News Links – 2019

Atlanta, Georgia, Journal Constitution, January 8, 2019: Family sues Atlanta Boy Scouts after son killed by tree while camping

A Texas family is suing the the group that oversees Boy Scouts programs in metro Atlanta claiming negligence led to their 14-year-old son’s June death. The parents of Elijah Knight filed the wrongful death lawsuit Tuesday in State Court in Cobb County where the Atlanta Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America has its headquarters. Knight was crushed by a tree that fell on his tent during a thunderstorm on June 25 at Bert Adams Scout Camp. Knight and about 100 Boy Scouts from his Texas troop were camping at the 1,300-acre Covington camp, which is run by the Council. “This is a very difficult time for our Scouting family. We offer our deepest condolences to the victim and his family, and we will support them in any way we can,” the council said Council when asked for a statement Tuesday. “The safety of our Scouts is our number one priority. Please join us in keeping those affected by the tragic accident during last summer’s severe storms in our thoughts and prayers.” The lawsuit claims the adults on the trip did not follow the group’s own bylaws about seeking shelter during inclement weather. According to the suit, the National Weather Service warned that the area could be in for 60-mph winds and quarter-sized hail about a half hour before Knight died…

Charleston, South Carolina, Post & Courier, January 8, 2019: Man appeals his conviction, jail sentence in IOP tree cutting case

The man who was sentenced to jail time for cutting down two significant trees on the Isle of Palms is appealing the verdict. Jonathan Gandolfo, who hired a contractor to cut down two trees on a Carolina Boulevard property that was not his, filed a notice of appeal Monday. The motion will be considered by a municipal judge Wednesday, IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso said. Gandolfo was found guilty on two counts related to the cutting last month in municipal court. He faces five days total in the county jail and two weekends of community service. To date, he’s served one night of that sentence and paid a $1,087 fine. He declined to comment this week. His attorney for the jury trial, Frank Cornely, said he will not handle the appeal. The trees in question were on a property Gandolfo was attempting to buy, Cornely previously told The Post and Courier, but the sale ultimately didn’t close. According to a police report detailing the 2016 tree removal, Gandolfo told a contractor to “be a ninja about it and be quick so the code guys don’t interrupt you.” Though it’s not uncommon for tree cutting rules to spark controversies, it’s rare that they lead to actual jail time. IOP City Council could have accepted a settlement from Gandolfo before his case went to trial, but it voted 5-4 in November to decline that option…

Secaucus, New Jersey, The Jersey Journal, January 8, 2019: State agencies halt tree cutting at cemetery that looked ‘like a war zone’

Soil stabilization measures at Weehawken Cemetery began Friday after a pair of state agencies intervened when work crews went on a massive tree removal spree without obtaining the proper authorizations, officials said. A professional engineer hired by the cemetery met with two representatives from Hudson Essex Passaic Soil Conservation District and the state’s Water Compliance and Enforcement on Thursday morning at the cemetery — located at 4000 Bergen Turnpike in North Bergen — to discuss immediate soil control measures caused by extensive tree cutting. Erosion control measures are expected to be completed within a week, which began with the installation of hay bales and crushed stone in and around the areas of disturbed soil. “We all agreed on how to handle the situation,” Calisto Bertin, the engineer on site, wrote Monday in an email to The Jersey Journal. “First my office prepared an ‘interim’ stabilization plan to address the immediate measures to stabilize the soil.” The HEP Soil Conservation District — which addresses storm water, soil erosion and sedimentation issues that result from land disturbance activities — issued a Stop Work Order on Dec. 29 because the cemetery failed to obtain a valid soil erosion and sediment control certification prior to disturbing more than 5,000 square feet of soil during the tree clearing…

Salem, Oregon, Capital Press, January 8, 2019: Tree fruit companies on sales block

Several tree fruit companies in Central Washington are being sold or have gone out of business as costs and competitive pressures continue to force consolidation in the industry. Out-of-state private equity firms are involved in some of the acquisitions. Principals in several transactions did not respond or declined to talk on the record. One of the latest transactions involves International Farming Corp., an agricultural investment firm in Kinston, N.C., that is buying Legacy Fruit Packers and Valley Fruit III, both of Wapato, and Larson Fruit Co. of Selah. A Larson family member verified the sales and referred inquiries to International Farming, which declined comment. Four years ago, Valley Fruit and Larson Fruit formed a new company, Legacy Fruit Packers, to build a $17 million apple-packing plant in Wapato. The deal was reached to have enough capital to build the new packing plant to remain competitive, Dean Gardner, CEO of all three companies, said at the time. Valley and Larson maintained separate orchards and cherry packing lines. Legacy has sold its fruit through its partnership in Sage Fruit Co., a Yakima marketing company that also sells the fruit of Olympic Fruit in Moxee and Valicoff Fruit Co. in Wapato. According to a Legacy-Sage website, Legacy packs approximately 4 million boxes of fruit annually from 3,650 acres owned by Valley and Larson. Legacy, Valley and Larson have over 530 full-time employees…

San Francisco, California, KNTV, January 7, 2019: Storm may have caused massive tree to fall on car, killing Novato man at UC Berkeley campus

A weekend storm might be to blame for the death of a man in the East Bay. Authorities say a 32-year-old man from Novato died after a massive tree came crashing down on a car at the UC Berkeley campus Sunday afternoon. The owner of the tree service company in charge of cleaning out the tree tells NBC Bay Area the eucalyptus tree was tall, heavy and most surprisingly, it was healthy. A combination of rain and wind was enough to push over the tree and tragically kill someone, the owner of the tree service company said. The incident was reported shortly before 4 p.m. Emergency crews responded to a call that a huge eucalyptus tree had tumbled and smashed a car by the Greek Theatre on Gayley Road. The Coroner’s Office says the driver of the car was Alexander Grant…

San Francisco, California, Hoodline, January 7, 2019: Ficus tree safety concerns top Hayes Valley meeting agenda

A week and a half ago, a fallen tree shut down all traffic on Hayes Street for over six hours, causing headaches for drivers and Muni buses in the heart of Hayes Valley. Now, Hayes Valley residents will have the chance to hear from city officials on their future plans to maintain street trees in the neighborhood, and protect residents from the potential dangers of falling trees or tree limbs. Mohammed Nuru, the director of SF Public Works, and Nancy Sarieh, the public information officer at the Bureau of Urban Forestry, will join the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association tonight to discuss tree safety, as well as street cleaning concerns and homelessness issues. Created after the passage of a November 2016 ballot initiative, the StreetTreesSF maintenance program has transferred responsibility of the care of street trees from city property owners to SF Public Works. Ultimately designed to establish a regular three-to-five-year maintenance schedule for the city’s street trees, the program is funded by a $19 million set-aside in the city’s general fund…

New York City, The New York Times, January 7, 2019: Free trees? Many Detroit residents say no thanks

Deborah Westbrook, a lifelong resident of Detroit, would love a tree in front of her home. “With a green tree in front of my house,” she said, “and me looking at the green leaves, knowing that the tree and sun were mixing together to give off the oxygen we breathe? I would be proud. A tree in front of my house would not only help with the air, but it would help with me.” Nonetheless, when representatives from a local nonprofit came to plant trees on her block five years ago, Ms. Westbrook said no. So did more than 1,800 Detroiters — a quarter of all eligible residents — between 2011 and 2014. Why the high rejection rate? In a study published Monday in Society and Natural Resources, researchers found that the opposition does not arise from a dislike of trees per se. Most residents, the study found, appreciate the benefits of trees; these include alleviating air pollution, storm-water runoff and higher urban temperatures, and helping to reduce stress, crime and noise. Low-income and minority residents often live in areas with the lowest tree cover…

Omaha, Nebraska, World-Herald, January 7, 2019: The screwdriver test can tell you whether you need to water your trees

Go outside and jam a screwdriver in the ground. If you act on what you learn, your trees will thank you. During winter, homeowners often neglect to keep their trees, plants and yards well-watered, but the greenery needs hydration now. “Any water is going to be better than nothing,” said Scott Evans, horticulturist with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Office. “The fine roots can actually shrink as the soil dries out. Those fine roots are the ones that pick up the nutrients and the water.” So on winter days when highs top 40 degrees — like the ones we have had lately — use the screwdriver test. If a screwdriver 4 inches or longer easily sinks into the ground up to the handle, the ground is thawed enough to water. “If not, it’s frozen,” Evans said. “It’s pretty self-explanatory…”

Lihui, Hawaii, The Garden Island, January 7, 2019: Giving trees, planting seeds

As Hawaii looks at ways to become more self-sufficient in food production, people on Kauai are planting seeds that will feed the community decades down the road. They’re planting orchards near food banks and schools, and the harvests will be distributed for free in school lunches and to supplement canned goods for needy families. Four of Kauai’s schools have received enough trees for mini-orchards that students will be planting and caretaking. A mini-orchard was just planted at Church of the Pacific in Princeville, with five trees. It’s called the Giving Tree program, facilitated by the nonprofit Malama Kauai and open to anyone who will pledge to host a mini-orchard and give away for free all the food produced. “We’ve gotten half of our trees and we’re waiting for the other half to come into the nursery,” said Caitlyn Madrid, natural resources teacher at Kauai High School. “We’re going to be planting in mid to late-January…”

Spartanburg, South Carolina, WSPA-TV, January 7, 2019: Recent rain, snow downing more trees in area

Record rain in some parts of the Upstate and Western North Carolina is causing more downed trees according to a local arborist. Isaiah Copeland with A&C Tree Service in Spartanburg says the amount of rain that hit the area over the last few months has oversaturated the ground. “Over a period of time and with the weight of the tree, if it’s leaning a certain way or certain direction it will come over and come up out of the ground,” Copeland said. The area was hit with a snow storm that further weakened the roots of many trees. “This is why a lot of times you want to get your tree line back from your house, so in case something does fall… that it won’t hit your house,” he said. All those down trees are keeping the local arborist busy, removing limbs for some people and entire trees for others. Copeland says it’s been great for business. “It is a good things in a certain way, but I just don’t want anyone to get hurt,” Copeland told 7News. Copeland says homeowners really need to consider a few things, if they have lots of trees on their property, especially if some of those trees are leaning towards the house. “You want to go up and take some of the weight off, if you don’t want to remove the tree, because a lot of people want to keep their shade,” Copeland said…

Boulder, Colorado, Public News Service, January 7, 2019: Aerial Study Discovers Dead, Dying Trees in Arizona Forests

The latest assessment of forests across Arizona showed unexpectedly large areas of dead or dying trees. Aerial surveys conducted by the U.S. Forest Service in mid-2018 found about 1.7 million acres of ponderosa pine, piñon, and juniper trees with yellowing, red or brown needles. Forest Service officials attribute the problem to increased stress due to extended drought and other effects of climate change. Sandy Bahr, executive director of the Grand Canyon Chapter of the Sierra Club, said another factor is that elected officials refuse to deal with climate change. “In Arizona, one of the things that we’ve asked the governor, ‘Hey we need a plan. We don’t have a plan,’” Bahr said. “We don’t have a plan for reducing emissions, and we don’t have a plan for dealing with the many issues that we’re seeing.” During his 2018 reelection campaign, Gov. Doug Ducey said he’s confident the energy marketplace will solve climate change, and that new regulations aren’t needed. Forest Service scientists say drought weakens trees, which are then killed by infestations of bark beetles and other insects. Most of Arizona has been in a continuous drought since 2009, with no relief in sight. Bahr said she thinks forest managers should return to a program of proscribed or controlled burns to help preserve the state’s woodlands…

Quora.com, January 7, 2019: Why isn’t bamboo wood a bigger worldwide industry, since it grows so quickly and is so strong? Couldn’t it replace lumber and save many trees?

Okay, here is the long answer. Bamboo is the collective name for several dozen genera of grasses, all in the Bambusoideae branch of the “BOP” clade. While most bamboo species are either shrubby or relatively short plants, a couple genera include particularly large species, typically called “timber bamboo” or “giant bamboo.” These are the bamboo of relevance. Being in the grass family, bamboo is not a tree. Thus, material cut from bamboo stalks is not technically “wood.” Because of its roughly similar properties, however, and for marketing reasons, it often is referred to as a wood. With that pedantry out of the way, let’s consider the uses of wood, and how bamboo compares. The big ones are fuel, lumber, and paper. There are basically three different forms of fuel that bamboo can be consumed. One is as firewood. When I was a young boy scout, there was a large patch of giant bamboo growing beside our scout hut. We would often cut some for use as poles to practice lashing with. Every now and then we would have some sort of fire going. Who am I kidding? We were young boy scouts, we had various sorts of fire all the time. And, of course, “every now and then” some brilliant greenhorn would get the bright idea to add bamboo to the fire…

Santa Rosa, California, Press-Democrat, January 3, 2019: Nonprofit restores Sonoma County’s natural habitat with oak tree seedlings

When Natalie Portis first stepped onto her property in Sonoma nearly 20 years ago, she was immediately enchanted by the verdant natural landscape and the stately oak trees. Portis’ wooded oasis was among the thousands of acres of forests and oak-studded landscapes that burned in the October 2017 Nuns fire, which claimed her home and an estimated 700 trees on her 10-acre Castle Road property. “It still feels surreal,” Portis, 59, said. “It was devastating to go back there and see the singed trees. I just remember being there and feeling the grief and toll of such loss.” She’s rebuilding her home and plans to move in this summer. It’s been a “painful” process, but a bright spot came last month as she planted 21 oak tree seedlings sprouted from acorns collected by local volunteers in the weeks after the devastating wildfires two years ago in Sonoma County. “It was very playful and very sweet, and it put a huge smile on my face,” she said of planting the young coast live oaks on her property with help from members of the California Native Plant Society. “I feel like I’m going to get back home…”

SBWire, January 3, 2019: Tree Trimmer Market Analysis 2018-2025, Summary and Growth Outlook to 2025

This report studies the Tree Trimmer market size (value and volume) by players, regions, product types and end industries, history data 2013-2017 and forecast data 2018-2025; This report also studies the global market competition landscape, market drivers and trends, opportunities and challenges, risks and entry barriers, sales channels, distributors and Porter’s Five Forces Analysis. The tree trimmer is equipment employed to prune trees or remove a diseased or damaged part of a tree in order to maintain safety of the public and maintain health of the tree. Tree trimmers are widely utilized in local parks, forestry departments, and commercial landscapes. Expansion of the landscaping business is driving the tree trimmer market. Skilled workers are employed by commercial and corporates for tree trimming services and landscaping gardens. Increased preference for green spaces among cities is fueling the demand for tree trimmers. Emphasis on public safety has prompted firefighters and governments to trim trees that are likely to fall and disrupt safety. North America is prone to summer cyclones and witnesses a high demand for tree trimmers. Tree trimmers are employed to prune branches and trees during a cyclone warning in order to avoid the property damage by falling trees. Asia Pacific and other tropical countries also witnessed a high demand for tree trimmers owing to their requirement to cut branches & trees before the monsoon. Rise in awareness among public and governments for safety of pedestrian and property is driving the tree trimmer market. Increased construction activity in developing countries and expansion of the real estate industry are anticipated to propel the demand for tree trimmers…

Texarkana, Arkansas, Gazette, January 3, 2019: Moon Tree: Historic Washington pine from seed that traveled aboard Apollo 14

A tree in Arkansas’ Historic Washington State Park has a connection to the United States space program that one astronaut’s daughter is reminding the world of more than 40 years after the tree was planted. An ordinary-looking loblolly pine tree on the park’s grounds came from a seed that orbited the moon with astronaut Stuart Roosa during the Apollo 14 mission in 1971. It is one of less than 100 Moon Trees still living that Roosa’s daughter Rosemary Roosa wants to preserve, promote and propagate through a nonprofit foundation she created. “I’m trying to keep these living legacies from Apollo alive,” she said in a recent interview. During Apollo 14, the third mission to land men on the moon, Stuart Roosa piloted the command module in lunar orbit while Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell spent two days on the surface. Among personal items Roosa was allowed to bring were 400 to 500 seeds from loblolly pine, sycamore, sweetgum, redwood and douglas fir trees, taken along as an experiment sponsored by NASA and the U.S. Forest Service. No one could predict the effects on the seeds…

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Journal-Sentinel, January 3, 2018: Here’s why more than 60 trees will be removed in Menomonee Falls this year

More than 60 public trees will come down this year as part of a new village plan to fight invasive species. Wisconsin is one of several states infected by the emerald ash borer, an Asian jewel beetle that feeds on North American ash trees. It was first detected in Southeastern Wisconsin in 2008. The species’ presence was confirmed in Menomonee Falls in March 2016. Then village staff teamed up with Wachtel Tree Science to create an inventory of public trees and a five-year treatment plan for infected ones. Their work will be financed with $21,504.74 in matching grant funds from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Arlyn Johnson, director of Menomonee Falls’ public works department, said they’re waiting for the money to be reimbursed…

Los Angeles, California, Times, January 2, 2019: L.A.’s trees are more essential than ever. The city needs to start treating them that way

While bird lovers, environmentalists and poets have long put a high value on trees, the hard-nosed number crunchers in government have not. Trees have often been treated as merely aesthetic enhancements. Nice, but not essential. That’s one reason why tree maintenance is among the first government services cut during a recession. That limited view is changing, and there is increasing recognition that trees are more than just pretty things. With climate change, big trees will be increasingly useful to remove pollution from the air, collect water during rainstorms and create shade that cools nearby property. But for all the benefits that trees provide Los Angeles, city officials still do not hold the urban forest in the same regard as other public infrastructure, like streets and storm drains. That’s one of the key findings from a recent report commissioned by City Plants, a nonprofit that works with city departments to plant and care for public trees…

Abilene, Texas, Reporter News, January 2, 2019: How long will a tree live?

One of the things I often mention when writing or talking about trees, is their potential lifespans. For instance, I recommend against planting ash trees as the main shade tree in a yard, not because they aren’t good shade trees (they are), but because they are short lived. Ash trees have lots of good uses in urban settings, but planting one with the intention of it being the most important shade tree in a particular landscape, isn’t one of them. Generally, when someone raises the subject of how long a tree will live, the first part of that conversation is it’s genetic abilities. For example, if someone asks me how long a live oak will last, my first response is that genetically, it’s capable of living several centuries. Personally, if there were some way to accurately ascertain it, I wouldn’t be surprised at all to find out that there are numerous live oaks in this area past their 400th birthday. For reasons that I won’t get into here, it is a lot harder to figure out how old a large live oak is, than most people understand…

Associated Press, January 2, 2019: Now’s a good time to savor the subtle beauty of trees’ barks

Autumn’s fiery-colored leaves have fallen, so now let’s look for more subtle beauty in trees and shrubs. Like a developing photographic image, the textures and colors of bark come into view in the increasingly stark winter landscape. Paper birch isn’t the only tree with bark worth looking at. Take a look at the spectrum of colors in bark. There are reds ranging from the fire-engine red of the shrubby redosier dogwood to the coppery reddish-brown of the Nanking cherry to the dulled red-brown of Cryptomeria. Individual trees of river birch each have their own bark hue, some cinnamon-brown, others reddish-brown or grayish-brown. If you think pale gray is a boring color for bark, look at the bark of a hundred-year-old beech: The trunk and limbs seem alive enough to start moving. The bark of some trees is decoratively dabbled with colors. Sycamore is one of the most familiar of such trees, but lacebark pine and stewartia also are worth planting for their bark alone. The pine’s bark is richly mottled in browns and greens. Stewartia has a gray bark daubed with cinnamon and dark olive-green…

Berkeley, California, Daily Californian, January 2, 2019: UC Berkeley begins tree removal in People’s Park amid community backlash

UC Berkeley began the removal of about 41 trees in People’s Park early Friday morning, generating criticism and backlash from community members. The landscaping department is addressing deferred tree maintenance across campus, with the People’s Park project one of a list of 15 tree maintenance projects. A work crew began the People’s Park project by removing and pruning about a dozen trees Friday. The campus plans to remove about 16 medium to large trees and 25 small trees to grade level from the park. “Performing tree work during curtailment allows us to be efficient and minimize interruptions,” said campus spokesperson Dan Mogulof in an email. Other sites near campus set for tree maintenance include the old art museum, the Women’s Faculty Club, Boalt Parking Lot, Hearst Gymnasium for Women, Jean Gray Hargrove Music Library, Carleton Street, Piedmont Avenue, West Crescent, Sproul Plaza, Sather Gate, Wurster Hall and the tennis court on Bancroft Way. There has been recent controversy surrounding People’s Park since the campus released its plans to develop housing on the site in May 2018…

Houston, Texas, Chronicle, January 1, 2019: Dakota Access pipeline developer slow to replace some trees

The developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline missed a year-end deadline to plant thousands of trees along the pipeline corridor in North Dakota, but the company said it was still complying with a settlement of allegations it violated state rules during construction. Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, which built the $3.8 billion pipeline that’s now moving North Dakota oil to Illinois, is falling back on a provision of the September 2017 agreement that provides more time should the company run into problems. The company must provide 20,000 trees to county soil conservation districts along the pipeline’s 359-mile (578-kilometer) route across North Dakota. The deal with North Dakota’s Public Service Commission settled allegations that ETP removed too many trees in some areas and that it improperly handled a pipeline route change after discovering Native American artifacts. The artifacts were not disturbed. The agreement required the company to replant trees and shrubs at a higher ratio in the disputed areas, along with an additional 20,000 trees along the entire route. ETP filed documents in October detailing efforts by a contractor to plant 141,000 trees and shrubs, but the PSC asked the company a month later to provide more documentation that it had complied with all settlement terms…

Manalapan, New Jersey, Examiner, January 1, 2019: Helping American chestnut trees recover from blight

“Chestnuts roasting on an open fire” is an American tradition, but the tradition actually dates back to prehistoric times. Roasting chestnuts is a big part of Italian holidays, and chestnuts are an important food crop in Asia and southern Europe. The chestnuts we roast these days don’t come from our native American chestnut trees that once numbered in the billions and dominated forests throughout the eastern United States. Today our roasted chestnuts are Asian varieties. For thousands of years, the native American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was one of the most important forest trees. Each fall, the tree’s sweet nuts would blanket forest floors, providing a bounty for critters and humans alike. Strong, rot-resistant chestnut wood was a prized building material. But in the late 1800s, a bark fungus was accidentally introduced into North America on imported Asiatic chestnut trees. American chestnuts had little resistance, and the resulting blight, first discovered in 1904 in New York City, quickly spread. Within 50 to 60 years, three to four billion American chestnut trees died. Although a small percentage of American chestnut trees survived the blight, the great chestnut forests that had existed for millennia were gone. “The blight was one of the first ecological tragedies to hit this continent,” said Rex Parker, a member of the Hopewell Township Environmental Commission, which is leading an effort to restore American chestnuts in central New Jersey…

Portland, Oregon, KPTV, January 1, 2019: Oregon experts warn of invasive species that hitched a ride on N. Carolina Christmas trees

While families celebrate the New Year, many are getting rid of their Christmas trees this week. With that comes a warning from the Oregon Department of Forestry about an invasive insect that could pose a problem if you don’t dispose of your tree the right way. Experts say roughly 8,000 Frasier Fir trees shipped from North Carolina to big box stores on the West Coast had elongate hemlock scale, an invasive species not native to the Northwest. The Oregon Department of Agriculture found the pest and ordered the infested trees destroyed, but not before some had been shipped to big box stores all along the West Coast. The fear is that when Christmas trees are left for weeks or months in a yard or dumped in a park or the woods, eggs laid on them will hatch and the pest may escape into nearby trees. According to a new release from the Oregon Department of Forestry, if the elongate hemlock scale does get established in Oregon, it could be bad news for the state’s timber economy. The pest attacks not only hemlocks, but several conifer species native to Oregon, like true firs, spruce and Douglas-fir…

Eco-Business, January 1, 2019: Tree resin could replace oil and gas in household products

The loblolly pine isn’t the first choice of Christmas tree lovers. It’s not as compact as fir or spruce, and its needles are longer, so it doesn’t hold ornaments well. But the loblolly has a storied history, nonetheless. The famous Eisenhower Tree, on the 17th hole of the Augusta National Golf Club, was the bane of President Eisenhower. He hit it so many times while playing that he asked the club to cut it down. To avoid offending the president, the club’s chairman abruptly adjourned the meeting, rather than reject his request. (In 2014, the late president finally got his wish when an ice storm damaged the tree so badly, it had to be removed.) Loblolly pine seeds also travelled aboard Apollo 14 and were planted all around the country upon their return, including on the grounds of the White House. Some of these moon trees still survive. Today, the loblolly is serving a more noble purpose by helping limit the need for fossil fuels. Researchers, tinkering with the tree’s genetics, have found a way to reverse-engineer how the loblolly produces resin, a discovery that could help manufacturers produce greener alternatives for a range of goods now made with oil and gas, including surface coatings, adhesives, printing inks, flavors, fragrances, vitamins, household cleaning products, paint, varnish, shoe polish and linoleum…

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