldn’t sleep in the corner bedroom of her home during storms. She knew the large tree in the city right-of-way in front of the house was coming down any day. It did around midnight Tuesday, May 16. The tree totaled McCabe’s 2000 Mazda Miata, destroyed her garage and damaged her 1920’s-built home and patio on Washington Avenue at Bowen Street. While she was in the bedroom near the tree, nobody was injured. “The dog woke me up, I heard a crack and it came for the house and the windows,” McCabe said. “I jumped over the bed and got the hay out of there.” McCabe said she had alerted the city numerous times about the tree. A large section fell in the other direction during the March windstorm, causing a gas leak across the street, sparking power outages and scattering debris…

Geneva, New York, Finger Lakes Times, May 16, 2017, Tree pest quarantine expanded to 43 counties

The emerald ash borer quarantine has expanded to 43 counties, including Ontario, Seneca, Wayne and Yates. Last year, the quarantine zone only included the town of Canandaigua and seven other restricted zones outside the Finger Lakes. The state Department of Environmental Conservation and state Department of Agriculture & Markets said the eight existing merged ash borer restricted zones have been expanded and merged into a single restricted zone of all or part of 43 counties. The emerald ash borer is a serious invasive tree pest in the United States, killing hundred of millions of ash trees in forests, yards and neighborhoods.The beetles’ larvae feed on the cambium layer just below the bark of the ash tree, affecting the transport of water and nutrients into the crown and killing the tree…

Minneapolis, Minnesota, KARE-TV, May 15, 2017: Teens suspected of cutting Faribault memorial tree

For eight years, overlooking the beautiful Faribault soccer complex was an 8 year old Red Maple. It was a tree that brought some comfort to Don Paulson and many others who loved his son Nicolas, nicknamed Ginger. “And I almost think some kids didn’t know his name was Nicolas. They just thought his name was Ginger,” Paulson fondly remembers. Nicholas Paulson, eight years ago, died by suicide at age 16. “Completely off guard. Never seen it coming,” Don Paulson said. The tree was planted as a memorial, with a remembrance plaque placed below. And it stood until earlier this month, when a group of vandals chopped it down. “Kind of a disturbing act of vandalism,” said Faribault Police Chief Andy Bohlen. Bohlen said the vandals sawed or chopped down at least 5 different trees on city or school property. The value tops $5000, according to Bohlen, likely making the crime a felony…

Goshen, Indiana, News, May 15, 2017: The poem is true, ‘Only God can make a tree’

This has long been a favorite poem of mine. Each spring it resonates once again when I witness all the new growth of green vegetation in our trees. Spring is an awakening for all plants and trees that I yearn for. It starts early when buds start to form on trees and peeks of green, yellow, pink and red make their first appearance setting the trees aglow. Following this, a chain reaction starts with tiny shoots bursting into miniature tender leaves that will eventually mature into full-blown leaves. I first started taking notice of this transformation when I was 16-year-old youngster. Our yearly trips to the woods of northern Michigan on our quest for mushrooms took us deep into the state forests. On the first of several trips, the trees were devoid of vegetation and the forest floor was just awakening with patches of wild onions. A week later, it had progressed into minor leaf activity that provided a moderate amount of shade and the forest floor was starting to turn green plant life. A third trip was often, but not always, skipped because the leaf canopy made it dark enough that unless you had bright sunshine, it was nearly impossible to see and the forest floor became alive with plant life of all kinds…

Vermont Public Radio, April 25, 2017: Mimicking Mother Nature, UVM scientists ‘nudge’ forests toward old growth conditions

In the northeast U.S., there is less than 1 percent of old growth forest left. A new University of Vermont study finds that harvesting trees in a way that mimics old growth forests not only restores critical habitat, but also stores a surprising amount of carbon. For a forest to be considered “old growth,” it must grow largely undisturbed, usually for several centuries. These ancient forests help foster biodiversity of plants, animal and even fungi — and can help mitigate flooding. But UVM forest ecologist Bill Keeton wanted to see if he could take a “middle-aged” New England forest and “nudge” the forest ecosystem into old growth conditions…

Holmes Beach, Florida, Islander, May 15, 2017: Holmes Beach commissioners look into adding tree protections

A city recognized by Tree City USA should do better. Commissioner Carol Soustek wants the city to find ways to protect trees. A short supply of shade in Holmes Beach prompted Soustek to bring up discussion of tree protection regulations May 9. “Our city is kind of trying to be the Tree City of the USA but we’re not protecting anything here,” Soustek said. Construction of a single-family home in Holmes Beach does not include permitting for tree removal. “They don’t have to apply for any kind of landscaping permits to knock down these trees,” Soustek said…

Hackensack, New Jersey, Record, May 14, 2017: Falling tree kills Passaic man during Mother’s Day BBQ

A man was killed and six others were injured after lightning struck a tree and a limb fell into a backyard during a Mother’s Day barbecue on Paulison Avenue. Lightning hit the tree at 4:58 p.m., causing a tree limb to fall in the backyard of 375 Paulison Ave., where a family was having a barbecue, Lt. Jonathan Schaer said. “It’s an act of God, as unfortunate as it is,” Schaer said. The event was a family barbecue celebrating a birthday and Mother’s Day. The 28-year-old man died from his injures. Schaer said his name was being withheld pending family notification…

Brunswick, Georgia, Golden Isles News, May 14, 2017: Tree ordinance goes back to drawing board

The committee assembled to create a new tree ordinance, which would only apply to St. Simons Island, will be meeting on Tuesday to resume the task after the Glynn County Commission decided not to adopt the ordinance at a meeting on May 5. It took the committee roughly two years to create the ordinance that was being considered, hearing from developers and arborists along the way, among others. Multiple town halls and commission meetings were held to get input from the public and county officials during that time. Despite that, the Islands Planning Commission saw fit to recommend that the proposed amendment be sent back to the drawing board, and that the committee be expanded to include a wider range of county residents. The county commission agreed with the IPC’s recommendation, making the final decision to have the ordinance sent back to the committee for tweaking and refinement…

Indianapolis, Indiana, Star, May 14, 2017: Why Ball State chopped down ‘gum tree’

For more than a decade, Ball State University students have been sticking their used gum to a small tree in the middle of campus. To some it was art. To others it was disgusting. Either way, the quirky and even beloved tradition stuck.That is, until this weekend when the university apparently chopped it down. Students discovered a stump where the full gum tree once stood, near Bracken Library on the west side of the Emens Auditorium parking garage…

Norwalk, Ohio Refletor, May 13, 2017: Woodlot tactics that work

I love woodlots. I hunt in them, enjoy wildlife in them, gather wild foods like walnuts and hickory nuts in them, and sometimes just walk around and let stress ooze out of my feet into rich woodland soil. Huron County and surrounding territory has lots of woodlots, and I’ve enjoyed some more than others. Some have been ruthlessly gutted of all usable timber leaving only treetops and brush, and some have majestic trees and lots of wild game that returns year after year. If you own a woodlot, have relatives who own one, or friends that let you roam in their acres, you can improve almost any woodlot with minimum effort – if the landowner doesn’t mind or you have time to work on your own acres. One of the first things you might do is remove all “weed trees” and make them into nice little brushpiles that rabbits and small animals can use for protection. Weed trees like hackberry, slippery elm, witch hazel, and others of that ilk are not worth having for firewood, wildlife food, or any other purpose. They simply take up sunlight that other trees need, and pull nutrients from the soil to no good purpose. But do leave the beech since their trunks hollow readily for wild creatures homes, and the beechnuts are used by everything from raccoons and squirrels to deer and wild turkeys…

Norman, Oklahoma, Transcript, May 11, 2017: Tree ya later: east side residents shocked by new wave of clear cuts

When a tree falls in the woods, it makes a sound, but it’s nothing compared to the noise that’s raised when a tree gets cut down in Norman. As Norman is a tree city — a designation granted by the Arbor Foundation — it may not be surprising that many Norman residents feel strongly about protecting them. But some east-side residents were surprised when contractors hired by Western Farmers Electric Cooperative showed up in the Royal Oaks neighborhood this week and started lopping of limbs and grinding stumps. “They said we should’ve known where the easement was when we bought this house. They said we should have known that this would happen,” Resident Terrence Shaw said. “Why would I look at a 20-year-old tree and think it’s going to get cut down someday? These aren’t new trees. It’s not like we just planted them.” Shaw said the most frustrating part was the lack of communication. He said he attempted to contact Western Farmers Electric Cooperative many times but ran into voicemail inboxes and a phone portal that led nowhere…

Des Moines, Iowa, KCCI-TV, May 11, 2017: Thousands of ash trees without issues to be cut down

Thousands of ash trees all across the city are being cut down. The reason: the emerald ash borer. The city hopes the project will improve the quality of trees here in the future — But most of the trees don’t actually have any issues. It’s all as a preventative measure. Out of the nearly 3,000 trees cut down, only one has been found to have the emerald ash borer. Seven-thousand trees in total will be removed and some Des Moines residents are not happy to see them go…

Atlanta, Georgia, WGCL-TV, May 11, 2017: Man gets stuck 40 ft. high trying to trim tree

A man had to be airlifted to the hospital after getting stuck in a tree he was trying to trim in Carroll County. A spokesperson with Carroll County Fire Rescue said crews responded to Oakwood Mobile Home Park just after 10:30 a.m. Thursday after being told a man was pinned 40 feet high in the tree. Officials say the 45-year-old man was trying to trim the tree with a chain saw when a section of the tree fell on him, wedging his arm into a fork in the tree. Several agencies were called to help rescue the man, who was eventually brought down just before noon…

Women’s Health, May 1, 2017: Staking a Young Tree

When a tree is in the young stages, one of the most vital things you need to provide for it in addition to water and nutrients is support. If you don’t hold up the tree somehow, it might end up bending in a certain direction and growing extremely crooked for the rest of its life. So no matter what, you should always have some kind of support. The most popular method of keeping young trees upright is to put long stakes into the ground on either side, and tie loops around the tree. Each loop should be fairly loose to allow for further expanding of the trunk. Lots of people just have a stake on one side of the tree, but this is not a good practice because it generally doesn’t allow for further growth of the tree. You should only be staking your tree if you think that wind and other forces might be literally moving the ball of roots within the ground. Your staking should prevent all of this movement, because this is the most harmful thing that can happen to a young tree. It causes the roots to be in motion too much and not be able to properly get a hold on the soil so that the tree can develop normally. Before you stake a tree, you should be completely sure that it needs it. If you constrict the movement and growth of a tree that doesn’t need to be tethered down, you could harm it beyond repair. For example, the staking mechanism you use could cause abrasion or “rashes” on the trunk. This will happen anyways, but why have it happen needlessly, Also, staking gives your yard an unnatural look and can present a hazard for people walking or running across the yard…

The Weekender, May 10, 2017, 47-year-old apple tree still bearing plenty of fruit in Pringle

The apple tree in Dennis Kachmarsky’s yard on Pringle Hill was planted by him 47 years ago and judging by the number of blossoms and buds, it will once again produce hundreds of Empire apples. The dwarf tree is old by apple tree standards, as evidenced by the many wooden stakes needed to prop up the branches to keep them from the ground. The center of the tree looks like it was cracked open by a lightning bolt. Large gaping holes can be seen in the main branches. Yet the tree remains productive. The tree is — pardon the pun — the apple of Kachmarsky’s eye. And just like the tree, Kachmarsky, who will turn 89 in August, uses a wooden stick to help him navigate around and under the apple tree. He was wearing a T-shirt that read, “Pringle Hill, PA,” under his flannel shirt. “We won’t have any apples until October,” Kachmarsky said. “And we have to watch that the deer don’t get to them like they did last year…”

Farmington, Maine, Daily Bulldog, May 10, 2017: Broadway pine tree coming down

The Board of Selectmen voted unanimously to have an old white pine tree on Broadway taken down Tuesday evening, after reviewing a report that indicated its extensive internal damage could put surrounding property and people at risk. According to the report, the tree was likely struck by lightning years ago, leaving a long, jagged exit wound. That internal damage was not fully contained by solid wood, the arborist’s report indicated, resulting in decay in the trunk. As the tree’s canopy was above the weakened, hollowing section, the report concluded, the tree was at risk of simply snapping in half in a windstorm. The Board of Selectman last seriously considered cutting down the tree in 1996, after a large limb fell during a winter storm, damaging private property. The tree was also slated for destruction in 1990, as part of a sidewalk project, but was spared thanks to the actions of the “Pine Tree Six;” local middle school students that famously stood in a circle around the trunk. This most recent damage was discovered last year, after an arborist was hired to limb up the pine…

Birmingham, Alabama, WIAT-TV, May 10, 2017: Alabama Forestry Commission takes to the air to monitor tree-killing beetles

The Alabama Forestry Commission is keeping a close eye on a beetle that can cause serious damage to trees. On Wednesday morning, CBS42 news reporter Matt Fernandez went up in the air with AFC pilot Phillip Montgomery and Warrior Work Unit manager Brad Lang looking for damage caused by the Southern Pine Beetle. The team was on the lookout for signs of damage done by southern pine beetles, which are smaller than a grain of rice. Lang said that once a tree becomes stressed by things like wildfires or the drought, these Beetles will attack and kill the trees. The WWU manager told CBS42 that you could tell the tree was damaged if the tree top is turning yellow, brown, yellow or lime greenish. Pine Beetles can do some serious damage…

Public CEO, May 10, 2017: This Winter Has Not Erased Sierra Tree Deaths

Tree mortality has not gone away with the wet winter we’ve had and neither have the dangers it presents for many California counties. We still have millions of dead trees and some of them still pose direct hazards to homes and infrastructure. The potential for a wildfire in those stands of dead trees is enough to keep me awake at night. California has many issues to deal with, but this one should stay near the top of the list. Please keep reading to find more about what’s happening in my home county of Amador, and also to hear from Mariposa County Supervisor Kevin Cann, Tulare County Supervisor Steve Worthley, and Tuolumne County Supervisor Randy Hanvelt. Amador County is fortunate to have important lessons learned from other counties that had significant tree mortality years before the issue really hit our county. We hired a County Coordinator and a Registered Professional Forester to administer projects. Following dead and dying tree removal by PG&E, the county selected a firm to perform tree removal in county rights-of-way. We have four initial projects that are either in planning phases or with actual tree removal in process…

Seattle, Washington, KOMO-TV, May 9, 2017: Tree slices through home but family thankful for what didn’t happen

A Thurston County family is thankful their little boy didn’t get crushed by a tree that sliced their home in half. It happened in Tenino during the monster storm last Thursday. By the size of it you can tell the tree could have been deadly as it fell into Karen Nelson’s home. As she stood in her demolished living room she said, “I’m very blessed. That we are very blessed that we weren’t trapped in the bedroom or we weren’t crushed downstairs.” It was from the series of thunder storms that roared through Olympia and Lacey late Thursday afternoon bringing a light show and a windstorm that knocked down hundreds of trees…

Total landscape and Lawncare, May 9, 2017: Michigan tree company ordered to cease operations again

The Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs has ordered Sunset Tree Service & Landscaping in Bay County to suspend its business activities once more.Twelve citations were issued, totaling $222,000 in penalties, and the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MIOSHA) director Shelly Edgerton announced that the company was served a Cease Operations Order because of the hazards present on the job site. According to MLive Michigan, there were six total violations reported, such as having no cover on the access panel for the Bandit Chipper; employees not being trained on tree trimming operations and safeguards; inadequate guard/distance for feeding rolls on the Bandit Chipper; not utilizing control devices while employees were working in and close to the road; having operator safety bars tied back with rope and wire, which keeps the device on the Bandit Chipper from being effective; and having an unguarded shaft with hex flange projections on the Bandit Chipper…

Smithsonian Institution, May 9, 2017: Surprising tree emissions show forests consume less methane than thought

Rainbow-colored tubes snake through the undergrowth. White acrylic chambers sit mounted to tree trunks like giant bleached snails. At first glance, it’s not quite clear what the heck is going on. Cryptic as it may seem, these tubes and chambers are the key to a recent study showing that trees in upland forests are capable of emitting the planet-warming greenhouse gas, methane. Scientists have long considered upland forests to be methane sinks due to the presence of methane-hungry microbes called methanotrophs in their soils. But new research by Pat Megonigal, an ecosystem ecologist who heads up the Biogeochemistry Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC),and Scott Pitz, a graduate student from Johns Hopkins, has shown that when it comes to upland forest methane cycling, soil isn’t the only game in town. Trees and their emissions are part of the equation too. In a recently published study in New Phytologist, Megonigal and Pitz found that trees in upland forests are actually capable of emitting methane through their trunks. This means that some of the methane absorbed by methanotrophs in the forest soils may be offset by tree emissions…

Gardening Know How, May 9, 2017: Propagating Windmill Palms: How to propagate a Windmill Palm Tree

Few plants are as stately and impressive as windmill palms. These remarkably adaptable plants can be grown from seed with just a few tips. Of course, propagating windmill palms requires the plant to flower and produce healthy seed. You can encourage the plant to produce seeds with proper care and feeding. The following article can help you learn how to propagate a windmill palm tree from its own seed with tricks even a novice gardener can learn. You may also find success growing palm trees from cuttings. Every palm tree is different and their propagation methods and chances of success outside their native range will vary as well. Windmill palm propagation requires a male and a female plant to produce viable seeds. Short of lifting the plant’s skirts, it can be difficult to identify the plant’s gender without a professional. However, once blooming commences, the problem becomes more clear. Males develop huge yellow sweeping flower clusters that do not fruit and females have smaller greenish blooms that will develop into fruit…

New York City, Wall Street Journal, May 8, 2017: Tree therapy? ‘Forest bathers’ say it helps

On a trek through a snowy western mountain range, a forest guide points to a grove of evergreen Japanese red cedar trees, and hikers gather around to take deep breaths. They call themselves forest bathers, part of a growing movement that believes immersing oneself in nature and in the chemicals plants and trees emit has unexpected medical benefits. The trip is part of their orientation as new employees of a maker of power devices…

Richmond, Virginia, Times-Dispatch, May 8, 2017: Woman dies after being hit by tree limb in Henrico on Friday

A woman was killed in Henrico County on Friday night when a falling tree limb hit her as she was getting out of her car, police said Sunday. The limb also smashed into the roof of her vehicle in the 300 block of Confederate Run Court in eastern Henrico. She was taken to VCU Medical Center about 9 p.m. after emergency responders performed CPR. She was pronounced dead after arriving at the hospital…

Fresno, California, KSEE-TV, May 8, 2017: Lemoore to tear out 70 trees causing infrastructure problems

Trees have become a concern along a popular street in a South Valley Neighborhood. The roots are causing major damage along Fox Street in Lemoore. City officials said at least 70 trees must go but not everyone is on board with that plan. “It’s a beautiful area, we appreciate the shade,” Tony Cervantes, a Lemoore resident, said. Cervantes has lived in Lemoore for years but he’s new to the neighborhood. He said his family loves taking walks down the scenic Fox Street. But the trees he appreciates, will soon be gone. “There’s sidewalk issues a little bit, I mean they are lifted up a little bit but I mean there’s ways around it, you can dig out the roots and recement it,” Cervantes said. “This area here you can see it’s been repaired once, it’s been grounded down and (it’s) lifting again for someone to trip on,” Nathan Olson, public works director for the City of Lemoore, said. Olson said doing what Cervantes suggest, is not that easy…

Science Daily, May 8, 2017: The evolutionary story of the birch tree, told through 80 genomes

Forests of silver birch stretch across Europe, and they are a wonder to behold: stands of slender, white-barked trees sheltering vast swathes of earth. But these woodlands also have value beyond their beauty: They are an economic asset, generating raw material for papermaking, construction, furniture-building and more. A new study illuminates the evolutionary history of birch, a tree that has not been studied much by scientists despite its commercial value. “Birch is one of the major trees for forest products in the Northern Hemisphere. Others, like spruce, pine and poplar, all have genome sequences, but birch did not — until now,” says University at Buffalo biologist Victor Albert, who co-led the Finnish-funded project…

Atlanta, Georgia, WAGA-TV, May 7, 2017: Tree falls on Norcross apartment building

Several people have been displaced after a tree fell on an apartment building in Norcross, according to the Gwinnett Fire Department. Firefighters responded around 4pm to a tree down in the 3200 block of Windscape Village Lane. Crews found a large tree that had fallen over the roof on the left-side of an 8-unit apartment building. The tree damaged part of the truss roof system and punctured the sheetrock in two top floor apartments. There were no injuries reported, according to officials…

New Canaan, Connecticut, New Canaanite, May 7, 2017: Tree warden to plant three sycamores along cherry street

The town official who oversees trees along New Canaan’s public roads is planning to improve the grass verge that runs along Cherry Street as it approaches Main with three sycamores. Behind what’s known as the Telephone Building—on the north side of Cherry Street before the curve at Club Sandwich—the grass strip had trees in the past but they’ve been cut down “for various reasons,” according to Tree Warden Bob Horan. “This is a good, open spot where we want to have tree-lined streets in the center of town,” said Horan, a Connecticut licensed arborist since 1981 who also is president of Pauley Tree & Lawn Care…

Unofficial Networks, May 7, 2017: Arborists catapult friend using downed tree…

There’s plenty of people in our audience that work in the defensible space industry or forestry in general to pad the piggy bank for a winter spent with optimal hill time. Share this around if you know anyone handy with a chainsaw that might get a chuckle…

Garden City, Kansas, KSNW-TV, May 7, 2017: Storm tree cleanup proceedings announced in Garden City

The city of Garden City announced through their website that the Public Works Department will be conducting the Storm Tree Cleanup beginning May 9. Because of the large amount of damage, city crews are unable to give a definite schedule at this time. To accommodate the needs of residents, as well as the city collection crews, the city has been divided into eight collection areas to be serviced throughout the cleanup

Birmingham, Alabama, WRGB-TV, May 4, 2017: Tree on your ride: Will insurance cover the cost?

After a long dry spell across the Tennessee Valley, heavy spring rains and strong winds have kept tree services and insurance companies busy. More rain on Thursday didn’t keep Blewett Tree Service from finishing a job in north Chattanooga. Trees blocked a portion of Minnekahda Place after a recent storm blew them down. Owner Dustin Blewett says he and his crew are thankful for the extra business even though they are working a lot of overtime. “We’re just trying to deal with everybody we can. It’s been long days without a day off,” says Blewett. They’ve been helping customers who have trees in their yards and on their homes. If a tree falls onto your home, state farm agent Kerry Smith says your homeowner’s policy will likely cover the damages…

Youngstown, Ohio, WFMJ-TV, May 4, 2017: Eliminate potential tree hazards

Three or four days after storms rolled through the valley tree service companies are still busy Thursday cleaning up the mess left behind. Arborists say leaves make trees a little heavier so high winds can help blow them down. But is there anything you can do about it? Pruning your trees can make a difference. “A tree can grow right next to a house and it will be fine you just have to make sure it’s not damaged or diseased and it’s safe to be there,” said Daniel Yoho from Davey Tree Care. Taking weight off the top of the tree and pruning can allow wind to pass through rather than creating a giant sail. That’s usually the big problem with pine trees as well…

Encinitas, California, The Coast News, May 4, 2017: Tree ordinance receives Council OK

After years of discussion and re-writes, the Encinitas City Council has approved a set of regulations aimed at protecting Encinitas’ publicly planted trees and other venerable trees. The City Council unanimously adopted the first reading of the new municipal tree ordinance on April 26, but the swift approval belies the yearlong journey it took for the council to arrive to this point. A council subcommittee comprised of former Councilwoman Lisa Shaffer and current Deputy Mayor Tony Kranz crafted the new regulations for more than a year and introduced them in November 2016, just before Shaffer stepped down from the council. Since then, the council has tabled approval of the ordinance at least four times over various concerns from residents and council members. The municipal tree ordinance gives added protection to so-called “heritage trees” — trees that have certain historical or cultural significance or are the oldest or largest of its species. Under the new regulations, those trees can only be removed with the approval of the planning commission. It also requires that the city arborist, a position for which the city is currently recruiting, OK the removal of any trees planted on public right of way…

Chicago, Illinois, DNAInfo, May 4, 2017: Want to plant your own tree on the Parkway? Get ready to battle red tape.

With the city way behind on answering requests to plant trees in parkways, frustrated residents could just go ahead and plant the trees themselves to avoid all the hassles, right? Think again. While residents can simply call 311 and ask for free trees to be planted on public property like parkways (the space between the sidewalk and the curb), it can take years for those requests to be filled. That leaves many homeowners and property managers asking in the meantime: “Can’t I just do it myself?” Yes, would be the technical answer, but, like most matters in the city, it requires a permit. The $20 permits, which are ultimately waived because there is no mechanism through which the money is collected, are issued through the Department of Streets and Sanitation’s Bureau of Forestry…

Boredom Therapy, May 3, 2017: They built a fence around this tree decades ago, and touching it will land you in a world of trouble

When Europeans first immigrated to the New World, they faced an uncertain future in an untamed land. Things could go sour at the drop of a hat if they weren’t careful. To help immigrants as they arrived in Massachusetts, English Puritan John Endicott set out to make the terrain as inviting as possible. While no one could’ve expected such a gesture, it’s what he did next that would continue on as a legacy for hundreds of years… The pear tree survived numerous snowstorms and severe hurricanes, but in 1964, it was struck by a human catastrophe. Vandals attacked the tree overnight, leaving nothing but a jagged stump, but that wasn’t the end of the story…

Newark, New Jersey, Star-Ledger, May 3, 2017: Turnpike Authority can’t be sued after tree fell, killed 2 in car, court rules

The family of a woman and her adult son killed when a tree along the Garden State Parkway fell onto their car in 2008 can’t sue the operator of the toll road, an appeals court ruled Monday. A three-judge panel ruled that the New Jersey Turnpike Authority, which operates the Parkway, couldn’t have known that the 80-foot hickory tree might fall. Joel Baudouin, 42, of Arlington, Mass., and his mother Marie Vernet, 72, were killed when the tree crashed down on his Volkswagen Passat on Christmas morning in 2008. Baudouin’s two daughters, then 13 and 8, were seated in the back and injured…

Manchester, New Hampshire, Union Leader, May 3, 2017: Fallen tree limb knocks Epping runner out of road race

Runner Kara Lamprey was dealt a big setback Tuesday night when a large tree limb fell on her while she jogged the Rockingham Recreational Trail. Lamprey, who is training for upcoming 5K road races, says the weather was calm when she set out on her run. “I heard a crack and when I looked up it was too late. The whole branch was coming down on me,” she said Wednesday, as she prepared for surgery at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. Lamprey, 30, suffered a broken right tibia. The impact of the bough – estimated to be at least 12 inches in diameter – caused her fibula to bend and lacerated her leg…

Milford, Connecticut, Connecticut Bulletin, May 3, 2017: Tree-cutting utilities hit on debris

Area municipal leaders are sick of cleaning up after utility companies that leave stumps — and sometimes tree trunks — just lying there after workers take down trees as part of their work to maintain power lines. The South Central Regional Council of Governments recently voted to send a letter to United Illuminating, Eversource Energy and the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority, calling on UI and Eversource to clean up their acts, after East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo Jr. raised the issue. The council, made up of the chief elected officials or their designees from 15 Greater New Haven cities and towns, voted 10-1 to send the letter, with only Meriden City Manager Guy Scaife voting against it…

New Canaan, Connecticut, New Canaanite, May 2, 2017: Tree Warden to replace decaying oaks downtown with four elms

New Canaan’s tree warden has posted four dying pin oak trees on the first block of Elm Street downtown and plans to replace them with disease-resistant American elms. The “New Harmony” variety is crossbred with other resistant elms and “it’s the same branch pattern as an American elm, same type of shade tree as an American elm,” Tree Warden Bob Horan told NewCanaanite.com. “They will be a decent size tree, probably somewhere in a 3.5- to 4-inch caliper and what’s nice about these trees it will put elm trees back on Elm. It’s a straight trunk with that vase-shaped arching pattern, easily pruned so we can get some height out of them, so we won’t be hiding the storefronts down the road. So we are taking all of this into consideration…”

Troy, Ohio, Daily News, May 2, 2017: Council amends tree policies

On Monday, the Tipp City council approved an ordinance revising the city’s tree maintenance guidelines, allowing property owners to opt out of tree replacement. The ordinance amends several sections of Chapter 97 in the Tipp City Code of Ordinances in order to keep it up to date with current rules and regulations. The most significant change allows a property owner the ability to opt out of replacing trees that had been removed from the public right-of-way. Council approved the ordinance 5-1, with Mayor Pat Hale voting no. Council President Joe Gibson was absent. Hale said he could not vote for the ordinance in its current form, saying the way it’s written might allow property owners to object to new trees being planted as part of a streetscape program. “I don’t have a problem with this from the standpoint of a citizen that currently has a tree and then we go in and do work and tear it out, or it dies and gets torn out, giving somebody the opportunity to say, ‘Hey, it’s out, it’s gone. I really don’t want another tree there,” Hale said…

Seattle, Washington, KIRO-TV, May 2, 2017: 40 trees planted for deforestation awareness project now dead or dying

KIRO 7 went out to investigate when we heard trees along the Burke Gilman Trail in Kenmore painted blue 5 years ago were dying and people wondered if the blue paint was to blame. In 2012, 40 birch trees were painted blue as part of an art installation to raise awareness of deforestation. KIRO 7 crew noticed that less than half of the trees are still standing. And the remaining ones are dying. “It’s ugly to look at right out my front door,” Darcy Uphouse said. Uphouse lives across the street from the trees along the Burke Gilman Trail. “I see kids just walking by, pushing them over,” Uphouse added. “Over half are gone. Dead.” “It’s almost certainly caused by an insect called the bronze birch borer that has been attacking European white birch trees through Washington state for a number of years,” said arborist Steve Lambert with Lambert Tree Care…

Roseburg, Oregon, News Review, May 2, 2017: The technology behind growing trees

The wood products industry has implemented technological advances into each step of the process, from growing seedlings to monitoring tree health, and from milling to creating finished boards. “With forestry, our technology is amazing because it’s always changing,” said Casey Roscoe, senior vice president of public relations for Seneca Jones Timber Company. “We are always trying to figure out the best way to do things, whether it’s the technology that helps rivers thrive or technology that helps foresters do their jobs.” Learning how to best grow trees from seed onward is a constant endeavor, according to Jake Gibbs, director of external affairs for Lone Rock Resources. The Roseburg-based company sources its seeds locally to ensure it plants seedlings in the places they originated. “The technology of nurseries has improved, so now they are more consistent and they grow a healthy little tree that meets the specifications of each landowner,” Gibbs said…

Bay City, Michigan, Times, May 1, 2017: State orders tree company to cease operations again, issues $222,000 fine

A Bay County landscaping company has been ordered to suspend its business activities by the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affair. MIOSHA Director Shelly Edgerton announced Monday, May 1, that Monitor Township-based Sunset Tree Service & Landscaping, 2776 E. Fisher Road, was served a Cease Operations Order for “continuing to operate without abating hazards on the jobsite. MIOSHA also issued 12 citations totaling $222,000 in penalties. The agency ordered the business come to a halt due to a number of unresolved safety issues…

Atlanta, Georgia, Journal-Constitution, May 1, 2017: Tree company worker tries to shove coworker in wood chipper, police say

An Oregon man has been charged with attempted murder after being accused of trying to shove a coworker at a tree service company into a running wood chipper. Scott Edward Iverson, 26, of Stayton, is also charged with fourth-degree assault, according to Marion County Jail records. He is being held without bond. Keizer police officials told KPTV in Portland that Iverson and several other workers were working at a job site Thursday when he approached the victim, who was loading brush into the wood chipper, from behind. Iverson is accused of putting the man in a choke hold and pushing his upper torso onto the feed table of the machine. The victim, 22, told police he struggled with Iverson, who made a second attempt to throw him headfirst into the machine before another employee saw the struggle and pulled Iverson off of the man, KPTV reported. Iverson walked away from the scene, but police found him the following afternoon at a restaurant in nearby Stayton, which is located about 12 miles southeast of Salem…

Nashville, Tennessee, WTVF, May 1, 2017: Arborists say toppling trees can be prevented

Strong storms have blown through the south including in Middle Tennessee, knocking over trees, and making many homeowners nervous as they look outside to see their trees swaying in the wind. “We’ve had an enormous amount of storms this year, seems like they’re getting worse all the time,” Dean Glascock of Arbor Art Tree Care, said. Many trees can look healthy, but have problems that can make them more likely to fall or break in storms. “It’s really important that you call somebody that knows what they’re doing,” Glascock explained, adding that an arborist can spot issues due to their specialized training and education. “There could be fractures in the structure you wouldn’t know anything about. We have an eye for all of that…”

Fort Worth, Texas, Business Press, May 1, 2017: Tree protection ordinances targeted by Republicans, defended by city officials

An ongoing power struggle between state and local officials has made its way into Texans’ yards. State lawmakers on Monday took public input on one of several bills filed this year that would restrict the ability of cities to ban residents from cutting down trees on their properties. About 50 Texas cities have enacted such “tree protection” ordinances in an effort to preserve a natural aesthetic or protect property values — among other reasons. Republican lawmakers view the regulations as an assault on private property rights. But several city officials said they reflect the values of citizens in their communities and that whether to enact such rules is a decision best made at the local level. They also said House Bill 1572 could have unintended consequences. The legislation, filed by Austin Republican Paul Workman, would prohibit Texas cities from passing or enforcing ordinances that ban residents from removing trees they think pose a fire risk…

Ashland, Massachusetts, Wicked Local, April 30, 2017: 100 trees in Ashland to come down

More than 100 trees along downtown and scenic streets will come down as the result of a Planning Board vote Thursday. The ruling also said that Eversource should replace 10 trees with saplings, grind 10 stumps, or any combination of the two. Only a handful of trees were spared as the result of a lengthy, multi-day public hearing on the proposal, submitted by Eversource, the town’s utility provider. The trees were pegged for removal either because they were dying and in danger of falling, or near utility lines. Before the board voted, a debate ensued over whether to have Eversource replace trees or grind dangerous stumps. Eversource arborist Chris Gonzalez said he was prepared to plant 10 saplings to replace downed trees in especially scenic or environmentally beneficial locations. Kathy Rooney, member of the Forest Committee, argued that trees in Stone Park should certainly be replaced, and that areas left without canopy should take first priority. More sun invites more weed and invasive species, she said…

Albuquerque, New Mexico, KRQE-TV, April 29, 2017: Trees planted for Earth Day vandalized

The community came together in Albuquerque’s Wells Park neighborhood in mid-April to plant more than 100 trees for Earth Day, only to have them uprooted by vandals. Project organizers tell KRQE News 13 some of those trees have been ripped up. Two larger trees were taken, while five smaller ones were left on the ground next to the holes. There is no word on whether there are plans to replant the trees…

Mother Nature Network, April 30, 2017: 15 astounding facts about trees

It’s hard to overstate the importance of trees. Their debut more than 300 million years ago was a turning point for Earth, helping transform its surface into a bustling utopia for land animals. Trees have fed, housed and otherwise nurtured countless creatures over time — including our own arboreal ancestors. Modern humans rarely live in trees, but that doesn’t mean we can live without them. About 3 trillion trees currently exist, enriching habitats from old-growth forests to city streets. Yet despite our deep-rooted reliance on trees, we tend to take them for granted. People clear millions of forested acres every year, often for short-term rewards despite long-term risks like desertification, wildlife declines and climate change. Science is helping us learn to use trees’ resources more sustainably, and to protect vulnerable forests more effectively, but we still have a long way to go. Earth now has 46 percent fewer trees than it did 12,000 years ago, when agriculture was in its infancy. Yet despite all the deforestation since then, humans still can’t shake an instinctive fondness for trees. Their mere presence has been shown to make us calmer, happier and more creative, and often boosts our appraisal of property value. Trees hold deep symbolism in many religions, and cultures around the planet have long appreciated what a walk in the woods can do…

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 30, 2017: Tree falls across 2 campers at campground, killing girl, 10

Authorities say a tree fell across two campers in a Pennsylvania campground, killing a 10-year-old girl in one of the vehicles. LNP newspapers reports that emergency crews n Lancaster County were called to Oma’s Family Campground in Colerain Township at about 8:30 a.m. Sunday. Quarryville fire chief Joel Neff said emergency personnel had to cut the tree and the camper to reach the trapped girl, but found her unconscious and not breathing. Neff called it “a freak accident.” Dr. Steven Diamantoni, the Lancaster County coroner, said he believed the girl was from Perry County and she was the only one inside the camper. He said he believed her mother was sitting outside when the tree came down…

CBS News, April 27, 2017: Beloved 600-year old tree that witnessed history is taken down

Memories are all that remain of a 600-year-old white oak tree that was believed to be among the oldest of its kind in the nation. Workers finished removing the tree — which had a circumference of 18 feet and a branch spread of roughly 150 feet wide — from the grounds of the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church in Bernards on Wednesday. About 50 people clapped and cheered and the church’s bells rang as the tree’s large stump was pulled out. The tree was declared dead after it began showing rot and weakness during the last couple of years. When it’s life cycle ran out, the church began taking down the tree to prevent it from falling on its own and damaging the Revolutionary War headstones below it…

Columbia, Missouri, KOMU-TV, April 27, 2017: Owner of “Big Tree” says vandalization is hurting it

Boone County’s iconic “Big Tree” is being damaged by vandals spray painting its base, according to its owner, John Williamson. Chemicals in the paint can damage the tree, but Williamson said taking it sometimes causes more damage to the tree than the spray paint itself. “Unfortunately, there’s no good way to take that off. It would really be harder on the tree to remove any paint or anything like that.” That hasn’t stopped Williamson and friends from covering up the spray paint. He and a friend, Ana Lopez, put mud over the spray paint to keep the tree looking in its best shape possible. “It’s a constant battle of educating people,” Lopez said on how to prevent future vandalizing of the tree. “That’s all we can really try to do, is educate people. Hopefully people will want to keep the tree alive a little longer and not continue to abuse on it.” Big Tree, which sits just south of the small town of McBane, is more than 300 years old. At 74 feet tall and 294 inches in circumference, it is the biggest bur oak tree in North America. It is not known how much longer the tree has until it dies…

Chicago, Illinois, WBEZ Radio, April 27, 2017: Why you should care that tree species are going extinct

April 28 is Arbor Day, and experts report that tree species are vanishing at a rate of 1 out of 10. Recently, Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) released two years of research that found there are 60,065 tree species left in the world and that more than half of all tree species only occur in a single country. This lack of biodiversity could become catastrophic for the survival of trees species, that we depend on to maintain life on our planet. We talk about efforts to save many of the world’s trees from extinction with Nicole Cavender, vice president of Research and Conservation and Murphy Westwood is director of Global Tree Conservation at Morton Arboretum…

San Jose, California, Mercury News, April 27, 2017: Menlo Park: Hundreds of trees face PG&E’s ax

As many as 560 trees in Menlo Park could face the ax through a PG&E pipeline safety program. While roughly 200 trees on private properties are still being assessed, at least 100 in the public right of way are slated for removal, as well as approximately 262 on private lots. Of those private trees, 93 are heritage trees. Public Works Director Justin Murphy said none of the 200 trees being assessed are heritage trees. PG&E is offering to pay the city up to $327,500 for the trees’ removal — $1,500 per street tree, $1,000 per heritage tree and $500 per non-heritage private property tree. Murphy said he didn’t know how the prices were arrived at, but they came out of discussions between city and PG&E officials…

Oakland, California, East Bay Times, April 26, 2017: Lafayette residents see red over PG&E tree removals

A group of residents is pushing back against a deal between the city and Pacific Gas & Electric allowing for the removal of hundreds of trees on public and private property. Arguing the tree removals will impact Lafayette’s environment “for generations,” Save Lafayette Trees is asking the city, PG&E and the East Bay Regional Park District to create a plan to shield the gas pipeline along the Lafayette-Moraga Regional Trail, or move it so the trees won’t have to be cut down. About 500 supporters have signed the group’s Change.org petition asking the city council and PG&E to take action. The group wants the utility to release a detailed map of all 272 trees in Lafayette the utility plans to cut down, and post removal signs on the trees for 60 days. It also wants the city to notify each resident with an affected tree on their property that “they’re under no legal obligation to sign removal agreements with PG&E under state law…”

Midland, Texas, KMID-TV, April 26, 2017: Tree pollen stuffing Basin residents

High winds not too fun at a rapid speed and they can cause more problems than just blowing away possessions despite West Texas not having many trees. “The wide open spaces allow the wind to carry that pollen further. So, we’re all susceptible,” says Dr. David Davison. Dr. Davison knows the effects high amounts of tree pollen can have on the human body. “I like to think of it as starting at the top of the body and working down. The first area would be your eyes. Tree pollen can cause allergic conjunctivitis,” says Dr. Davidson. Pollen then moves to cause irritation in your nose, mouth and chest. Dr. Davison say’s that over the counter drugs such as Benedryl and Claritin can help treat allergy symptoms. Those with asthma should have their inhalers with them at all times. “A severe level would mean you really do have trouble breathing and you should get to the nearest emergency room if that happens,” says Davison…

Louisville, Kentucky, Courier-Journal, April 26, 2017: Louisville sells airspace over Seneca Park, gets better deal on trees than residents

Louisville has reached a $235,000 deal with airport officials to permanently sell airspace over part of Seneca Park, forever limiting tree and building heights extending from the end of two runways at Bowman Field. The new airspace easement and agreement covers an area off Pee Wee Reese Road, and a portion of the golf course for a total of about 30 acres, officials said. It also allows for trimming and removal of trees along city rights of ways on portions of Alanmede Road, Carson Way, Drayton Drive, Seneca Boulevard and Taylorsville Road and is part of what airport officials call their Bowman Field Airport Safety Program.City and airport officials described the deal as beneficial to both…

Forbes magazine, April 26, 2017: Where the streets are paved with green: Counting urban trees

I am a big fan of trees. Apart from the fact that they are beautiful, they also offer multiple benefits to cities (as I mentioned in a previous article). For a start, they lower the ambient temperature by absorbing shortwave radiation, and using much of it to evaporate water from their leaves…. A very useful thing at a time when the ‘urban heat island’ effect is putting unparalleled demand on energy supplies (mainly for air-con). Of course, trees also absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and produce oxygen, and their roots can help mitigate flooding during storms. In addition, there is widespread scientific consensus that green spaces have a positive impact on the health and well-being of a city’s residents. In short, cities need more trees. This isn’t news to anyone – in fact in in 2015, the World Economic Forum’s Council on the Future of Cities included ‘increasing green canopies’ in urban areas as a priority for the coming years. So now they’ve teamed up with researchers at MIT’s Senseable City Lab, to build an online database of urban trees, called Treepedia

New York City, Staten Island Advance, April 25, 2017: More tree-sparency under new city law

Talk about tree-sparency. The Parks Department post information about tree pruning, removals, planting and tree-related sidewalk inspections and repairs online under a bill from Minority Leader Steven Matteo that was signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday. De Blasio said the law will help “make government more effective.” “We’re making government more responsive, more efficient and a little more transparent,” Matteo (R-Mid-Island) added. The city’s pruning program is responsible for some 650,000 street trees citywide, including roughly 76,400 on Staten Island. The Parks Department must post quarterly reports on tree maintenance under the new law, including where and when the city plants and prunes trees or removes stumps, as well as the status of that work…

Die Hard Survivor, April 25, 2017: 3 ways the pine tree is one of the most versatile survival resources available

Survival situations require that you use whatever is at your disposal to gain control of and master your situation. During a survival situation, it is highly likely that you will have a very difficult time getting the nutrients, protein, vitamins and minerals you need to stay healthy. Other routine items we take for granted, like shelter, bedding and basic medicine will also become very difficult to secure. Luckily, in just about every area of the world, nature has given us an extremely versatile resource that addresses much of the above: the pine tree. Pine is prevalent virtually everywhere in North America and it can serve as many different survival and everyday functions if utilized properly…

Baltimore, Maryland, Sun, April 25, 2017: Tree planted on Queen Anne’s school pitcher’s mound may be a prank, police say

Authorities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore say someone planted a tree and scratched “Earth Day 2017” in the dirt on the pitcher’s mound of a high school baseball field in what may be a senior prank. The Queen Anne’s County sheriff’s office said in a statement on its Facebook site that the incident was noticed Saturday at Queen Anne’s County High School in Centreville. They say the tree sapling still had the $139.99 price tag attached. Police say the field has since been repaired and they are investigating the planting as a senior prank. They initially said the damage to the field could amount to more than $2,000…

Greensboro, North Carolina, WGHP-TV, April 25, 2017: Are trees around your home at risk of falling during a storm?

Heavy rain has caused flooding and brought down trees across the Piedmont. Tree removal professionals say now may be a good time to consider cutting down dead or diseased trees before heavy rain brings them down. They say a tree risk assessment will allow them to see if trees in your yard are at risk of falling. Colfax-based company Dillon Lawn and Tree Service spent part of Tuesday removing at-risk trees from Tom Harrison’s home in Greensboro. “There was just too much potential danger for falling on the house or a car, or God forbid some child [could] be walking by and get hit by a tree,” Harrison said…
St. Louis Park, Minnesota, Patch, April 23, 2017: More tree vandalism in the Twin Cities reported

City officials in the Minneapolis suburb of Robbinsdale have discovered several trees that they say have been intentionally damaged in Lakeview Terrace Park. At least one of the damaged trees will likely not survive, according to authorities. “The City takes pride in maintaining an urban canopy and doesn’t take the crime lightly,” officials said in a statement. “We ask that if residents see something, say something by calling 911.” Since March, the Dakota County Sheriff’s Office has been investigating recent damage to several large, mature black cherry trees in Eagan’s Lebanon Hills Regional Park…

Boston, Massachusetts, Globe, April 23, 2017: N.J. community reluctantly bids farewell to 600-year-old tree

For hundreds of years, an imposing white oak tree has watched over a New Jersey community and a church, providing protection from the blazing summer sun, and serving as a scenic backdrop for thousands of photos. According to legend, it was once a picnic site for George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette. But the tree — believed to be among the oldest in the nation — is not long for its place in the church graveyard that it’s called home for 600 years. Crews are due Monday at the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church in Bernards to begin removing the tree. The two to three days of chopping and pulling will draw attention from residents of a bedroom community about 30 miles west of New York that has long celebrated its white oak. It’s been the place to go for formal photos, a landmark for driving directions, and a remarkable piece of natural history…

Hagerstown, Maryland, Herald-Mail, April 23, 2017: Potomac Edison to continue trimming trees across Tri-State area

Across the Tri-State area in the coming months, residents can expect to see continued efforts by Potomac Edison to trim trees away from power lines as part of the company’s approximately $39 million vegetation-management program, officials said. The electric company works to clear limbs from power lines to help reduce tree-related outages, company officials said. Since the beginning of the year, tree contractors have cut limbs away from more than 600 miles of distribution and transmission lines, according to a news release from the power company. The work is being planned for another 2,250 miles of lines by the end of the year, the release said…

Tampa, Florida, Tampa Bay Times, April 23, 2017: Proposed update to Tampa tree protection rules designed to add clarity, predictability

As a young lobbyist for the Builders Association of Greater Tampa, one of Bob Buckhorn’s first tasks in the mid 1980s was to work on the city’s evolving tree code — a subject that rarely fails to combine technical detail with passionate advocacy. Today, three decades later, Buckhorn is still working on it. An update of the city’s tree and landscape code is headed to a City Council workshop Thursday, about a year behind the schedule City Hall set in late 2015. “It’s a complicated process, and we wanted to make sure we did it right,” Buckhorn said, “but, yes, it did take longer than I had hoped.” In 2012, an Economic Competitiveness Committee appointed by Buckhorn called Tampa’s tree code vague and unorganized, with unrealistic, inflexible and unnecessarily expensive rules. But before officials rewrote the code, they commissioned a $200,000 update of the city’s tree canopy study. Done by University of Florida and University of South Florida forestry experts, the study found that Tampa’s tree canopy is “very young,” with a small percentage of trees with large-diameter trunks, said Bob McDonaugh, the city’s top economic development official. And there’s not a lot of diversity, making the canopy more susceptible to storm damage, disease and pests…

Jackson, Michigan, Citizen-Patriot, April 20, 2017: Massive oak tree splits in half, smashes several Jackson garages

A large, double-trunk oak tree came crashing down on Jackson’s west side Thursday afternoon, crushing a handful of garages along N. Brown Street. Firefighters with the Jackson Fire Department responded to the 200 block of N. Brown Street just before 4 p.m. April 20, where the towering tree, which had split down the middle, had obliterated one resident’s garage and severely or partially damaged three others. Jackson Fire Capt. Bob Walkowicz, who was on scene with city inspectors around, confirmed three of the structures hit by the falling tree had been condemned by the city. “The inspection department is taking pictures and they’ve already condemned the three structures, the three garages,” Walkowicz said. “They will need further attention (but) we have secured the power to … two garages, where they’re not any threat; the power’s not still on to them…”

New Orleans, Louisiana, WWL-TV, April 20, 2017: Thieves pulling trees out of the ground in Broadmoor

Tuesday, four olive trees were reported stolen, uprooted right from the ground from South Prieur, and General Taylor. Just two blocks down, the same thing had happened to Karen Chustz’s magnolia trees. “One day I’m picking up trash something looks different, and I see a huge hole,” Chustz’s said. “So somebody had stolen three of my trees right out of the ground and left two.” Angered, she gave the other plants to neighbors so thieves wouldn’t have a chance to finish the job. “At the time they had been planted for a year and a half, and so they were so so high,” she said. Of course, some might say, they’re just plants, it’s not a big deal. Owners like Chustz say they’re still personal property and they mean something…

NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, Tester, April 20, 2017: Pax River American elm tree may help save species

From coast to coast, American elms were the tree of choice to line Main Street USA because of their spreading canopies that gracefully arched across roadways and shaded residents below. “Cedar Point Road aboard NAS Patuxent River was also once lined with American elm trees from Route 235 to the water, and along Millstone Road from Cedar Point to Millstone Landing,” said Kyle Rambo, Pax River’s conservation director. “They were a very common tree here, but we’ve lost hundreds of them on the installation due to Dutch elm disease.” Dutch elm disease is a lethal fungus that was introduced in the United States by accident in the 1930s via infected logs from Europe. Spread by bark beetles, it has been responsible for the deaths of American elm trees by the hundreds of thousands throughout the country. “We’ve been watching them go and it’s a painful thing to see; like a piece of America that’s disappearing,” Rambo said. “There are some elms left on Cedar Point Road but you can tell they’re sick. They’re bigger, gnarly-looking trees with dead limbs and sap weeping down the sides of the trunk. There are some expensive treatments, but once the fungus has spread within them, it’s really a losing battle…”

Belen, New Mexico, News-Bulletin, April 20, 2017: Armstrong arrested, cited for defending large trees

A Belen man was arrested Monday afternoon after he says he was trying to save trees from being cut down in his neighborhood. Pete Armstrong, 69, a member of the city’s planning and zoning commission, a member of the Belen Rotary Club and a past president of the Greater Belen Chamber of Commerce, was taken into custody by Belen police and has been charged with one count of assault, a petty misdemeanor. Armstrong brought a piece of one of the trees that were cut down by a company contracted by the city to cut down trees to Monday’s city council meeting. He told the council he would do it again if he could save just one more tree. “There is nothing wrong with it,” Armstrong told the councilors Monday as he held up the large piece of tree for them to see. “It was in front of my neighbor’s yard.” Armstrong, a retired landscaper, told the councilors about his arrest, saying he was talking to the contractor that the city hired to take down trees in his neighborhood. He said it was the eighth large tree that the city had cut down in a week…

Seattle, Washington, KCPQ(TV), April 19, 2017: Tree-cutting West Seattle homeowners fined $440,000; city warns it could have been even more

The city of Seattle is taking a stand against cutting down city-owned trees. Now, West Seattle homeowners who admitted to chopping down dozens of green space trees will have to pay. That price tag for two families is $440,000 as part of a settlement agreement announced Wednesday. The more 70 trees, each about six inches in diameter, used to grow on a steep slope above Admiral Way in West Seattle. The city says the neighbors simply wanted a better view. Trees are a vital resource,” says City Attorney Pete Holmes, “and this settlement puts people on notice that we will not allow any unauthorized cutting of city-owned trees.” This is the partial city view from the front deck view that Marty and Karrie Riemer have at their home where 35th Avenue SW dead ends into the green space. The neighbors across the street, Stanley and Mary Harrelson, face the identical penalties. No one was home at either house when Q13 News reached out for reaction to the settlement. In what amounts to about $6,000 per chopped down tree, it’s a price the city attorney Pete Holmes says is actually a good deal. Holmes says they would have levied much larger fines against the homeowners if the two families didn’t name 11 other neighbors who may have been a part of this and another separate clearing of trees nearby. The second clearing of trees brings the felled tree count to a total of around 150. These 11 neighbors now face similar charges and fines in a new revised legal complaint…

Canandaigua, New York, Daily Messenger, April 19, 2017: Trees to take root in Victor

The tree-killing emerald ash borer made its way into Victor Municipal Park, damaging numerous ash trees in the 47-acre park. Now that crews with the town and village have removed those diseased trees, the ground is ready for planting. On Saturday, April 29, volunteers will dig in for the annual Village of Victor Arbor Day celebration. As in previous events, everyone is invited to join in. Forty trees will be ready to take root in the park on Paparone Drive. The mix of new trees will include: European larch, concolor fir, Norway spruce, London planetree, swamp oak, catalpa, river birch, dawn redwood, elm, Kentucky coffeetree and hackberry…

Ask Ghost, April 19, 2017: How is this even possible, giant tree relocated in India

Finding it hard to digest this VIDEO asGiant Tree Relocated in INDIA is the craziest thing I have ever seen. India is well known for its love for nature, but this time they raised the standards to next level by saving this old tree. This tree in India grew old and helped countless citizens of Nagpur City. But when Nagpur Metro Train route crossed the land already occupied by this amazing tree, Nagpur metro rail corporation limited (NMRCL) decided to do something unthinkable for this amazing tree. Instead of killing or chopping it down for the standing between the Metro Train Route. NMRCL decided to relocate the tree to a nearby spot…

Los Angeles, California, LAist, April 19, 2017: Southern California’s trees are dying, and the effects could cost $36 billion

Let’s clear up misconceptions first: Los Angeles is not a desert. Los Angeles is a semi-arid zone with a Mediterranean climate. The distinction may sound small, almost semantic, but when you look to the hills or the undeveloped lands north of the Valley you don’t see sand dunes, you see oak trees and chaparral. Los Angeles and the rest of Southern California has spent the better part of a century building up its vegetation (a drive down the tree-canopied streets of Bel Air or Pasadena’s Oak Knoll will make this readily apparent), but all that may be changing. The Southland is in the midst of a massive tree die-off. “We’re witnessing a transition to a post-oasis landscape in Southern California,” Greg McPherson, supervisory research forester at the U.S. Forest Service, said, notes the Los Angeles Times. “Many of the trees we grow evolved in temperate climates and can’t tolerate the stress of drought, water restrictions, higher salinity levels in recycled water, wind and new pests that arrive almost daily via global trade and tourism, local transportation systems, nurseries and the movement of infected firewood.” One of these pests is the polyphagous shot hole borer beetle, already found in parts of the Southland. McPherson conducted a recent survey that concluded that the effects of this single beetle could kill off 38% (27 million) of trees throughout Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, and Riverside counties, causing irrecoverable losses to the ecosystem and some $36 billion in economic damages…

CBS News, April 18, 2017: Capitol Hill worker killed by falling branch

A freak accident has taken the life of a Capitol Hill worker. “It is with deep sorrow that we announce the passing of Architect of the Capitol employee, Matthew McClanahan, following an accident on the U.S. Capitol Grounds,” Stephen T. Ayers, the architect of the Capitol, said in a statement Tuesday afternoon. “A large branch of an American Elm fell and struck Matt, who was working nearby on an irrigation pipe. Matt was a talented, dedicated pipefitter in the Maintenance Division of Capitol Grounds. Please keep his family, friends and colleagues in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.” McClanahan is survived by his wife, Lauren, and their children Evie and Andrew. He was transferred to a local hospital after being removed from under the tree by the fire department employees and EMS technicians, according to WUSA. The accident happened around 9:15 a.m…

Wausau, Wisconsin, WSAW-TV, April 18, 2017: Thieves stealing trees as demand for birch furniture and home decor skyrockets

Candle holders, coffee tables, coat racks and even bed frames all made of white birch are fueling a bizarre case of tree thefts– primarily in northern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Parks, forests and even private lands have fallen victim. “Most likely it’s going to lodges, cabins, more rustic feeling homes,” said Scottie’s Interiors owner Lecia Marks-Franson. Harvesting the white birch trees without a permit or on land that isn’t owned by the harvester, is illegal. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Warden Supervisor Dave Walz said incidents of birch theft cases are on the rise…

Bismarck, North Dakota, KXMB-TV, April 18, 2017: Tree Study Brings New Species to Western North Dakota

“Can’t complain about getting free trees,” says Williston City Forester, Bruce Johnson. And cities like Minot, Bismarck, Dickinson and Williston will be getting plenty of them. As part of a tree study conducted by the NDSU Extension Service, 20 tree varieties will be planted to test whether they will survive in the region. In Williston, homeowners who have previously had a diseased boulevard tree removed from their home will get priority. “This year, we want to use our open boulevards. Trees that were lost to Dutch Elm disease over the last 15-20 years. That way the homeowners don’t have to come up with any money themselves and plant trees in the boulevard,” says Johnson…

Chesapeake, Virginia, AP, April 18, 2017: Tree trimmer dies after being shocked by power line

Police say a tree trimmer has died after being shocked by a power line. WAVY-TV reported Tuesday that the man was suspended in a tree removing some limbs Monday afternoon. One of the branches was touching the man when it also struck a live wire. Police in Chesapeake confirmed the death on Tuesday. Authorities identified him as 39-year-old Muhammad Yahya Abdur-Raheem. He lived in Newport News. Dominion Virginia Power says he worked for Lucas Tree Experts, which the agency contracted for removal services. WAVY said the company has not responded to a request for further comment…

Fox News, April 17, 2017: New database gives tree scientists an important first

Tree lovers, take note: A new database called GlobalTreeSearch has for the first time provided a tally of all the world’s tree species. The answer: 60,065. Scientists from Botanic Gardens Conservation International in the UK spent two years compiling the database, relying on information from 500 published sources and from local experts around the world, reports NPR. In an article in the Journal of Sustainable Forestry, they note that it’s the first overview of all known tree species by scientific name. The database will be “hugely useful for us in prioritizing which ones we need to do conservation action on and which ones we need to do assessments to find out what their status is,” says BGCI exec Paul Smith. Among their findings: Brazil is home to the highest number of species at 8,715, and 58% of trees grow in just one nation, making them vulnerable if whatever country that happens to be is lax on protection…

New England Sports Network, April 17, 2017: This sad attempt to two out tree stump with SUV goes horribly wrong

Among the many interesting things about trees is how deeply rooted in the ground they often are. You’d think this would dissuade people from attempting to yank them out of the ground with anything other than a backhoe, but the world still is filled with many people who throw common sense to the wind. In a video recently uploaded to YouTube by Khaled A., someone can be seen attempting to tow a tree out of the ground with an SUV, and it goes about as well as you’d expect. After putting up with the vehicle’s persistent nagging, the tree finally fights back…

Sonora, California, myMotherlode.com, April 17, 2017: What To Replant After The Trees Die

The Sierra Nevada in is experiencing an unprecedented die off of trees on both private and public lands. Removing dead trees from your landscape is important, especially around the home, to prevent damage from falling trees to homes and infrastructure. Dead trees will also eventually fall to become large fuels on the forest floor leading to more intense fires. It is important to assess what is left after tree removal before considering replanting, as there is often a lot of live vegetation remaining. If you have a significant number of trees left, you may not need to replant. Make a survey of your property; map what is growing and where. Ponderosa pines grow well only in sunny conditions and do not tolerate shade. You may find young pines growing in sunny gaps created by canopy trees dying. Incense cedar and white fir tolerate shade and are often found growing in the understory. Oaks may be doing well where nearby conifers have died. Oaks have the ability to drop leaves during drought and can also re-sprout if their tops are killed. So, even oaks that look dead may be able to rebound. You may want to promote the smaller trees left after the dead ones have been removed. Thin trees out so that available sun and soil moisture is focused on the healthiest individuals. (Some watering of these trees in the summer may help counter stress caused by increased solar radiation.) Consider clearing out shrubs, grass and other competition. Digging up natural conifer seedlings and moving them is NOT recommended as this can harm the tree’s already developed root system…

Spokane, Washington, KREM-TV, April 17, 2017: City council members seek answers in South Hill tree removal incident

Spokane City Council members Breean Beggs and Lori Kinnear are seeking answers after dozens of trees along the South Hill bluff were bulldozed by mistake. A contractor bulldozed a road and removed the trees near the Qualchan Golf Course. As of Friday evening, no involved party has taken responsibility for approving the removal of trees on the bluff. The Parks Department and Avista confirmed that they never gave authorization to a logging company for destruction of the landscape and tree cutting…

AP, April 16, 2017: For tree lovers and woodworkers, there’s beauty in a burl

As you glance up into tree limbs, perhaps searching for some sign of spring in a swelling flower bud, your sight might be arrested by fat, rounded growths on the bark. On some trees, these hard, woody outgrowths — called burls — stand out on an otherwise clear trunk like a goiter. On other trees, the whole trunk might be covered with these masses. If you’ve never noticed these growths before, don’t be alarmed. They cause little or no harm to the tree. That said, burls might — just might — indicate that the tree has been under stress. All sorts of things have been implicated as the cause of burls. For instance, a burl could grow in response to a limb rubbing against the bark, to chewing by insects or some other physical injury. Perhaps the tree experienced or is experiencing some environmental stress — temperatures too cold or too hot, not enough food or not enough sunlight, for example. Diseases have also been held responsible for burls. However, no pathogens are found inside burls when they are cut open. Still, a pathogen could have done its job of inducing a burl, and then skipped on to other adventures. We could also blame genetics, because some tree species are more prone to developing burls than others. Redwoods are renowned for their burls, which are often sold as souvenirs…

Ipswich, Massachusetts, Wicked Local, April 16, 2017: Ipswich DPW worker seriously injured by falling tree

An Ipswich Department of Public Works employee was injured by a falling tree Sunday, according to Ipswich Police Chief Paul Nikas. At approximately 10:20 a.m., Acting Fire Chief Jeff French called into the Ipswich Communications Center requesting a medical helicopter to transport an injured Ipswich DPW worker who had been struck by a falling tree. Ipswich firefighters, along with members from the Massachusetts Bureau of Forest Fire Control and Ipswich DPW crews, were conducting overhaul operations in the forests off Pineswamp Road and Linebrook Road in Ipswich. The overhaul operations are designed to seek out and wet down hot spots left over from Saturday’s forest fires, which 14 area fire departments were called in to extinguish. Fire crews remained on scene conducting overhaul operations later Sunday…

New Providence, New Jersey, TAPInto, April 16, 2016: JCP&L’s 2017 Tree Trimming Program Underway Work Includes 3,600 Miles of Lines and Will Help Enhance Reliability

Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) plans to spend nearly $34 million in 2017 to trim trees along 3,600 miles of power lines to maintain proper clearances around electrical equipment and help prevent tree-related outages. During April and May, the work is being performed in nearly 80 municipalities across JCP&L’s 13-county northern and central New Jersey service areas.“Proper tree trimming helps reduce the frequency and duration of power outages,” said Mark Jones, vice president, Operations, JCP&L. “Our foresters and certified tree experts work year-round to properly maintain trees and vegetation. This work pays dividends in fewer service disruptions, particularly during severe storms that can do tremendous damage to trees, which then have the potential to damage our equipment.” JCP&L’s tree trimming program, conducted by certified forestry contractors under the company’s direction, includes inspecting vegetation near the lines to ensure trees are pruned in a manner that helps preserve the health of the tree, while also maintaining safety near electric facilities. Trees that present a danger or are diseased may also be removed. As part of the notification process, JCP&L works with municipalities to inform them of vegetation management schedules. In addition, customers living in areas along company rights-of-way are notified prior to work being performed. To further decrease tree-related outages, JCP&L’s foresters also are working to educate residents who live near company equipment about the importance of properly maintaining the trees on their own property…

West Palm Beach, Florida, WPTV, April 16, 2017: Study: More beetles can carry disease killing avocado trees

University of Florida researchers say they’ve found more beetles that can carry a disease threatening avocado trees. The redbay ambrosia beetle considered the main carrier of laurel wilt is rare in avocado groves. But in a new study in the Journal of Economic Entomology, plant pathology professor Randy Ploetz said scientists found three more beetles that can carry the tree-killing disease. Ploetz says the study shows that focusing on redbay ambrosia beetles may not save avocado trees from laurel wilt. Jonathan Crane at the university’s Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead says avocado growers “have known for some time that other ambrosia beetle species” can spread disease in their groves…

St. George, Utah, Independent, April 13, 2017: Topping hurts trees

Every year, there are beautiful trees whose lives will be cut short by improper pruning. The indiscriminate cutting of tree branches can ruin your trees. St. George is a unique city in the desert southwest. We are a community with a wonderful urban forest. Our downtown streets are lined with shade trees. We as a community take pride in our “oasis” in the desert. Our trees provide shade and relief from our hot summer sun. The practice of topping causes a tree to go into stress mode. When a tree is topped, 50 to 100 percent of leafed branches are removed, taking away the tree’s food source. Trees store carbohydrates or “food” in their branches, trunks, and roots. Topping a tree can remove valuable energy stores and a tree’s ability to perform photosynthesis. When all of a tree’s leaves are removed, a tree will sprout water suckers from dormant buds along the remaining branches. Water suckers are fast growing branches that have a weak attachment to the tree’s trunk. These branches are where future branch failures can and will occur…

Seattle, Washington, Times, April 13, 2017: Seeing the forest for the trees: What one oak tells us about climate change

It is the time we wait for all winter, as spring’s first green leaves unfurl. The joy we feel is the thrill of a new season, kicked off by the masterful work of trees. Trees, it turns out, are up to far more marvelous things than we ordinarily think. Mute, passive, unmoving, solitary? Actually, no. Trees talk. Move. Breathe. So numerous are their abilities, and so embedded in a continuum of thrumming life are trees, that to know even one well is to be dazzled. I learned this from one tree, in particular: a big oak I got to know over the better part of two years, from the tossed sunlit glory of its airy crown, to the small skitter of busy lives in the soil at its roots. It all started by working with a scientist and his research crew, probing deeply into the lives of trees at Harvard Forest, a 4,000-acre laboratory of mostly scrappy third-growth trees, on former pastures and farms west of Boston. I was interested as a journalist in looking for new and better ways to tell the story of our changing climate. It has been a yawner for too many — a distant debate about treaties, dueling science and doomsday scenarios. The stakes are high: the function of natural processes; the viability of habitats; even the survival of species, including our own. But the facts won’t matter if we can’t get anyone to pay attention…

Gizmodo, April 13, 2017: Apple is buying all the good trees for its new campus, and the tree people are fighting back

A tough truth about Apple is making headlines this week, and you’d better hold on to your butts, because it is salacious. Apparently, Apple is snatching up all the very best trees for its new campus, leaving local tree purchasers scrambling for solutions. The scoop was buried in a recent San Francisco Chronicle story about construction of the Transbay Transit Center in San Francisco. One of the futuristic travel station’s highlights is a 5.4-acre green roof which will eventually feature 469 trees (nice). The paper’s J.K. Dineen reports on the struggle to find all those trees: Buying trees is a surprisingly cutthroat business. And it’s been especially challenging to locate desirable specimens because Apple has been buying up 3,000 trees for its new Cupertino headquarters. When Greenspan and Trollip found a tree they fancied they would “tag it” with a locking yellow tag, so that nobody else — like Apple — could get it. Eventually all the tagged trees were moved to a nursery in Sunol, where the transbay project team leased 4 acres. Whoa, Greenspan and Trollip are taking this very seriously. And they should be…

Atlanta, Georgia, Journal-Constitution, April 13, 2017: Trees inside sewer lines? DeKalb spends $7.2M to clean them out

For more than 50 years, trees took root and grease built up inside DeKalb County sewer lines. These blocked pipes caused repeated sewage spills and threatened the county’s ability to grow. The DeKalb Board of Commissioners voted 7-0 on Tuesday to clean congested sewer trunk lines for the first time in decades. Government officials hope the $7.2 million cleaning contract will allow the county to add sewer capacity without having to spend far more money on new infrastructure…

San Francisco, California, SFist, April 12, 2017: The Great tree fight: How Eucalyptus Trees have divided Bay Area environmentalists for decades

If you’re relatively new to the Bay Area, and particularly if you’ve never lived or spent much time in the East Bay, it will be news to you that a great many people passionately despise the eucalyptus trees that are clustered throughout the Oakland and Berkeley hills, and around the UC Berkeley campus. The bath-shop-scented, stripe-barked, tall beauties, technically called Tasmanian blue gum trees, have elongated leaves that create a pleasant hushed rustling in the breeze. But they are not native to the Bay Area, and they’ve long been pointed to as a primary culprit in the Oakland Hills Fire of 1991. Many people still love them, have tied themselves naked to their trunks to protect them, and they deny that they have any special flammability and see them as vital habitat for birds and other species. These eucalyptus lovers also don’t think that whatever could be planted to replace them will be any less of a fire hazard in what is already a fire-prone region. The Chronicle’s East Bay columnist Chip Johnson came down on the side of “chop them all down” in a 2015 column about the trees, arguing that “human life tops the list” of things we should be worried about preserving. At the time, a project was set to begin with the help of a $4.6 million federal grant to thin the forest along a 20-mile stretch of the East Bay ridgeline, cutting down eucalyptus trees along with diseased or dying Monterey pines and other non-native species. Johnson quotes a UC Berkeley professor of fire sciences, Scott Stephens, who says the eucalyptus trees are absolutely a hazard even if they aren’t close by. He points to the university’s effort to clear trees on the upper slopes surrounding the campus because the trees can burn at such high intensity that they can deposit embers more than a mile downslope from them. “Given the conditions of the hills and the vulnerabilities of the people living in the area, it’s the right thing to do,” Stephens said, “and the next time we get a great, big fire, we’re going to be happy that we did this…”

Syracuse, New York, WSYR Radio, April 12, 2017: Syracuse Man Arrested For Tree Vandalism

A Syracuse man has been arrested after city police say he caused more than 25 thousand dollars in damage in several city parks. 30 year old David Thomas is accused of using his car to run down over 60 tree at those parks. The parks that were hit include McChesney Park, Schiller Park and Rose Hill Cemetery. Thomas has now been charged with criminal mischief and city police say they don’t know the reason Thomas wanted to damage the trees. Most of the small trees were completely uprooted and damaged to the point that they are now expected to survive if they were replanted…

Pasadena, California, KPCC(FM), April 12, 2017: There are 60,000-plus tree species worldwide, scientists say

Wondering how many kinds of trees there are? There’s now a database that can answer that. Scientists from the U.K.-based Botanic Gardens Conservation International say they have compiled the first-ever comprehensive list of all known tree species, totaling 60,065 different kinds. The database includes information about where each species is found geographically. More than half of those species are only found in one country, the researchers wrote in the Journal of Sustainable Forestry. And many of them are threatened with extinction. The researchers hope the database, called GlobalTreeSearch, will provide a practical tool for conservationists. It could help to develop “species-specific action” for threatened trees, they stated, “as individual tree species face threats that are unique to that species…

Seattle, Washington, KIRO Radio, April 12, 2017: Worker killed in logging accident at Snoqualmie Tree Farm

A worker died from injuries received while operating logging equipment on the Snoqualmie Tree Farm. On Tuesday at about 2 p.m., firefighters from the Snoqualmie Fire Department were called to a report that a logging worker had been seriously hurt while on the job at a site 26 miles into the tree farm. Fire crews were escorted to the site by the Campbell Global Timber Management security division. The trip took about an hour because of the rough terrain. When crews arrived, they found the victim about 500 yards down a steep embankment…

Mansfield, Ohio, News-Journal, April 10, 2017: ‘Shawshank Redemption’ tree – what was left, anyway – cut down

The last remaining vestiges of the tall oak tree beloved by fans of “The Shawshank Redemption” was taken down Saturday by a co-owner of the field in which it stood. Dan Dees said it was time for what was left of the damaged tree, on Pleasant Valley Road, near Malabar Farm State Park, to disappear. His father would like to farm that land, he said. The huge oak tree was featured in a scene in which Red (Morgan Freeman), paroled from prison, walked along a hayfield and removed stones from a rock wall where Andy (Tim Robbins) had buried money embezzled by the warden. The big oak. located a little east of the entrance to Malabar Farm State Park, was a popular stop on the Richland County Convention and Visitors Bureau’s “Shawshank Trail” driving tour, which took advantage of the movie’s wide popularity, encouraging tourists to visit some of the sites where “Shawshank” was filmed…

Agri-news, September 10, 2017: 10 steps to successful tree planting

Successful tree planting depends on a well-planned and executed approach. Lenny Farlee, Extension forester at Purdue University, shared advice about planting trees and shrubs for conservation purposes. “When we think about conservation planting, a lot of it started in the 1920s and ’30s in Indiana,” he said. “It was in relation to some pretty bad choices we had made in terms of landscape management. “There were a lot of agricultural practices done on land that couldn’t sustain those practices. It ended up in a lot of erosion.” Now trees often are planted to provide wildlife habitats, improve environmental quality, provide future timber production, sequester carbon and more. Farlee shared 10 tips for planting trees…

Windsor, Ontario, Star, April 10, 2017: Controversial tree cutting to start next week in transmission corridor

A Hydro One official said Tuesday 100 “danger trees” will be cut down within a six-kilometre high-voltage transmission corridor between LaSalle and Windsor but denies there would be any clear-cutting. LaSalle Mayor Ken Antaya said he heard clear-cutting was the plan for the corridor linking Brunet Park to Windsor’s Keith transmission station, a route which slices through the town’s environmentally sensitive LaSalle Woodlot. “The character of the entire woodlot would be destroyed,” Antaya said, who has called on Hydro One to handle the situation in its right-of-way “in an accountable way.” On Tuesday, the utility was trying to allay concerns. It held a morning news conference followed by an afternoon meeting with Antaya and town councillors to explain its intent. Hydro One area superintendent Jake Zink told the Star there is no plan to clear-cut and create a meadow through the corridor, which runs for two kilometres in LaSalle, from Brunet Park to Todd Lane, and four kilometres in Windsor from Todd Lane to the transmission station. Zink said a total of about 100 “danger trees” need to be taken down, 60 to 65 of them in LaSalle…

Santa Barbara, California, KEYT-TV, April 10, 2017: Man killed in tree-trimming accident near Gaviota identified

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office has identified 38-year-old Carpinteria resident Marcelino Gorostieta as the man tragically killed in Monday’s tree trimming accident at Hollister Ranch near Gaviota. The Santa Barbara County Fire Department was dispatched to the ranch at 10 a.m. but medical personnel pronounced the man dead at the scene, according to Santa Barbara County Fire Capt. Dave Zaniboni. The victim has not been identified pending next-of-kin notification. The Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Coroner’s Office is investigating the death…

New York City The Wall Street Journal, April 9, 2017: The oak that shaded George Washington

In a few weeks, my town will bid farewell to its eldest resident, departing this world at age 600. Or 550 or 500—no one knows for sure. The great white oak standing beside the Presbyterian Church in the center of town is one of the oldest of its kind in North America. Even before the announcement last fall that the ailing tree could not be saved, visitors had been arriving in steady streams to gaze at the barren branches, trimmed and truncated—the remains of a once-massive canopy shading the tombstones of 35 Revolutionary War veterans. It’s strange that a tree could elicit feelings normally reserved for a loved one. But that’s exactly the way many think of the great oak: as a beloved figure around which the town grew from a small log cabin built 300 years ago…

Washington, D.C., WJLA-TV, April 10, 2017: Cherry trees damaged by cold temps, tornado in D.C. to be replaced

Days after an EF-0 tornado hopped around the Tidal Basin, a path of destruction is left behind. Twisted branches are scattered, cordoned off by yellow caution tape. Tree trunks are snapped like matchwood. Debris is piled up, among the sawed-off remains of giant trunks. “Mother Nature’s a beast,” says Dan Marcy, a visitor from New York state. “This is a little surprising. I was unaware a tornado that came through last week.” The shriek of chainsaws and the roar of wood chippers echoed across the basin Friday. The National Park Service says nine trees were damaged or destroyed by the storm. Four of them were cherry trees…

AP, April 10, 2017: Forget roses and birds. These folks like their big trees

A program in New Hampshire is working to protect the state’s vast forests, one tree at a time. Known as the New Hampshire Big Tree Program, it encourages residents to search the city’s streets, backyards and woods for the state’s largest trees. Then, a team of volunteers goes out to measure a tree’s circumference, height and crown to determine if they are county or state champs — or just leafy pretenders. More than 700 champions so far have been identified, including 10 that are the biggest in the country. The hope is that by searching for champions, residents will be motivated to protect forests from threats like development and forest pests…

Outdoor News, April 10, 2017, Wisconsin birch trees axed by thieves

People with axes and chain saws are plundering parks, forests and private land in Wisconsin’s Northwoods to cut down thousands of white birch trees. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources held a meeting late last week for law enforcement agencies, county foresters and others to address the issue, the Journal Sentinel reported. A story documenting similar activity in northern Minnesota, too, appeared last week on the Outdoor Newswebsite. And, it appears, the incidents are driven by the same thing. Natural resources department warden David Zebro said that many of the trees are sold to decorate homes, businesses and weddings. “It appears to be all market-driven,” Zebro said. “The ornamental market people are paying a lot of money for these types of birch trees. We didn’t see this type of issue a year or two ago, but it’s certainly here now…”Middletown, New York, Times-Herald, April 9, 2017: Residents angry over tree-clearing in Woodbury Junction development

Jaime Walker used to have a line of trees and bushes as a screen of privacy behind the new house she bought four years ago in the partially built Woodbury Junction development. That all disappeared one Saturday last month while she wasn’t home. At the builder’s behest, tree cutters mowed down all vegetation across the hill behind her backyard. They took down some trees on her property as collateral damage and also cleared part of what was supposed to be protected green space. Construction has resumed in earnest at Woodbury Junction, just a little over a year after a Brooklyn developer paid $35.5 million for 327 undeveloped building lots in the stalled, 451-home project. Building permits have been issued for the next dozen homes, roads are being built, and formerly empty houses and vacant building lots have been sold. But residents who moved there before the project changed hands have watched with mounting frustration as old problems with the development persist and new ones – like the unexpected tree clearing – crop up…

Waterloo, Iowa, KWWL-TV, April 9, 2017: Cedar Falls stops ash tree removal to seek borer treatment

The city of Cedar Falls is halting its removal of healthy ash trees to consider treatment alternatives in the wake of destruction by an invasive insect. City director of municipal operations Mark Ripplinger tells the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier that he recently suspended the removal of healthy ash trees after learning of advancements in treatment of trees infected by the emerald ash borer. Ripplinger says his staff will present a plan by May 1 to the council to allow property owners to treat ash trees in the right of way adjacent to their property at their own expense. So far, the city has removed about 900 ash trees

San Francisco, California, Chronicle, April 8, 2017: California’s huge tree die-off expected to slow after wet winter

California’s extraordinarily wet winter didn’t just end the drought. It’s likely to mean a turnaround for the state’s dying forests. After five years of dry weather unleashed unparalleled havoc on trees from Yosemite to the Central Coast — leaving vast stands of pine too parched to fight pests and reducing entire mountainsides to browning wastelands — a forecast by the U.S. Forest Service suggests the die-off will slow this year. The projection, made public earlier this year, is short on specifics. But it mirrors the opinion of many forestry experts who say fewer trees will perish as rainy weather helps California’s woodlands regain their natural defenses against the ravenous bark beetle. “When we’ve had huge precipitation years, the mortality declines in the same or next year,” said Sheri Smith, a regional entomologist for the Forest Service. “It’s not like there isn’t going to be any new mortality, but we’re going to see a tremendous drop…”

Gardening Know How, April 9, 2017: Oak tree gall mites: learn how to get rid of oak mites

Oak leaf gall mites are more of a problem for humans than for oak trees. These insects live inside the galls on oak leaves. If they leave the galls in search of other food, they can be a true nuisance. Their bites are itchy and painful. So exactly what are oak leaf mites? What is effective in treating for oak mites? If you want more information on how to get rid of oak mites, also called oak leaf itch mites, read on. Oak tree gall mites are tiny parasites that attack gall larvae on oak leaves. When we say tiny, we mean tiny! You may not be able to spot one of these mites without a magnifying glass. The female and male oak tree gall mites mate. Once the females are fertilized, they enter the gall and paralyze the larvae with their venom. The female mites then feed on the larvae until their offspring emerge. An entire generation of oak mites can emerge in a single week, which means that the mite population can swell rapidly. Once the oak tree gall mites have eaten the gall larvae, they leave in search of other food…

Staten Island Live, April 6, 2017: City tree maintenance will get more transparent

City tree maintenance won’t be a mys-tree anymore. The Parks Department will have to post information about tree pruning, removals, planting and tree-related sidewalk inspections and repairs online under a bill from Minority Leader Steven Matteo that passed the Council on Wednesday. The city’s pruning program is responsible for some 650,000 street trees citywide, including roughly 76,400 on Staten Island. “This legislation will bring more accountability and predictability to a tree and sidewalk repair program that frankly has been opaque and seemingly arbitrary,” Matteo (R-Mid-Island) said in a statement. “The public has a right to know where and when these repairs are taking place, and that the City is properly managing our resources to reduce the risk of personal injury and property damage from falling branches, loose stumps or broken sidewalks…”

Kingston, New York, Daily Freeman, April 6, 2017: Village of Rhinebeck orders four trees taken down on private properties

The village has told the owners of four properties to have dying trees cut down — at their own expense. The trees, which village officials say are at risk of losing large branches, are at 32 Chestnut St., 46 Livingston St., 36 Mulberry St. and 47 Mulberry St. “They were brought to our attention by the Highway Department as safety hazards,” said village Tree Commission Chairwoman Meg Crawford. Crawford said woodpeckers have been “going after these trees … because they have a lot of insects inside them, which indicates rot inside the tree.” Members of the Village Board said Dave’s Tree Service has provided an estimate of $3,700 to take down all four trees but that it will be up to property owners to decide who does the work…

New York City, Wall Street Journal, April 4, 2017: ‘Pokémon Go’ suit makes case for virtual trespassing

Annoyed homeowners say “Pokémon Go” players have gone too far in their quest to master the smartphone game—and they want the company behind the hit application to be held responsible. A federal judge is poised to decide if a lawsuit alleging the game’s developer violated trespass and negligence laws can go forward, a ruling that could have broader implications for makers of games or other software that send users to specific locations. “Pokémon Go,” based on the Japanese franchise popularized by Nintendo Co. in the 1990s, sends millions of players each day searching for Pokémon characters on a digital map. Players gain points by catching the monsters, which appear superimposed into the real world through location-tracking technology and augmented reality. The court decision is expected in the coming weeks in a case brought by residents in New Jersey, Florida and Michigan. They say the popular game caused hordes of people to physically trespass on their land. They also say the game violates their rights by placing virtual game pieces on or near their private property without their permission…

UPI, April 6, 2017: Laser sensors spot trees with larch disease

Researchers are using laser sensors to locate trees threatened by deadly larch tree disease. Scientists at Leicester University partnered with aerial mapping company Bluesky to conduct a series of laser scanning surveys, or LiDAR surveys, in England and Scotland. Larch tree disease is caused by the fungus-like pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. The disease can affect a variety of tree and plant species. In Britain, the pathogen has proved particularly deadly to Japanese larch trees — hints the name. In the United States, particularly in Oregon and Washington, the disease is called sudden oak death, named for its most common victim. The pathogen was first identified in Britain in 2002 and has since infected several high-profile forests, including Epping Forest and the Forest of Dean…

Parsippany, New Jersey, Daily Record, April 5, 2017: Denville tree-farm harvest alarms neighbors

A rare harvest last week at a Denville tree farm alarmed some neighboring residents along Zeek Road, some fearing a developer had started to clear acreage for a construction project they had not been informed about. The culling, however, was a state-authorized selective harvest of oaks and poplars on the long-established, 22-acre farm-assessed property just south of Route 10, the existence of which some residents may have been unaware of, according to Denville Administrator Steven Ward. “We received numerous calls from concerned residents about trees being cut down there,” Ward said. “But that property is in fact assessed as a tree farm. Apparently there had not been a harvest there for several years, and some people were jumping to conclusions that they were putting up housing or something like that. That is simply not the case.” Ward and Tim Schrak, owner of Deer Spring Farm, differ on the details, but the harvest resumed on Monday, even as neighbors continued to speculate about possible development there on Facebook. Some claimed that 1,200 units of low-income housing were going in there, while others debated if the property was in Denville or Parsippany…

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Journal-Sentinel, April 5, 2017: Tree thief in Brookfield surrenders to police

A dozen arborvitae trees that separated two businesses in Brookfield disappeared several days ago and when police examined security video they saw two men had dug up the fragrant conifers in the dead of night before driving away. The tree heist happened around 2 a.m. on March 27 between Lee’s Dairy Treat, 14040 W. Greenfield Ave. and an acupuncture business. The thieves were careful to swivel a security camera away from the scene while they spent almost two hours uprooting 12 arborvitaes and two flowering trees and stacking them on a small trailer. But when one of the thieves pushed the security camera back to its original position he didn’t know about a second camera which recorded their actions as they drove away around 3:45 a.m. “It’s kind of an odd theft. I can’t tell you the last time landscape items were removed like this,” said City of Brookfield Police Capt. Tom Vento…

Bergen County, New Jersey, Record, April 5, 2017: Wyckoff adds penalties for tree removal violations

The Township Committee approved an ordinance Tuesday that encourages tree preservation during construction and imposes fines for violations. A second ordinance setting similar guidelines for trees in the area of a sewer project was sent to the Board of Health for review. Both ordinances set procedures to identify and preserve trees with diameters of six inches or greater. The guidelines adopted Tuesday would require submission of a landscaping plan showing “all existing and proposed trees and vegetation.” Preservation method details for all existing trees, such as protective fencing, would have to be shown on the plan. Soil cannot be stockpiled in a tree-protection zone. Protective barriers would have to be in place prior to the start of construction, and must be maintained throughout the project’s length…

Columbus, Georgia, Ledger-Enquirer, April 5, 2017: If a tree lands on your house, who pays for it?

The violent weather we’re seeing this week raises a question. If a tree falls and hits your house, are you covered by insurance? Most homeowner insurance policies are fairly straightforward, says the Insurance Information Institute (III). If a tree hits your house or other covered structure on your property, standard policies generally provide coverage for the damage the tree inflicts. It also is irrelevant whether or not you own the tree, the III says. If it hits your house, you can file a claim with your insurance company. Now, if the tree was on a neighbor’s property, your insurer may try to collect some damages from the neighbor’s insurance company, but that’s between them. This often happens if the neighbor’s tree was in poor health or poorly maintained…

San Luis Obispo, California, Tribune, April 4, 2017: Grover Beach puts Ramona Park tree back on the chopping block

It was a short-lived reprieve. A week after Grover Beach announced it would remove a 90-foot Monterey cypress tree from Ramona Garden Park and then just as quickly delayed that decision amid resident pushback, it looks like the tree will once again be on the chopping block at the end of the month. The Grover Beach City Council on Monday directed staff to tentatively go through with removing the tree, unless a second arborist’s review can prove the tree does not pose a public safety risk. “Look, public safety is our top priority,” Mayor John Shoals said. “We have an arborist saying this tree is diseased and poses a threat and risk. I could not live with myself if something happened to anyone that’s in that park, walking under that tree, who lives on that street. So we’re going to move forward with expediency.” An arborist hired by the city examined the tree in August and found signs of decay throughout the massive tree. According to the arborist’s report, the decay increases the risk of falling branches. Because of that, the arborist recommended removing the tree…

Dallas, Texas, News, April 4, 2017: 20-year-old electrocuted while trimming trees in Colleyville

A 20-year-old man died after reportedly being electrocuted while trimming trees in Colleyville on Monday afternoon. Luis Calderon of Carrollton died just after 5 p.m., according to the Tarrant County medical examiner. Calderon was harnessed in a tree to trim branches when the saw touched a power line, police told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He immediately lost consciousness, and other workers pulled him down as they called for help…

New York City, The Times, March 31, 2017: In Poland’s Crooked Forest, a mystery with no straight answer

In Poland’s Krzywy Las, or Crooked Forest, the pine trees look like potbellied stick figures. On some 400 trees, the trunks buckle out 90 degrees, creating bark-covered bellies that drag just above the earth, oddly, all pointing in the same direction — north. No one knows for certain what caused this unusual stand of trees in a protected forest, just outside the town of Gryfino, Poland. The town was mostly destroyed during World War II, and the truth of the forest was lost with it. Strangely bent trees exist in other parts of the world, but not in such great numbers nor as neatly arranged as in Poland’s Crooked Forest. You can visit this little patch of land in northwest Poland any time, but the cusp of spring is the perfect chance to see the trees in winter’s bare-boned attire, without its bitter temperatures…

The Atlantic, April 4, 2017: Trees have their own songs

Just as birders can identify birds by their melodious calls, David George Haskell can distinguish trees by their sounds. The task is especially easy when it rains, as it so often does in the Ecuadorian rainforest. Depending on the shapes and sizes of their leaves, the different plants react to falling drops by producing “a splatter of metallic sparks” or “a low, clean, woody thump” or “a speed-typist’s clatter.” Every species has its own song. Train your ears (and abandon the distracting echoes of a plastic rain jacket) and you can carry out a botanical census through sound alone. “I’ve taught ornithology to students for many years,” says Haskell, a natural history writer and professor of biology at Sewanee. “And I challenge my students: Okay, now that you’ve learned the songs of 100 birds, your task is to learn the sounds of 20 trees. Can you tell an oak from a maple by ear? I have them go out, pour their attention into their ears, and harvest sounds. It’s an almost meditative experience. And from that, you realize that trees sound different, and they have amazing sounds coming from them. Our unaided ears can hear how a maple tree changes its voice as a soft leaves of early spring change into the dying one of autumn…”

San Jose, California, Mercury News, April 3, 2017: PG&E tree pruning not as reckless as feared

Question: On my way home today, driving down Oak Grove Road, I was dismayed to see Davey tree service trucks and evidence of heavy tree pruning. I stopped and asked who had contracted the company, and was told it was PG&E. Who at PG&E would have authorized extensive tree pruning at this time of year? Winter is basically over, and we are now into the middle of nesting season. Could they not have done this much earlier in the year or later?

Answer: I was disheartened to hear about this, but what I found out might surprise and please you. It did me. I spoke with Tamar Sarkissian, spokeswoman for PG&E, who said a lot of thought and caution go into what the company calls its vegetation management. First of all, she says, all contractors receive annual training on how trees should be trimmed and what precautions to take. Before any tree is pruned, it is inspected for nests. If active nests are found, pruning is canceled immediately and rescheduled for the autumn, when nesting season ends…

Dallas, Texas, KXAS-TV, April 3, 2017: Neighbors in Lake Highlands help save a decades-old tree

A fight over a decades-old tree in a Dallas neighborhood leaves one man in handcuffs.The tree in the Lake Highlands area has long served as a photo opportunity for neighbors. “It provided this great horizontal bench that everyone sat on for pictures and the children climbed on it,” said Amy Martin, who lives in the area. On Thursday, neighbors said a man with a chainsaw began buzzing his way through the place that served as a playground for so many. Martin said neighbors confronted the man, 65-year-old Albert Santos, and told him to stop…

Wall Street Journal, April 3, 2017: Hey, You! Stop eating my yard!

In late April, Tim Marks’s 40 acres of Maine forest land faces an infestation: fiddlehead foragers. The retired state trooper spots dozens of them traipsing across his property, stuffing burlap sacks with the greens to sell at farmers markets. He has shooed them off, and even put up trail cameras. But they’ll go as far as to sneak back in at night, with headlamps. “I’m a victim of fiddlehead theft,” he sighed. “It’s ridiculous.” Such tensions are becoming more common in Maine, where the rise in popularity of wild vegetation like fiddleheads, ramps, mushrooms and seaweed for uses from gourmet cooking to nutritional supplements is causing friction between foragers and landowners. It is also threatening the state’s unusual and centuries-old tradition of allowing public access to private property…

Detroit, Michigan, Michigan Chronicle, April 3, 2017: Detroit to complete removal of 3,000 dead city-owned trees ahead of schedule

City crews will complete the first phase of an effort to remove 6,000 dead trees by the end of 2017. The second batch of 3,000 dead trees will begin coming down in July. City of Detroit General Services Department crews will remove the last of 3,000 dead trees located on city property they began removing last August. The work was not expected to be completed until early this summer, but is being finished ahead of schedule. Another 3,000 dead trees, also lost to disease and age, will begin coming down in July…

Dallas, Texas, Dallas News, April 2, 2017: A man tried to cut down a beloved tree in White Rock, but neighbors weren’t having it

Neighbors in the White Rock area of Dallas stepped in Thursday to stop a man who was spotted taking a chainsaw to a beloved tree. A woman passing by saw the man cutting up an old pecan tree in the 900 block of Peavy Road, near Lake Highlands Drive, and loading the wood into a trailer, according to a post from a neighbor on Nextdoor. The woman told him what he was doing was illegal and called the police. Seeing what was happening, a man used his car to block in the man’s pickup until the police came, the post said. The man reportedly told police that he had permission from the city to cut trees downed by the storm, but had no paperwork…

Denver, Colorado, KDVR-TV, April 2, 2017: Controversial tree in Longmont to get the ax on Monday

A controversial tree in Longmont is scheduled to be cut down on Monday. Homeowners planted the cottonwood in the city’s right-of-way back in 1977. They said when they bought it from a local nursery, it was a male and didn’t produce cotton. But over time it switched genders, as trees can do, and it now produces cotton. And it’s about 60-feet-tall. An effort by neighbors led the city to decide to cut it down. City leaders cited two ordinances that deal with nuisance trees and cotton-producing trees. But the homeowners, their children and a group of supporters fought to stop the city from cutting down the tree…

Colorado Spring, Colorado, Gazette, April 2, 2017: With more tree removal than ever in Colorado Springs, forester plays hero and villain

Amid the wreckage Dennis Will pleads his case. This is his doing: this forest that feels less like a forest, with paths lined by once proud trunks of ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. The hillsides used to be covered by oak brush. Now the chipped remnants are scattered about with green needles and broken branches. “This is ground zero of what folks don’t like,” says Will, the Colorado Springs forester examining the site of his latest dirty deed that he’d like people to know is necessary. He’s having to explain this project more than any of the others he’s overseen with the city. It is, after all, the largest tree removal project in Springs history, spanning 103 acres in Stratton Open Space. And some frequent hikers and bikers of this popular area don’t appreciate the facelift…

Minneapolis, Minnesota, Star Tribune, April 2, 2017: Birch tree bandits cut and run in Minnesota and Wisconsin

Thieves are illegally cutting down thousands of birch trees in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin to make a quick buck off city dwellers who love the paper-white logs, limbs and twigs in their home decor. The thefts have caught county sheriffs and state natural resource officials by surprise over the past few months, sending them scrambling to determine how big the problem is and how to keep it from getting worse. In the meantime, the thieves are leaving gaps in the northern landscape that will take at least a decade to refill with birch. Chief Deputy Mike Richter with the Washburn County Sheriff’s Office in Wisconsin was among those scratching their heads when word spread that swaths of birch saplings were being felled by crooks. “And then I learned some stuff about the market,” he said…

Phys.org, March 30, 2017: Researchers discover tree trunks act as methane source in upland forests

A new study from the University of Delaware is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas. Methane is about 25 times stronger than carbon dioxide, with some estimates as high as 33 times stronger due to its effects when it is in the atmosphere. Because of methane’s global warming potential, identifying the sources and “sinks” or storehouses of this greenhouse gas is critical for measuring and understanding its implications across ecosystems. Upland forest soils usually take up and store methane, but this effect can be counteracted by methane emissions from tree trunks, the research team from UD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources found. Their work is published in the scientific journal Ecosystems…

Jackson, Mississippi, WJTV, March 30, 2017: What makes a tree a threat during severe weather?

During severe storms, there’s a potential for trees and their limbs to fall. Brian Haley at Mid State Tree Service says you should keep an eye on trees, dead and alive. When pine trees die, the straw turns brown and bark falls off. Oaks often show their rot on the outside. Haley says some of these oaks along Highway 468 in Rankin County are dead or have dead limbs. He says oak roots are often shallow. “So when the ground is real wet they tend to get blown over,” He said. “They uproot real easy. Of course any tree dead is a threat at any time, much less in a storm…”

Oakland, California, Eastbay Times, March 30, 2017: Livermore tree saved: Neighbors get wish granted, but at what cost?

A 300-year-old oak tree will live to see another day. The Livermore Area and Recreation Park District agreed Wednesday to let the ailing tree at Sunset Park stand. But the decision comes with a sacrifice: The playground set under the tree will have to be removed, and will cost $1.2 million to relocate and replace. The valley oak may have had chainsaws in its future if it were not for some neighbors who caused a stir. When residents Nischal Belthangady, Terry McCune and others found out the park district was considering chopping down the tree, they organized a petition that gathered 500 signatures against the plan. “All of us have been eating, drinking and sleeping this oak for many months, so it’s nice to have it come to an end,” McCune said. “It is absolutely wonderful. They did the right thing…”

Bedlam Farm, March 30, 2017: Walk In The Woods: Trees Age And Die Gracefully

I walked in the deep woods this morning for the first time in months, there is still some snow up there. To mark the occasion – we love these woods (Petzval lens) I read a chapter from Peter Wohllenben’s wonderful book The Hidden Life Of Trees. Appropriately enough, I turned to chapter ll, Trees Age Gracefully. I can’t even count the number of truths about trees than I can relate to, I am a tree lover and a tree-hugger now. Wohllenben tell us that trees age like us, only at a different pace. As our hair thins, their crown thinks. They widen and add fat to help themselves against the cold. They get wrinkles, sometimes they are painful. Trees, he says, are not capable of maintaining their mature height for long because its energy levels diminish slowly over the years (a tree ages much more slowly than humans, many live for hundreds of years. At first, the tree can no longer manage to feed its topmost twigs, and these die off…

St. Paul, Minnesota, Pioneer Press, March 28, 2017: Hmong Village and an unlicensed tree trimmer are in hot water after 104 trees cut down in St. Paul

Unlicensed tree trimmers removing a grove for a parking lot expansion at the Hmong Village Shopping Center bit off more than they were allowed to chew in early March. A and A Tree Service advertised their services on metal stands and handed out brochures offering Hmong customers a 10 percent discount — and then removed 22 city-owned trees near Johnson Parkway that were not in their “scope of work” or project area, according to St. Paul city staff. On March 8, an inspector with the Department of Safety and Inspections ordered them to cease operations. “We told them they can’t operate in St. Paul,” said Robert Humphrey, a spokesman for the Department of Safety and Inspections. “We license tree trimmers, and there’s a good reason for that — to make sure they’re bonded and insured…”

Training Daily Advisor, March 29, 2017: Tree-trimming safety training

As spring blooms across the country, outdoor work becomes more common. Today, we consider how a tree-trimming accident led to a fatality and OSHA’s safety recommendations for tree-trimming activities. Several years ago, a 42-year-old employee of a real estate company was struck and killed by a large section of a 60-foot (ft)-tall eucalyptus tree he was helping to remove from the employer’s property. Cal/OSHA investigated the incident and found that neither he nor any of the other construction laborers employed by the company had the experience or training to safely cut down a tree of that size, leading to nearly $92,000 in fines for his employer. The company was cited with 13 violations, eight of which were classified as serious. According to Cal/OSHA, the company failed to employ a qualified tree worker, which is required by law to direct all work related to tree trimming, tree repair, or removal of trees exceeding 15 ft in height. In addition, workers were not trained to use the aerial lift that elevated them to cut the tree, and were not provided with eye protection or a fall protection harness while working on the lift. “Workers at construction sites are frequently exposed to serious hazards, and safety training is essential to prevent serious injuries and fatalities. This incident is a vivid reminder of what can go wrong when employers don’t have proper safety procedures in place,” said Christine Baker, director of California’s Department of Industrial Relations…

Dallas, Texas, WFAA-TV, March 29, 2017: Tree removal companies see surge after overnight storm in East Dallas

One of the hardest hit areas during overnight storms was near White Rock Lake in East Dallas. More than 80 mph winds were reported in that area. “That’s what woke me up,” said Kelly Secker, who said she and her husband heard a loud bang and jumped out of bed. “It was like an explosion sound,” she said. “I had no idea until we came up to the window.” Secker said she couldn’t believe it when she saw her neighbors tree on top of her house. “The bath and shower were destroyed and the rest of the tree came through the attic and punched holes,” she said. “My husband and I were up there with buckets trying to catch the rain…”

Columbus, Indiana, Republic, March 29, 2017: Pecan weevil affecting some residential trees in New Mexico

The state Department of Agriculture says a small number of residential pecan trees are being affected by pecan weevil in five eastern New Mexico cities. Pecan weevil is a significant insect pest of pecan and is not recognized as being established in New Mexico commercial orchards. Recently, pecan weevil has been identified in residential trees in Clovis, Roswell and Lovington. Additional pecan trees were identified with pecan weevil in Artesia and Hobbs. As a result, the agriculture department has extended the original 60-day quarantine, adding an additional 90 days…

Washington, D.C., Post, March 28, 2017: For tree lovers and woodworkers, there’s beauty in a burl

As you glance up into tree limbs, perhaps searching for some sign of spring in a swelling flower bud, your sight might be arrested by fat, rounded growths on the bark. On some trees, these hard, woody outgrowths — called burls — stand out on an otherwise clear trunk like a goiter. On other trees, the whole trunk might be covered with these masses. If you’ve never noticed these growths before, don’t be alarmed. They cause little or no harm to the tree. That said, burls might — just might — indicate that the tree has been under stress. All sorts of things have been implicated as the cause of burls. For instance, a burl could grow in response to a limb rubbing against the bark, to chewing by insects or some other physical injury. Perhaps the tree experienced or is experiencing some environmental stress — temperatures too cold or too hot, not enough food or not enough sunlight, for example…

Addison, Illinois, Daily Herald, March 28, 2017: One dead, one critical after hitting power lines in Addison

One man died and a second was seriously injured Tuesday morning after making contact with ComEd power lines while cutting limbs from a tree near Villa and Myrick avenues in Addison. Killed in the accident was Jose Fulgencio-Hueramo, 51, of Melrose Park.Authorities said Fulgencio-Hueramo was knocked off a ladder and fell to the ground. He was in cardiac arrest when authorities arrived. He was taken to the emergency room at Adventist GlenOaks Hospital in Glendale Heights where he was pronounced dead at 11:48 a.m., the DuPage County coroner’s office said…

Santa Monica, California, Observer, March 28, 2017: If An old growth redwood tree falls in Santa Monica, does anyone hear it?

As Ecclesiastes said, there is a time for everything under heaven; a time to be born and a time to die. An old growth Redwood tree finally had to be taken down on 9th street. It had died during the drought, 18 or so months ago, and had become a hazard to the neighborhood. The City of Santa Monica, which has an active tree removal department called “Community forestry,” red tagged the tree on October 7, 2016. Several residents appealed the decision. On October 31st, we called the community forester’s office. Peter Provenzale, Urban Forest Supervisor, City of Santa Monica told us “We received another appeal last week as well. The adoration of the neighbors and the charm of the tree, the urban forestry division has decided to leave the redwood standing at this time. The tree is in decline and has significant dieback. We will re-inspect the tree in March 2017. At that point we will reassess the health and its overall vigor.” On March 28, 2017, on a day of high winds, a private crew came to take the tree down. The redwood was undeniably brown, a victim of the drought…

Gwinnett, Georgia, Daily Post, March 28, 2017: Dealing with storm damaged trees

Recently, there have been many news reports about trees causing damage to property as of the result of storms. They have brought down power lines, damaged vehicles, closed roads and even caused a few fatalities. The excessive rains of the past few weeks have saturated the soil increasing the susceptibility of the trees being damaged by high winds. The high-stress levels they have been under in recent years as a result of the prolonged drought, construction activities, and pest infestations have increased the chances of trees suffering damage. What should you do if you have trees damaged and blown down as a result of the storms? First and foremost, take the necessary safety precautions. Storm damaged trees can present dangers to homeowners. The trees could be in contact with electrical wires. Anyone touching the tree could be electrocuted. Contact your local power provider so they can assess the situation. Trees that are down or partially blown over can quickly shift position due to the uneven weight distribution. Avoid climbing on the tree or pulling on any limbs. You may be tempted to begin removing the damaged tree yourself. However, doing so can lead to serious injury or death. If large sections of the tree are broken or hanging, or if the work will require the use of a ladder or chainsaw overhead, then a certified arborist should be consulted…

Salem, Massachusetts, News, March 27, 2017: Danvers condo owners take stand against tree clearing

A group of owners at the Royal Park Condominiums at 147 Sylvan St. are taking a stand after a contractor for the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company cut down at least seven trees at the front of their building to clear the right-of-way of an existing high-pressure natural gas pipeline. The residents were so upset about what happened last Tuesday that on Wednesday morning, around 6 a.m., they used their vehicles to block the driveway to keep out work crews. “They came in and in the first hour, they took down seven trees,” said Jennifer Fraser, one of the three trustees for the condominium association. On Tuesday, she said, the company cut down mature maple and pine trees and a cherry blossom tree. “It looks like a war zone,” Fraser said. She said the company plans to remove another 25 trees along the pipeline easement, which runs roughly parallel to the front of the long, two-story, 49-unit condominium building that dates to 1975. This area includes a wooded turnaround with parking spaces…

Hartford, Connecticut, Courant, March 27, 2017: Canterbury man killed in tree-cutting accident

A 32-year-old man cutting down a tree was killed when it fell on him Saturday afternoon, police said. Matthew Veloce was using a chainsaw to cut down a tree outside his home on Goodwin Road 2 when the accident happened, Sgt. Eric Haglund reported. Veloce was alone at the time. His wife found him trapped under the tree and called for help, police said. Quinnebaug Valley Emergency Communications got a report of a serious accident at 3:59 p.m. and dispatched an ambulance and firefighters. They sent a radio message at 4:13 that they’d freed the victim, but 11 minutes later reported that he had been pronounced dead…

Newburyport, Massachusetts, News, March 27, 2017: Tree Talk: Restoring the canopy, one tree at a time

Spring is here! Although we lost many trees to disease, old age and nor’easters this winter, they are slowly but surely being replaced, thanks to generous contributions and increased funding to the Tree Commission budget. You’ll soon see Jim McCarthy of Saltbox Financials on the corner of Route 1 and Pond Street planting two October Glory maples. Five Cents Savings Bank on State Street will have a new honey locust. Four more cherry trees will suddenly appear magically, planted by little elves (Friends of Newburyport Trees and Tree Commission volunteers) at Bartlet Mall and a copper beech will provide a shady spot for sitting by the Frog Pond where the old willow once stood. Twenty new trees are projected to be planted on High Street between Atkinson Common and the Newbury line, 19 more in spring 2018. Seventy more sites have been selected to complete the gateway project on High Street within five years. And finally, coming this spring to Fair, Kent, Merrill, Forrester, the corner of Washington and Olive streets are 14 different varieties of cherry, maple, gingko, elm, hornbeam, oak, honey locust and Ivory Silk lilac trees. For each new tree planted, the Tree Commission must budget $250 for its purchase, $150 for planting and $240 for a 2-year service provided by a watering contractor every week from May 15 through Sept. 15. Friends of Battis Grove, the Newburyport Horticultural Society and the Newburyport Garden Club have also gifted money to FoNT to help make this possible. At its March meeting, the Budget and Finance Committee of the City Council approved $10,000 free cash to go toward the purchase of more street trees. The Tree Commission has requested an increase for the FY 2018 tree budget to $20,000, up from $15,000. Without these increases, all or at least part of the spring and fall 2018 neighborhood planting programs would have to be suspended…

Seattle, Washington, Times, March 27, 2017: D.C.’s cherry trees reached peak bloom, parks service says

The National Park Service says Washington’s famous cherry trees reached peak bloom over the weekend. The National Park Service says on its website that peak bloom was reached Saturday. This year’s bloom was different from in the past because cold weather killed half of the blossoms on the famous trees just as they were reaching peak bloom. Peak bloom is normally defined as the day when 70 percent of the blossoms are open on the Yoshino cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. But that didn’t happen this year because half of those blossoms were killed as a result of the cold. Officials defined peak bloom as the day 70 percent of the remaining blossoms were open…

Paonia, Colorado, High Country News, March 20, 2017: Busting the tree ring

The clearing that tree poachers call the Slaughterhouse lies in the northwest corner of Washington’s Gifford Pinchot National Forest, concealed behind the wall of hemlock and cedar that edges Forest Road 25. Ron Malamphy first visited the Slaughterhouse on a damp day near the end of winter in 2012. When he pushed into the glade, he found the scene matched the moniker. A jumble of felled bigleaf maple, chain-sawed into rough chunks, littered the forest floor, heartwood exposed to the chilly air. The most valuable wedges had been crudely hacked out, the rest left to rot. A patina of sawdust coated the moss and ferns. It looked, a federal prosecutor would say later, like a bomb had gone off. Cutting bigleaf maple is generally legal, with the right permits, on private and state land in Washington. In national forests, however, protections on old growth keep the tree strictly off-limits. But in Gifford Pinchot, the law’s arm didn’t reach too far…

Washington, D.C., The Daily Caller, March 26, 2017: Tree huggers at $63,550-per-year college SHOCKED to learn they can be punished for breaking rules

Swarthmore College — a fancypants, politically-correct hothouse bursting at the seams with wealthy white kids — has announced that it may punish five students for their role in a four-hour takeover of an administrative office last month. The students facing the prospect of punishment for breaking school rules have reacted with disappointment and confusion.The demonstrating students are part of Swarthmore’s Mountain Justice group, a campus organization which is perpetually demanding that Swarthmore’s trustees sell all the fossil-fuel stocks in the school’s luxurious $1.9 billion endowment portfolio…

Columbus, Georgia, Ledger-Enquirer, March 26, 2017: Not as simple as, ‘Hey, cut this tree down’

“The tree gives shade even to him who cuts off its boughs.” ― Sri Chaitanya, spiritual leader, circa 1500. I hope Sri’s right, because we’ve been cutting some boughs lately and are apt to be cutting more before it’s over. We wrote last week about a potentially dangerous situation on the back side of the tennis center at Cooper Creek Park. (More on that later.) The column got the attention of Concerned Reader Michael, who is alarmed about the condition of some trees along Lynch road between the Bull Creek Golf Course entrance and Matthew’s Elementary School down the road. “The trees along Bull Creek Golf Course, going along Lynch Road, all the way to Mathews Elementary, are some of the most dangerous looking trees in town,” Michael wrote. “Not sure if the golf course or the city is responsible/liable when something bad happens, but something must be done...”

Websnep.com, March 27, 2017: Questions Answered About Tree Cutting Services In Bronx, NY For Dangerous Trees

Individuals often plant trees close to their house because of the shade they provide. In addition to relaxing underneath a shade tree on a hot summer day, the leaves on a tree also provide shade for the house, and this makes it cooler inside. When trees that are growing close to the house become dangerous, it’s time to contact professional tree cutting services in Bronx NY. Trees that are in close proximity to a house can fall on the structure if they’re hit by lightning or damaged by high winds. If branches on the tree are unhealthy and die, they can also fall on the house and cause damage to the roof. If a limb falls straight down with enough force, it can penetrate the roofing materials and cause a hole in the roof. If a tree becomes damaged, homeowners should have it cut down by professionals before it falls…

Denver, Colorado, KUSA-TV, March 22, 2017: Judge gives green light to cut down controversial Longmont tree

A Boulder District Court judge ruled against a Longmont family trying to save the cottonwood tree in front of their home. The family said the shade from the tree was the only thing keeping their house cool because they can’t afford air conditioning. The city said the tree is on city property and it planned to cut it down after complaints for decades from neighbors regarding people’s health and other hazards.The tree was planted by Kent and Patty McDonald 38 years ago in honor of their three daughters.”This re presents family to her,” Quinn Finn, one of the McDonalds’ daughters, said…

Mahwah, New Jersey, Patch, March 22, 2017: 100-Foot Tree Falls On Car In Mahwah, Critically Injures Oakland Woman: Police

A 26-year-old woman was critically injured when a 100-foot-tall tree fell on her car on Ramapo Valley Road, police said. Officers provided first aid to the Oakland resident, who suffered “critical injuries” on her face and internally, said Police Chief James N. Batelli. The crash occurred near 888 Ramapo Valley Road and the woman was reportedly going south when the Hyundai Elantra was struck. Wind gusts were about 35 to 40 mph when the tree fell, Batelli said. The Mahwah Volunteer Ambulance Corps and paramedics from Valley Hospital took the woman to Hackensack University Medical Center…

Hartford, Connecticut, Courant, Match 22, 2017: Tree limb falls on school bus, killing driver

A school bus driver died Wednesday when a large tree limb fell on his school bus, causing him to crash, police said. No students were on board. The freak accident happened on Country Club Road near Tamara Circle in Avon about 8:50 a.m. as the driver was returning to the bus depot. It was a windy morning, and a large tree branch apparently fell on the roof over the cab of the bus, police said. The male driver lost control, and the bus struck a utility pole. He was only a short distance from the depot at the time of the accident, Lt. John Schmalberger said…

Tallahassee, Florida, WCTV, March 22, 2017: City moves for Urban Forest Master Plan, more work on tree removal program

The Tallahassee City Commission held a workshop Wednesday to discuss an Urban Forest Master Plan. This, after the Commission moved to develop a UFMP at its annual retreat in January. The idea is to create a plan for the City’s urban forest that tailors to the needs of the community. The urban forest is any and all trees and vegetation on public and private land within city boundaries. An Urban Forest Master Plan considers the current state, how the public feels, what they want from the trees and how to manage them internally; plus, it develops a path forward for achieving goals. To create this, staff recommended the Commission do four things. The first is to issue an RFP for a consultant to perform an Urban Tree Canopy Analysis, as well as direct a public engagement program. Secondly, to modify some of the policies regarding the electric utility tree trimming program. Third, to create a Storm Preparedness Pilot Program, which would offer loans to residents for tree removal of specific tree. And finally, to consider underground utility conversion in specific areas of the city…

Voice of America, March 21, 2017: Put rainfall, air conditioning back into trees, scientists say

International climate and environment agreements have a flaw which may jeopardize attempts to curb global warming quickly: they do not highlight the role trees play in creating rainfall and cooling the earth’s surface, 22 scientists said on Tuesday. Traditionally, international agreements have focused on how trees affect carbon levels in the atmosphere — living trees absorb carbon dioxide and deforestation releases carbon. While that is important, it should not be the priority, the scientists said, while presenting results of their research at a virtual forestry symposium…

Davenport, Iowa, KWQC-TV, March 21, 2017: Allergists see cases of tree pollen allergies to the QCA early this year

“It’s starting to get warm, there’s no more snow, hopefully there won’t be more snow,” Gilbert Sierra said. That warmer weather has Sierra and his son, GG Sierra out enjoying the first couple days of spring. “Just enjoying the weather, just you know going bike riding, going running, you know hopefully it’ll get a lot more warmer and then we can do more things outside you know,” Gilbert Sierra said. For GG, though, springtime brings seasonal allergies. “Just like a runny nose every once in a while and having to wipe it constantly,” GG Sierra said…

Science World Report, March 21, 2017: Microfluidic chip: Researchers present new ‘Tree-On-A-Chip,’ mimics pumping mechanism of trees & plants

Trees and plants have their own hydraulic pump system through that water travels up to the leaves from the roots and the sugar and the nutrients that the leaves produce travel down to the roots. The pumping mechanism is carried out through a system of tissues called xylem and phloem. Mimicking the pumping mechanism inside trees and plants, a group of MIT engineers have designed a microfluidic chip that they have termed as “tree-on-a-chip.” The newly designed chip works almost the same as the natural pumps inside trees and does not require any external pump or mechanical part, reported Phys.org. The microfluidic chip is able to move fluids through the chip at a steady flow rate for several days. Notably, researchers had developed the same tree-inspired pump systems before. However, they found that the designs would stop pumping within just a few minutes. In order to make the chip, the researchers put together two plastic slides and drilled small channels through the slides to represent xylem and phloem. They filled water in the xylem channel and water and sugar in the phloem channel. Next, they used a semipermeable material to separate the two slides to mimic the membrane between xylem and phloem, as noted by MIT News…

Los Angeles, California, Daily News, March 21, 2017: Gardening: Don’t expect many plants, trees to be low-maintenance

It’s a testimony to how tricky it is to grow plants in a doctor’s office that you hardly ever see them there. In fact, I cannot remember the last time I saw plants in a doctor’s office. Decades ago, when Bombeck, who authored a widely syndicated, humorous column on daily living, had her say on this subject, it provided a good laugh. At the same time (remember: in those days, most people read newspapers!), it had a chilling effect on growing greenery in health-care environments. Despite there being a boatload of literature on how beneficial it is, health-wise, to be surrounded by oxygenating and pollutant filtering indoor plants, hospital rooms and doctor offices have largely become greenery-free zones. While doctors can be excused for not wanting to fuss with plant care, what about us? These days, the most eye-catching words you can use to promote any plant species are “low maintenance.” Let’s be clear, however, that despite my own, all too frequent verbal obeisance to this imaginary concept, there is really no such thing as a low-maintenance plant — at least not in an urban environment…

Portland, Maine, Press Herald, March 20, 2017: State: Tree-cutting to aid Maine wildlife area going well, may be ahead of schedule

A controversial timber harvesting project at a popular central Maine wildlife area is likely ahead of schedule, with more work planned for this summer. The project at the roughly 1,000-acre Jamies Pond Wildlife Management Area in Hallowell, Manchester and Farmingdale began in August and is roughly 75 percent complete, an official with the Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife said during a Hallowell Conservation Commission meeting. It’s the first timber harvesting project at Jamies Pond in more than a decade. “We’ve had really good operating conditions, and we haven’t had significant challenges because we had a very dry fall,” said G. Keel Kemper, a regional wildlife biologist for the wildlife agency, which is overseeing the project. “We feel pretty good about it.” The timber harvesting effort includes the removal of certain trees to allow other, younger trees to flourish, thus increasing foraging opportunities for deer, snowshoe hare and turkey. In addition, work is designed to improve a deer wintering area to increase openings in aspen-dominated sections to provide habitat for grouse and woodcock. The agency also built roads for vehicles and equipment. The roads are for temporary use but are essentially permanent by footprint…

Greenville, North Carolina, WHNS-TV, March 20, 2017: New tree initiative launched in Asheville

Asheville’s Parks & Recreation Department, along with Asheville GreenWorks, has launched a new initiative to plant trees over the course of the next three years at the city’s 74 recreation facilities. According to the City, to start off the initiative, the department announced the “30 Trees in 30 Days” program. Members of the Parks & Recreation Department, volunteers with Asheville GreenWorks and community members will gather at 4 p.m. on Mar. 8 at the Shiloh Complex to plant the first three trees. “Through this three-year tree initiative, the Parks and Recreation Department demonstrates its commitment to improving the appearance of our community and our environment. Planting these trees at our parks and facilities creates a lasting legacy.” Said Roderick Simmons, Parks & Recreation Director. In Jan. 2016, the Asheville City Council created a 20-year vision for the city. Part of this vision included a dedication to a clean and healthy environment…

Mother Nature Network, March 20, 2017: Why do the leaves of some trees turn brown but not drop?

Have you noticed a tree around town that holds its brown leaves all winter instead of dropping them? There’s a term for this curious leaf-retention phenomenon. It’s called marcescence. And if it’s a conical-shaped understory tree with bleached, light tan leaves, it’s probably an American beech (Fagus grandiflora). “Basically, that means that things hold onto stuff,” said Jim Finley, a Pennsylvania Extension Service forester who is also a professor of forest resources and director of the Center for Private Forests at Penn State. Marcescence occurs in other trees beyond beech trees. Leaf retention also occurs in many oak species, witch hazel, hornbeam (musclewood) and hophornbeam (ironwood), said Finley, who added that it’s more common with smaller trees, or more apparent on the lower branches of larger trees. What’s interesting is that scientists haven’t figured out exactly why some trees retain their leaves. “It’s all speculation,” sad Finley, who said there appears to be little new literature about the topic in recent years…

Pensacola, Florida, News Journal, March 20, 2017: Learn the tools, techniques to keep your trees handsome

Keep your trees and shrubs happy, healthy and handsome with the tips and techniques you’ll learn at a proper-pruning instructional session, 10 a.m. Monday at Pensacola State College, Milton campus. Florida Master Gardener Mike Burba will lead the one-hour presentation of the proper techniques for pruning of trees and shrubs, including the use of the right tools. If weather allows, a demonstration will take place in the garden. The presentation is part of the “Mondays in the Gardens” series, a free gardening program at the UF Milton Gardens under the direction of UF/IFAS Extension Santa Rosa County Master Gardeners. No pre-registration is required. Follow the signs on the Pensacola State College, Milton campus to find the UF Milton Gardens. The gardens are free and open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day the campus is open. Both self-guided and guided tours are available. Changing seasonal gardens feature a multitude of horticultural displays including shade, formal, children’s and water gardens, bulbs, roses, shrubs, trees and perennials…

San Francisco, California, Chronicle, March 18, 2017: First major SF tree census: 35,000 more trees in city than previously thought

Urban tree huggers rejoice. This concrete jungle is home to nearly 125,000 trees and a staggering 628 species and cultivars. San Francisco’s tree population is even more diverse than its citizenry. Following a yearlong citywide tree inventory, officials with the SF Urban Forest Map painstakingly recorded every tree in San Francisco. The map was last updated in 2010, using data primarily from the Department of Public Works. Combining data from the Friends of the Urban Forest, the City of San Francisco, businesses, and citizen scientists, this year’s update reported 35,000 more trees than the previous iteration. A typical city hosts 80-100 different tree species, according to a statement on the Urban Forest Map’s website. San Francisco’s diversity of species aids the plants in warding off pests and diseases, and the data helps forest managers plan future tree plantings…

Baraboo, Wisconsin, News, March 19, 2017: Program to discuss tree fire scars

The Baraboo Range Preservation Association will hold the Cabin Fever Lecture Series program, Fire on the Landscape: Historical Evidence at Pine Bluff from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday at the University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County science facility, 1006 Connie Road, Baraboo. Wisconsin DNR Fire Ecologist, Jed Meunier will discuss fire scars found in tree stumps at BRPA conservation easement property owned by Toni Ankenbrandt. Learn about the frequency of fire from this red pine relic as part of the larger historical record for the Baraboo Hills. Cross sections of stumps collected on location will be on display…

Carlisle, Pennsylvania, The Sentinel, March 19, 2017: Winter storm stalls bud growth in fruit trees

The winter storm had arrived just when David Peters needed a change in the business climate. Warm temperatures this winter forced him to keep a close eye on the fruit trees that make up his livelihood. The concern was the warmer temperatures could fool the trees into coming out of dormancy too early, putting the blossoms that bear the fruit at risk of being damaged by a subsequent dip in the mercury. “It came at a very good time for us,” said Peters, manager and part-owner of Peters Orchards of Adams County, which has a few hundred acres along the border with South Middleton Township in Cumberland County. The cold temperatures and heavy snow that came with the storm delayed any further development of buds on most of the fruit trees, putting the plants back on a normal seasonal pattern…

US News, March 19, 2017: Changing climate threatens New Mexico’s pinon trees

New Mexico’s official state tree is under threat from the region’s warming and drying climate, scientists say. The pinon pine is known for its nuts and its distinctive smell when used as firewood. But state scientists and botanists are warning that pinon trees across northern New Mexico and other areas of the state may be under increasing strain this year, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports. The changing climate can leave the tree vulnerable to pest infestation and disease, and it isn’t clear yet how severe the problem could become, according to scientists. “Pine needle scale is all over Santa Fe,” said Scott Canning, director of horticulture for the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. “Last year, it was widespread; this year it is even more widespread…”

Ruidoso, New Mexico, News, March 15, 2017: First-graders beg principal to save lone apple tree

We’re a long way from the picking season, but the lone apple tree next to the White Mountain Elementary school cafeteria driveway is producing some very rich fruit right now anyway. First graders at nearby Sierra Vista Primary school learned that because of its location, the tree might be doomed when the backhoes arrive next month to begin construction of the Nob Hill replacement project. The students took pens in hand last week to compose a petition to Principal Jeremy Green, explaining how important the tree is and asking him to find a way to save it. “I did have the class write me a nice letter talking about their concern with the tree,” Green said Wednesday. “It’s a sort of cornerstone for them. They talked about the apples and the shade it provides…”

Atlanta, Georgia Journal-Constitution, March 15, 2017: Cops: Man scammed Gwinnett seniors with fake tree-cutting business

Gwinnett County cops are looking for a Flowery Branch man they believe has scammed 14 people out of $9,000 with a fake tree-cutting business. Andrew Mosley, 22, is wanted on 13 counts of misdemeanor theft by conversion and one count of felony theft by conversion. Mosley posed as a tree-cutting and removal service provider in Gwinnett County starting in December, taking advance payment to trim or remove trees, but not completing jobs. Several of Mosley’s alleged victims are elderly, in their 70s and 80s, police said. Mosely is believed to have operated under the company names of B&M Tree Services, Mosley Tree Service and United Tree Service.“We highly anticipate additional victims,” police said. Customers can avoid potential scammers by checking whether a company is registered with the Secretary of State’s office or asking for proof of insurance…

Oakland, Michigan, Press, March 15, 2017: There is no cure for black knot fungus on your tree

Q: I just love those purple leaf plum trees. I have one now and it appears to have tumors on the branches. It has black corky material on various branches that make them lumpy and I have no idea when this happened. And there has never been any fruit on this tree but it has had flowers. So, what’s happening?
A: A fungal problem called black knot is happening. This is a chronic problem with many members of the prunus family, especially purple leaf plum or sand cherry. It is known by both names. The branches develop black galls that cut off the flow of nutrients to the branches. But this nonsense did not occur recently. It takes at least two years to develop the blackened, swollen growths. The first year, they are small, light brown, smooth swellings on twigs. These develop on the current or last year’s growth. The next year during the growing season, the lumps become olive green and velvety in appearance. Then, they turn black and corky by the end of the growing season. The twigs could become curved or elbowed by the strange growths…

Lynchburg, Virginia, News & Advance, March 15, 2017: For love of nature: Preserving urban tree canopies

Most of us appreciate the beauty of tree-lined streets and the shade they give on hot summer days. Trees, however, provide many more benefits we often fail to recognize, including filtering pollutants out of the air and water, absorbing stormwater, improving mental and physical health, and increasing tax revenue and property values. The importance of tree canopies to urban revitalization was the focus of a workshop in Roanoke last week by Trees Virginia, the Virginia Urban Forest Council, a nonprofit organization that works to improve quality of life through tree stewardship. Speaker Karen Firehock, executive director of the Green Infrastructure Center in Charlottesville, said trees can reduce urban runoff between 2 and 7 percent, noting developers should not rip out trees to install rain gardens…

San Antonio, Texas, KSAT-TV, March 14, 2017: Tree recovery initiative kicks off for people impacted by storms

It’s about to get a lot more green in the neighborhoods impacted by the serious storms and tornadoes a little more than three weeks ago. On Tuesday, employees from the city of San Antonio’s Parks and Recreation Department began implementing a tree recovery initiative. “We lost all of our trees,” said Jesse Solano, a Linda Drive resident. Solano has lived on Linda Drive for 12 years. He and his family are expecting a higher utility bill when they move back home. That’s because big, beautiful shade trees that once stood in their front and back yards are now gone, lost to the EF-2 tornado that ripped down the street. Thanks to tree mitigation funds from the city, and some helpful Parks and Recreation employees, Solano and others affected by the storms were able to pick out two trees of their choice to plant at home free of charge. The initiative will also plant large trees at eligible homes. “We hope and pray that with nurturing, they’re going to grow up real nice and pretty,” Solano said…

Davenport, Iowa, Quad City Times, March 14, 2017: Davenport ash tree removals more than tripled since 2015

Davenport arborist Chris Johnson’s eyes widened, and he had to take a step back as he tried to explain the effect of the emerald ash borer to members of the Davenport City Council. The tiny, green invasive species originating from Asia was discovered in Rock Island County in 2013, but it was suspected to have been in the area for six to seven years prior. Two years later, it surfaced in Davenport. Now, the ash borer is damaging trees at an alarming rate with removal of hazardous and unhealthy ash trees more than tripling since its discovery in Davenport. “Once the infestations kind of bloom and explode, you find it all the time,” Johnson said. “That’s the case that’s going on now with all of our ash removal. We’re essentially finding it in every ash tree we remove…”

Environment Guru, March 14, 2017: Five years of tree mortality: PG&E continues work to keep lines clear, lessen wildfire threat

You don’t have to travel far into the Sierra Nevada foothills to see the devastation. In California, 6.1 million trees died per month between October 2015 and November 2016, bringing the total to 102 million since 2010 from more than five years of drought and bark beetle infestation. As a result of PG&E patrols, the energy company removed 236,000 dead or dying trees last year. Since California’s tree mortality crisis began, PG&E has worked to protect its infrastructure, and the customers and communities it serves, from wildfires and other public safety threats. Last week (March 8), PG&E representatives appeared before the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection to discuss how the energy company has been combating the threat. That includes additional, extraordinary measures to its regular tree maintenance program that prunes or removes about 1.2 million trees each year, said Kamran Rasheed, PG&E vegetation management manager…

Lafayette, Louisiana, KATC-TV, March 14, 2017: Sunny, cool with a good chance of tree pollen

It’s that time of year again in Acadiana…pleasant weather with the main chance of something falling from the sky, or the trees rather, is pollen. That’s what the forecast holds for Acadiana as trees continue to reveal there spring foliage while rain chances are expected to remain slim to none at least over the next week. According to pollen.com oak and ash pollen are the currently the top allergens in the area…with the forecast for high tree pollen to continue for the rest of the week. Expect sunny skies to continue for our Wednesday with temperatures warming into the low-mid 60s after a chilly start mostly in the lower 40s…

Dallas, Texas, Morning News, March 13, 2017: 67-year-old Lakewood woman climbs tree to protest Oncor’s pruning

A 67-year-old woman climbed a tree outside her Lakewood home on Monday morning in an effort to keep it from being cut down. Jeri Huber went up the tree around 11 a.m., KXAS-TV (NBC5) reported, and only came down when she learned that workers would come back with a restraining order against her. Huber told the station that the incident in the 7100 block of Westlake Avenue, near Winsted Drive, stemmed from a dispute with Oncor about a pole that had been left leaning onto her property. A Dallas County constable served papers at Huber’s home Monday afternoon, WFAA-TV (Channel 8) reported, and the tree-trimming crew returned. In 2010 — armed with a pellet gun — she climbed a tree in an attempt to stop the company’s crews from trimming its branches. Oncor eventually got a restraining order against her.…

Anderson, Indiana, Independent Mail, March 13, 2017: Tree removal closes Anderson’s South Boulevard

The removal of a 105-year-old tree that likely had been part of the Anderson University landscape at its inception is expected to block traffic on South Boulevard for parts of the next three days. Traffic was blocked most of the day Monday as cranes moved into position for the removal. The road will be blocked in front of Anderson University again from 8 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Wednesday. Arbortech crews began work Monday morning on the removal of a large red oak tree that stood near the road. Arborist Phil Pierce said the 120-foot tree was likely a young one in the spring of 1912, a few months before the college opened its doors for the first time…

Villanova, Pennsylvania, Main Line Media News, March 13, 2017: White oak tree trunk installed to await new bunny sculpture

The carved wooden rabbits statue that has been a landmark along County Line at Spring Mill roads in Villanova was removed two weeks ago as crews delicately disassembled the roadside attraction to make room for a new one that will be carved in the in the next month or so. The statue was carved decades ago and was beginning to deteriorate, so officials and crews from the Natural Lands Trust, which now owns the Stoneleigh estate property where the rabbits stood, decided to have Marty Long, the man who originally carved it, make a new one. Last Saturday, the decayed base was replaced by a new white oak tree trunk installed by crews from Shreiner Tree Care. The 4,500-pound decayed trunk was removed by crane, and carefully replaced with the 26,000 pound white oak trunk. Long, will recreate another bunny sculpture over the next couple of weeks…

Labroots, March 13, 2017: Tree rings predicting volcanic eruptions?

Geographers and dendrochronologists teamed up in a cross-disciplinary study to look at the correlation between tree rings and volcanic eruptions, reports the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL and the ETH Zurich. Their results gathered from Mount Etna’s west flank which erupted in January, 1974, state evidence that tree rings may be able to predict eruptions. Scientists know that tree rings can provide a lot of of environmental information. For instance, the ring width reflects the tree’s growth conditions, which are a combination of the temperature, precipitation and nutrient conditions during a given growing season, explains ScienceDaily. But this new study, published in Scientific Reports, makes it clear that tree rings may provide even more information than previously thought. “The ring width may also be influenced by volcanic activity on Mount Etna and in other volcanic regions,” states geographer Ruedi Seiler, a PhD student at WSL…

Seattle, Washington, KCPQ, March 12, 2017: ‘I was in shock’ friends of teen killed by falling tree concerned over park safety

Family and friends are grieving the loss of 17-year-old Diana Olidinchuk who died in after a tree fell on her in one of their local parks. It has some concerned about the safety of the trees in Meadowdale Beach Park where a makeshift memorial for the teen is at the hike’s entrance. “I was at work yesterday and my friend called me and I was in shock,” said Angelina Plutenko. She came to the memorial with her sister Evelina the day after she learned about her friend. “I was in shock for the whole day…”

Lincoln, Nebraska, Journal Star, March 12, 2017: March is a great time for tree pruning

Late winter is an excellent time to prune deciduous trees. Branches are easier to remove when not weighed down by leaves and the tree’s branching structure is easier to see. Proper tree pruning is essential in developing trees with strong structures and desirable form. Young trees that receive appropriate pruning require little corrective pruning as they mature. Pruning can be done at any time during the year, but growth is maximized and wound closure is fastest if it takes place just before spring growth. However, flowering trees, like Japanese lilac and magnolia, should be pruned right after they finish blooming to prevent the removal of flower buds during pruning. Pruning should be done with an understanding of how trees respond to each cut. Improper pruning can cause damage that will last for the life of the tree, or worse, shorten the tree’s life

San Diego, California, Reader, March 12, 2017: Encinitas’ love/hate for a certain tree

An attempt to pass a tree ordinance in Encinitas drew a slew of people to a meeting Wednesday night (March 8). Besides being generally interested in protecting publicly owned trees, people wanted to talk about the four ficus trees the city planned to cut down last year. The city aborted the plan amid public protest and is now trying to control the trees’ growth so their roots stop damaging streets, sidewalks, and sewer connections. The proposed ordinance is more broad and general, allowing the city to declare trees “heritage trees,” which triggers greater protections for them. The ordinance only applies to city-owned trees, not to private property. The city already has a tree ordinance (approved in 2011) and was recognized as a “Tree City” in 2012. But the “safety net” for trees has failed several times since then, and the city is exploring hiring a contract arborist as its tree expert…

Redlands, California, Daily Facts, March 12, 2017: Why crews are relocating 4 palm trees in downtown Redlands

City crews this week will replant four palm trees downtown. The crews removed the palms from the sidewalk along the east side of Orange Street north of Redlands Boulevard to relieve crowding of the trees against storefronts and create a wider walkway for pedestrians. The palms are currently being stored and watered in anticipation of replanting. Two palms will be relocated to vacant tree wells in the sidewalk in front of the Redlands Mall. The other two trees will be relocated into newly constructed bulb-out tree wells near their current location along Orange Street

Dallas, Texas, WFAA-TV, March 9, 2017: Neighbors take a stand against Oncor crews cutting down trees

Most mornings Juanita Erwin makes a cup of coffee and looks out at her oak tree in the front yard of her Weatherford home. She’s been doing the same morning routine for 30 years. “My husband planted the tree himself. Grew it from an acorn,” Erwin said. Thursday, helicopters flew over as Erwin’s neighbors stood in front of that tree, blocking crews from Oncor from cutting it down. “We told them they had to leave and get a permit,” Arthur Erwin said, Juanita’s husband. Oncor says it was doing “vegetation management” clearing trees and plants that pose a risk to the vital electric infrastructure.” In a written statement from the power company, Oncor says it chose trees and plants based on their height and proximity to the high voltage lines…

Longview, Washington, The Daily News, March 9, 2017: Kalama man killed by falling tree while clearing his property

A 36-year-old man clearing land on his own property east of Kalama died Tuesday morning after a tree fell on him. Stewart Lee Osborn was cutting down a tree when the trunk split, kicked back and landed on top of him, according to the Cowlitz County Coroner’s Office. He died instantly. An autopsy determined the man died of blunt force trauma to the neck and chest, according to the Coroner’s Office. Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Capt. Corey Huffine said Osborn had recently purchased the property. Cowlitz County sheriff’s deputies and Fire District 5 responded to the 911 call at 11:46 a.m. at 727 Italian Creek Road. He was pronounced dead at the scene at 11:55 a.m., said Chief Deputy Coroner Brett Dundas…

Rochester, New York, WHEC-TV, March 9, 2017: Tree removal companies have a big job ahead

They’re barely done with the cleanup from last week’s chaos, but now they’re fielding record numbers of calls as winds continue to topple trees and crush homes. All day we’ve seen violent winds knock down trees and power lines across our area. Just last week, we spoke with Cindi Johnson of East Rochester after a large tree crashed into her living room. For Johnson, the sound of wild winds whipping reminds her of when a red oak tree pierced through her home. “The front dormer was ripped off and there was a tree in here and coming through the ceiling,” she says. Her yard was filled with limbs that took about five hours to clean up. “I’m just concerned about the winds that we’re going to get tonight,” Johnson adds…

Mount Pleasant, Michigan mLive, March 9, 2017: Two dead after heavy winds blow tree onto moving car

Heavy winds claimed the lives of two people in Clare County when a tree fell onto their moving vehicle. On Wednesday afternoon, March 8, Maxwell Muessig, 20, was driving a Mini Cooper east on M-115 Highway through Clare County’s Freeman Township. In the car with him was 23-year-old Margaretta Potter. As they neared the border between Clare and Osceola counties, a large tree fell on the Mini Cooper’s roof. The tree had been blown over by high winds, according to Michigan State Police troopers. Troopers from the Mount Pleasant Post responded to the crash site at about 4:25 p.m. Medical personnel pronounced both Muessig and Potter deceased at the scene…

Detroit, Michigan, mLive, March 8, 2017: Tree crushes Volkswagen amid destructive winds in Detroit

A Detroit man is going to come home from Montreal to a destroyed car after extraordinarily strong and sustained winds knocked down trees and power lines across southeast Michigan on Wednesday. Brian Ambrozy said he got a text from his wife at 12:20 p.m. with a picture of his roommate’s limited edition Volkswagen smashed by a downed tree in Detroit’s Woodbridge neighborhood. He said he believes the car is a limited edition 2006 Volkswagen Golf GTI. Ambrozy said his roommate flew to New Jersey to buy and drive the car back to Detroit about six months ago…

Washington, DC, Washington Business Journal, March 8, 2017: An investor wants to build three homes in Kent. A tree and some angry neighbors stand in the way

In Northwest D.C.’s Kent neighborhood, a battle is brewing over a large coffeetree. The Chain Bridge Road Preservation Committee, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization, has filed an appeal with the District’s Board of Zoning Adjustment to stop the planned construction of three single-family homes on University Terrace NW — on part of a 6-acre estate formerly owned by a DuPont heiress and her husband. The group said in its filing that construction of the homes, which will range from 3,886 square feet to 5,623 square feet plus “substantial” driveways and swimming pools, will kill the heritage Kentucky Coffeetree. The group also argues any tree removal on the property’s subdivided lots is prohibited, and that tree preservation rules created in the 1990s via the Chain Bridge Road/University Terrace Overlay zone bans large scale tree transplanting. The appeal asks that Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs revoke the building permits it issued in January. “The scale of the proposed development is substantial and can only be pursued based on ‘heroic’ and costly tree preservation efforts,” the appeal states. There is no margin for error or failure, it continues, and there is “no reasonable basis to conclude” that tree preservation will be successful…

West Seattle, Washington, West Seattle Blog, March 8, 2017: Ponderosa pine at heart of tree-vs.-house battle to be cut down today

A tree-cutting crew is preparing to take down the “exceptional tree” at 3036 39th SW that had been at the heart of a neighborhood battle – it’s the ~100-foot Ponderosa Pine growing in the middle of a lot where the new owner intends to build a house. Here’s how the tree looked when we first reported on it nine months ago, interviewing a young neighbor who wanted to save it. Our most-recent update was three weeks ago, when nearby resident Lisa Parriott announced she was taking the fight to court, after the city Hearing Examiner ruled in favor of property owner Cliff Low in January. Court records show Parriott’s Land Use Petition in the case is scheduled for a hearing on March 31st – more than three weeks away. But the tree that neighbors dubbed the “Silent Giant” will apparently be long gone by then. Crews from Ballard Tree Service first cut a smaller tree on the lot this morning and are getting ready to take down the pine tree, with an offduty police officer hired to provide security on site…

Columbus, Ohio, The Ohio State University, March 7, 2017: How soil moisture can help predict power outages caused by hurricanes

In the days before Hurricane Matthew, researchers used satellite maps of soil moisture to help forecast where the power would go out along the East Coast. At the American Geophysical Union meeting this week, they report that their method worked with 91 percent accuracy. The project aims to curtail outages by helping power companies allocate equipment and crews in advance of storms, said Steven Quiring, professor of atmospheric sciences at The Ohio State University.
Healthy trees that receive just the right amount of moisture are less prone to storm damage, he explained, so soil moisture is a good indicator of where outage crews will be needed. “We see increased numbers of outages at both ends of the spectrum—wherever soils are too wet or too dry,” Quiring said. “Drought makes tree branches more likely to snap off, and over-saturation makes trees more likely to be uprooted…”

New York City, Post, March 7, 2017: Sean Lennon settles tree lawsuit with Marisa Tomei’s parents

Sean Lennon finally gave peace a chance, settling a $10 million lawsuit over a rotting tree with his Greenwich Village neighbors who are actress Marisa Tomei’s parents. The details of the agreement are confidential but Gary Tomei told The Post that the 60-foot ailanthus tree finally came down last month after two years in court. “I’m just happy it’s over,” Tomei said. Roots from the diseased tree had cracked the Tomeis’ W. 13th Street stoop, crept into their basement and even compromised their foundation, according to the suit filed by Gary and his wife Addie…

Gardening Knowhow, March 7, 2017: Aspen tree information: Learn about Aspen trees in landscapes

Aspen trees are a popular addition to landscapes in Canada and the northern parts of the United States. The trees are beautiful with white bark and leaves that turn a striking shade of yellow in the autumn, but they can be finicky in a few different ways. One problem that many people come up against when growing aspen trees is their short lifespan. And it’s true – aspen trees in landscapes usually only live between 5 and 15 years. This is usually due to pests and diseases, which can be a real problem and sometimes have no treatment. If you notice your aspen becoming sick or infested, the best thing to do is often to cut the offending tree down. Don’t worry, you won’t be killing the tree. Aspens have large underground root systems that continually put up new suckers that will grow into large trunks if they have the space and the sunlight. In fact, if you see several aspens growing near each other, odds are good that they’re actually all parts of the same organism. These root systems are a fascinating element of the aspen tree. They allow the trees to survive forest fires and other aboveground problems. One aspen tree colony in Utah is thought to be over 80,000 years old…

Menlo Park, California, Almanac, March 7, 2017: If a tree falls on an Atherton road, who pays to move it?

If a tree falls in Atherton, who pays to get it out of the road? That question was pondered by Atherton’s City Council at a March 1 study session.City Attorney Bill Connors had recommended the town continue a practice begun last November of charging the owners of fallen trees in roadways all the costs of clearing them. But council members favored finding a way to revert to the town’s previous practice. The town had cleared trees from roadways at public expense, leaving the homeowner to pay for removing the rest of the tree from the roadside. Reverting to that policy might require changing town laws, the council was told…

Las Vegas, Nevada, KLAS-TV, March 7, 2017: Winds whip up business for tree service companies

Some homeowners have spent Monday getting everything cleaned up following a wild windstorm Sunday. It’s not often winds that strong are felt in the Las Vegas valley. Some neighborhoods were waking up to the sound of a cacophony of cleanup crews Monday morning cleaning downed trees. Wild winds whipping through the valley were enough to knock over power poles along Koval, just east of the Las Vegas Strip. “This weekend, there was a lot of wind, so we got a lot of emergency calls,” said Luis Martinez, Vegas Best Tree Service…

Los Angeles, California, Times, March 5, 2017: Woman killed by falling tree at Half Dome Village in Yosemite National Park

A 21-year-old woman was killed Sunday by a falling tree at Half Dome Village in Yosemite National Park. Park spokesman Scott Gediman told Sacramento television station KCRA that the accident happened about 11 a.m. in the area formerly known as Curry Village. No other information about the victim was made public. A windy, cold storm was sweeping through Northern California and dumped hail. Scattered showers were forecast for the region through Sunday. Gediman says rangers closed the village and had visitors leave the area after the accident. Weather conditions were improving Sunday afternoon, and rangers expected to reopen the area later in the day…

EurekAlert, March 6, 2017: Tree growth model assists breeding for more wood

A meeting in a forest between a biologist and a mathematician could lead to thicker, faster growing trees. “Mathematicians like translating biological processes into numbers,” said Andrei Smertenko, assistant professor in Washington State University’s Institute of Biological Chemistry. “I’m a biologist, and I want to help grow stronger, better trees.” Breeding trees is a time-consuming and imprecise field, with breeders relying on a few genetic markers and what they can see. It takes years before they see the traits they’re looking for in a young tree. To help speed things up, Smertenko and his WSU Department of Mathematics colleagues Vladyslav Oles and Alexander Panchenko have developed a new model that could help make tree breeding much easier…

Michigan State University Extension, March 6, 2017: Tree damage from squirrels can be severe during winter months

There are a number of wildlife species who utilize tree bark as a food source. Beavers cut down trees to get to the twigs and limbs. Porcupines have a varied diet, but strip bark from upper branches of trees through winter months when bark, twigs and needles make up most of their diet. Mice, voles and rabbits will gnaw the bark of younger shrubs and trees during winter. Usually mice and vole damage will be under the snow, while rabbit chomping will be above snow level. If this feeding encircles the trunk it prohibits all sap flow and the affected tree will either die or sprout from below the damage. Many individuals think of squirrel as nut or seed eaters. It varies with species, but squirrels are a more opportunistic feeder imagined. In addition to nuts and seeds, they utilize small fruit, field crops like corn, insects, and mushrooms and are active visitors to bird feeders. Fox and eastern grey squirrels have been found to strip and apparently feed on inner tree bark as well. In the northern regions, this bark gnawing activity is most evident in the late winter months, but there have been reports of different tree species being affected throughout the seasons. There are several theories as to why squirrels do this, but no hard evidence has been presented as an explanation…

Trenton, N.J., Times, March 6, 2017: What happens to the wood from 600-year-old tree remains uncertain

Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church officials will wait to see the quality of wood remaining from the iconic 600-year-old white oak tree that will be cut down during the week of April 24 before deciding how to preserve portions of the tree for its historic significance, said Jon Klippel, a member of the church’s Planning Council. The landmark tree, which has called the Basking Ridge Presbyterian Church home for centuries and has watched over parishioners and the adjacent graveyard for the past 300 years, has died and will be cut down. George Washington once picnicked under the iconic tree. “We’ve received a number of ideas, including using some of the wood in future building projects, but everything depends on what we find when we take the tree down,” said Klippel. “Decades ago, a large amount of concrete was implanted in the tree and we don’t know the internal location of that concrete and the degree of decay and rot that has occurred…”
bradford170306Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, The Oklahoman, March 5, 2017: The Bradford pear: Oklahoma’s worst tree or just misunderstood?

Cursed for its dense yet brittle branches that break off after ice storms and blamed for springtime allergies, the Bradford pear may be one of Oklahoma’s most despised trees. The ornamental blooming trees with sour-smelling flowers were initially thought to be sterile, but the Bradford has since become an invasive species in Oklahoma, sprouting up in clumps along fence lines and in fields. Wild Bradford pear started to be a problem in Oklahoma about 10 years ago and are rapidly expanding beyond shopping mall parking lots and suburban front lawns, said Karen Hickman, professor of Natural Resource Ecology and Management at Oklahoma State University. Hickman is also a founding member and past-president of the Oklahoma Invasive Plant Council. “It’s escaped and now it’s running rampant,” Hickman said. “Some people consider it as bad as eastern red cedar — it’s another person’s feral hog…”

Springfield, Massachusetts, The Republican, March 5, 2017: State Police identify North Reading woman who died after tree fell on car

Authorities identified the woman who was killed in Andover when a tree fell on a car Saturday as 58-year-old Elizabeth Roszkowski of North Reading. Massachusetts State Police troopers were called to Route 125 in Andover Saturday around 2:15 p.m. and discovered that a fallen tree had struck a 2007 Toyota Camry and the two occupants were trapped inside. Roszkowski’s husband, who is also 58, was driving. He was seriously hurt and taken to Lawrence General Hospital with life-threatening injuries, according to State Police…

visibility170306Chattanooga, Tennessee, Times-Free Press, March 5, 2017: Georgia Department of Transportation tree-trimming, bridge projects improve visibility, safety

Motorists who regularly travel Interstate 24 west of Chattanooga have noticed by now the trees on Georgia’s curvy stretch of highway along the state border have been cut back for a longer view. Maj. Tommy Bradford with the Dade County, Ga., Sheriff’s Department has patrolled the county for almost a quarter of a century and says heavy traffic through the corridor is dangerous. “The biggest problem is there’s so much traffic coming through there for a two-lane that it stays congested,” Bradford said. “Before, when we would have one wreck and traffic starts backing up on that and you’d get into those curves, you usually have another wreck back behind that.” While the hidden curves remain, the longer view should allow “more warning to be able to see in time,” Bradford said…

Mother Nature Network, March 5, 2017: How to transplant a tree

Do you have an “oops” tree in your yard? An oops in this case means the tree needs to be transplanted. Maybe it was planted in the wrong place. Maybe it’s in the way of your long-awaited new addition. Or, maybe “all of a sudden you have a news flash and you think ‘Oh my goodness, this thing is going to eat my house, and I need to move it before I have a problem,’” says Sheri Dorn, Extension horticulturalist and the Georgia Master Gardener Coordinator in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Georgia in Griffin. Whatever the reason, the tree needs to be transplanted. Worse, as you look at it and contemplate where you should move it, how you’re going to safely dig it up, carry it to its new home and re-plant it, you may have a sudden sinking feeling that you don’t have a clue about how to transplant it without doing harm. If you’re in that predicament, you’re in luck. Here’s Dorn’s step-by-step suggestions for transplanting a tree and how to determine if your efforts were successful…

treekill170303Whittier, California, Daily News, March 1, 2017: Family of grandmother killed in Penn Park tree collapse in Whittier to seek millions from city

Family members of a 61-year-old grandmother who was killed when a massive eucalyptus tree toppled onto their wedding party at Penn Park in December could soon file a lawsuit blaming the city for the deadly collapse, according to the family’s attorney. Brian Leinbach, the attorney for five family members of Margarita Mojarro, along with 18 others who said they were injured when the tree fell, said the family will seek millions of dollars in the lawsuit. “You have wrongful death, brain damage and a litany of serious injuries — we’re talking about a multiple well over $10 million,” he said. In a unanimous vote Tuesday, the Whittier City Council denied the family’s claim, along with two others, one by an assistant to the wedding photographers and another by the father of the groom…

Denver, Colorado, Post, February 27, 2017: Denver Water tree-thinning effort to protect watershed, prevent fires is expanded to private property

Tree-thinning intended to help heal the West’s ailing forests has become an essential part of providing water for city-dwellers: Denver Water, state and federal officials on Monday renewed a $33 million deal for work on 40,000 acres of public land and also on more than 5,000 acres of private land. The “Forests to Faucets” deal signed by Denver Water, the Colorado State Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service and U.S. Forest Service builds on a $33 million 2010 initiative that led to thinning on 48,000 acres of public land, utility officials said. “We’ve seen tremendous results during the first five years of this partnership and we are excited to now expand the program to include private lands,” Denver Water manager Jim Lochhead said. Logging contractors enlisted in the effort clear trees from beetle-ravaged forests where large wildfires and erosion threaten water supplies. Denver Water officials have said investing in forest health helps avoid having to un-clog reservoirs and water delivery systems later at far greater cost…