And Now The News …

San Francisco, California, KPIX-TV, January 16, 2020: Federal Judge Threatens to Force PG&E to Hire More Tree Trimmers

A federal judge on Thursday threatened to force Pacific Gas & Electric to hire more tree trimmers to reduce the chances of its electrical grid igniting fires in Northern California and adhere to a requirement imposed after the utility’s natural gas lines blew up a neighborhood a decade ago. U.S. District Judge William Alsup notified PG&E he expects more precautions to be taken, a day after the San Francisco company acknowledged in a court filing that as many as 22,000 trees in its sprawling service territory may still be creating fire hazards. Those dangers are one reason the nation’s largest utility has resorted to deliberately turning off the power in dry, windy and hot conditions — a strategy that at one point left an estimated 2 million people without power in October. PG&E has said the deliberate blackouts could be a recurring event for the next decade while it spends billions of dollars to upgrade its outdated electrical grid. Alsup said he thinks that reliance on blackouts stems in part from PG&E’s tree-trimming shortcomings. The company said it will respond to Alsup by his Feb. 12 deadline. In its disclosure Wednesday to the judge, PG&E asserted it’s unrealistic to expect it to be able to ensure all trees are maintained in a way that ensures all the branches, leaves and other vegetation remain a safe distance from its transmission lines…

Chicago, Illinois, WLS-TV, January 16, 2020: Chicago Water Dept. tests tree-saving technology in Andersonville

More than a dozen trees in Andersonville are saved, thanks to a new pilot program the city of Chicago’s Water Department is implementing. “These mature trees are one of the most valuable things that we have to keep us healthy,” said Lesley Ames, Andersonville tree committee member. Last year, the water department was scheduled to complete routine sewage maintenance and drain removal. To do that, they’d have to cut down trees around the neighborhood, some of them more than 100 years old. “It seemed to us to be an abnormal number of trees,” Tamara Schiller said. Schiller is also a member of the tree committee and has lived in the neighborhood for more than 30 years. “There were ten trees alone on my block, so we started looking into it and said, ‘Isn’t there something else that could be done?'” Schiller said. “The more people found out about it, the more people came out into the street and wanted to find out what was going on,” Ames added. People like Ames and Schiller talked to their neighbors, their alderman and the water department to find an alternative. After months of back and forth, they found one: a CIPP or cured-in-place-pipe…

Charleston, South Carolina, Post & Courier, January 16, 2020: Dominion Energy will cut down nearly 250 palmetto trees on Sullivan’s Island

Palmetto logs famously helped Fort Moultrie absorb a pounding from British cannonballs in 1776, and many palmettos there survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989. But the iconic trees are no match for the coming buzz of Dominion Energy’s chainsaws. The utility plans to cut down nearly 250 palmettos on the island where some residents are still smarting from the extensive tree-trimming Dominion conducted there last year. “They’ve already butchered things here and in Mount Pleasant and West Ashley and James Island,” said William Fuller, who has lived on the island since before Hugo. “Dominion, ‘schmominion’ — I don’t know what they are doing.” Utility tree-trimming is often controversial, but it’s particularly fraught when palmetto trees are involved. That’s because those trees can’t be trimmed shorter, so it means removing them entirely. “It’s very disturbing to a lot of residents,” said Sullivan’s Island Administrator Andy Benke. “I actually have three near my yard that are coming out. “They are just such wonderful trees to have, and I’m sad to see them go,” he said. “I don’t know that there’s anything the town can do…”

Middletown, New York, Times Herald, January 16, 2020: The Balmville Tree

The Balmville Tree, that grew in Balmville, was the oldest Eastern Cottonwood on record in the United States. Scientists in 1953 determined it started growing in 1699. There was a fable which told that the tree sprang to life when George Washington, who made his headquarters in Newburgh from 1783-84, planted his walking stick. But the tree began its life 33 years before Washington. The beloved tree grew at the intersection of three Indian trails. It grew quickly due to the plentiful supply of water, achieving a height of more than 85-feet and a circumference of 25-feet. In the latter half of the 20th-century, the roadways around the tree were redirected to avoid having it damaged. Concrete and stone were placed at its base which later caused the tree to weaken. In 1976 the NYSDEC declared the 348-square-foot site a “public historic park.” The DEC maintained the tree but the trunk soon turned hollow and the trunk was split after being hit by Hurricane Floyd causing the crown to be trimmed down. Preservation efforts were made to save the tree but in 2015 the tree was cut down due to safety concerns. A 15-foot tall stump remains and it is still a protected area…

Huffington Post, January 16, 2020: In Rare Good News, Australia Says Endangered ‘Dinosaur Trees’ Saved From Devastating Fires

Australian officials said Thursday that a stand of trees with ancestors that date back 200 million years was saved from a series of devastating bushfires, a glimmer of good news as the country begins recovering from the ongoing disaster. New South Wales Environment Minister Matt Kean said a team of firefighters was deployed to a remote part of the Blue Mountains, about 120 miles northwest of Sydney, as a massive bushfire approached. Fire officials used planes to water-bomb the area and lowered firefighters into a remote gorge to set up an irrigation system to wet the ground and save the trees, called Wollemi pines. “Wollemi National Park is the only place in the world where these trees are found in the wild and, with less than 200 left, we knew we needed to do everything we could to save them,” Kean said in a statement Thursday. “The pines, which prior to 1994 were thought to be extinct and whose location is kept secret to prevent contamination, benefited from an unprecedented environmental protection mission.” The area hosts the only known natural cluster of Wollemi pines, which are colloquially known as “dinosaur trees” because fossil records show they date back as far as 200 million years. The species was thought long extinct until they were discovered by a park ranger about 26 years ago…

Dayton, Ohio, Daily News, January 15, 2020: Free tree seedlings to help heal tornado-damaged areas

Five Rivers MetroParks is launching a reforestation to help replace thousands of trees ripped from their roots by Memorial Day tornadoes and heal the community. Damage to trees was immense and remains an inescapable loss, but replacing them will help heal the community, said Becky Benná, Five Rivers MetroParks’ executive director.“An untold number of trees, shrubs and other plants critical to our region’s wildlife and natural heritage were lost during the storms,” she said. “It’s important we replant in the areas where so many were lost to tornado damage.” The project, called Healing Nature, will provide communities and individuals with trees native to Ohio. A limited number of free seedlings will become available to the public in April…

Fall River, Massachusetts, Herald News, January 15, 2020: Tiverton has an unsolved mystery: Who cut down more than two dozen trees to improve the view?

The only thing clear in this mystery is there’s an unobstructed view of the water now that someone lopped off all but a few feet of more than two dozen trees on a waterfront lot on Main Road owned by the town. Who did it, and why, is under investigation by the police department, Capt. Michael Miguel said of the property across from 1644 Main Road, just south of St. Christopher’s Church and across from Jennifer Lane. Police Chief Patrick Jones said police have conducted “an exhaustive investigation,” and are asking that anyone with information contact them. Town Councilman John Edwards V suggested Monday night that the Town Council offer a reward for information, but that may be discussed at another meeting. “It’s not every day a bunch of trees get lopped off and nobody knows what happened,” said Council President Patricia Hilton. “They lopped all the trees off at the height of the chain-link fence. This happened on Main Road. Somebody saw something.” It happened Jan. 2, it is believed, because someone went to town hall Jan. 3 and told Town Clerk Nancy Mello about it…

Ahmedabad, India, The Times of India, January 16, 2020: Ahmedabad: Man beaten for objecting to tree felling

A 30-year-old man from Sarkhej on Tuesday filed a complaint with police alleging that his neighbour and two of his family members assaulted him as the complainant objected to them cutting trees in the housing society. In his FIR with the Sarkhej police, Faruq Mansuri, 30, a taxi driver and a resident of Bilal Park Society in Sarkhej said he had seen his neighbour Altaf Mansuri cutting trees in the society. “I told him not to cut the threes as they are needed, Altaf got angry at me and began abusing me. I responded and an argument ensued over the issue,” said Faruq in the complaint. To avoid a fight with Altaf, Faruq did argue more and left the place. Later, he went to drive his taxi. When Faruq returned to his home at around 7pm on Tuesday, Altaf, his wife and their son rushed to their home and began arguing about why he had stopped them from cutting the trees. As Faruq tried to tell them about the values of trees, Altaf and his family members began abusing him again. When Faruq’s wife intervened, Altaf’s wife hit her and as Faruq tried to rescue his wife, he was assaulted by Altaf and his son…

Phys.org, January 14, 2020: RNA provides clues to explain longevity of ginkgo trees

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found that ginkgo biloba trees do not experience senescence. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their RNA analysis of Ginkgo biloba cambium and what they learned from it. Prior research has shown that ginkgo biloba trees can live for a long as 1000 years. To learn more about their longevity, the team working in China collected tissue samples from nine ginkgoes aged approximately 600, 200 and 20 years old. Prior efforts at studying tree aging were focused on the leaves. In this new effort, the researchers were more interested in the vascular cambium—the thin layer of tissue that produces outer bark and inner wood. RNA analysis showed no sign of senescence. They did find that the older trees produced less auxin, a common plant hormone, and more abscisic acid, a hormone produced in response to stress. The older trees also had thinner annual rings. But there was little difference in efficiency of photosynthesis and seed germination rates in trees of different age, and the activity of the genes in all of the tree ages was similar. There were also no differences in disease resistance. The researchers were unable to find any sign of programmed death and were also unable to explain the lack of senescence…

Washington, D.C., WTOP Radio, January 14, 2020: Warm winter triggers early cherry tree bloom on National Mall, but spares showstoppers

The recent warm winter weather, including back-to-back 70-degree days last weekend, has given cherry trees on the National Mall the reason to flower — two months before the start of the annual cherry blossom festival. But, don’t worry; they’re not those cherry trees. Predicting peak bloom dates is a yearly tradition for the National Park Service, local hospitality providers, tourists and locals trying to time their visit to the Tidal Basin. But the annual bloom watch focuses on Yoshino cherry trees. The trees flowering now are Higan cherry trees. “They’re autumnal bloomers,” said Brian Hall, National Park Service spokesman for the National Mall and Memorial Parks. “You’re going to see lots of branches blooming, but not the full tree.” Most of the Higan cherry trees are on the grounds of the Washington Monument, Hall said…

Atlas Obscura, January 14, 2020: How Aboriginal Hunting and ‘Cool Burns’ Prevent Australian Wildfires

There is a scar across Australia’s Western Desert. For millennia—no one is sure how many, though evidence of Aboriginal people’s presence in Australia stretches back 50,000 years—the Martu people used fire to hunt in the scraggly bush. In a practice called cultural burning, they set low blazes patient enough for small animals such as bettongs and wallabies to flee their burrows before the fire reached them. Years of cultural burning cleared underbrush, creating a patchy habitat preferred by the small animals Martu people most liked to hunt, while simultaneously preventing massive lightning fires from consuming the land. For the Martu, these fires were so vital that they were a means of maintaining life itself. “They would say, ‘If we weren’t out here burning, things won’t exist,’” says Rebecca Bliege Bird, a Pennsylvania State anthropologist who has worked with the Martu for decades. But when, in the 1960s, the Australian government pushed Martu people into towns, in order to test missiles on their land, the life-giving burns stopped. Lightning fires—large, hot, unscrupulous—took their place. In the 20 years it took the Martu to regain access to their homeland, the entire ecosystem was knocked off balance…

Philip Poynter Construction Safety, January 14, 2020: Tree felling operations lacked defined comms

A UK company has been fined following an incident when a worker suffered serious injuries after being struck by a tree in February 2016. Fort William Sheriff Court heard that four employees were felling trees on land adjacent to the A82 north of Fort William, contracted by the Forestry Commission. Whilst dealing with an 8m tree the injured workman made preparatory cuts and checked with the rest of the team to ensure they were in a safe place. He thought his colleagues understood that he was about to fell the tree. After the initial cut was made he made his felling cut at the same time as a co-worker dragged a large branch from the brash pile into the path of the felling tree. The tree stuck him on the left side of his helmet and left shoulder. HSE investigators found that the normal exclusion zone (no one positioned within two tree lengths of a tree being felled) was not adhered to on this occasion. A clearly defined system of communication would have prevented the misunderstanding…

Anaheim, California, Orange County Register, January 13, 2020: What is killing the native oaks of Southern California?

The Goldspotted Oak Borer, or GSOB, is an invasive beetle that is killing native oaks in several areas of Southern California. Susceptible oaks include coast live oak, canyon live oak, and California black oak. In many cases, GSOB has damaged or killed mature oaks valued for their beauty, wildlife habitat, and shade. Areas with large numbers of native oaks are particularly at risk. Unfortunately, oaks that are injured over several years from multiple generations of the GSOB often die. Although the Goldspotted Oak Borer was first identified in San Diego County in 2004, it wasn’t until 2008 that oak deaths were linked directly to them. By 2010, they’d killed more than 20,000 oak trees growing in forests, parks, and urban areas in San Diego County. Later infestations occurred in Idlyllwild in 2012, Orange County in 2014, and Los Angeles County in 2015. The three most recent outbreaks have all occurred in San Bernardino County…

Chico, California, KHSL-TV, January 13, 2020: Hazardous tree removal deadline, what you need to know

The Paradise Town Council and the Butte County Board of Supervisors passed ordinances requiring the removal of hazard trees damaged by the Camp Fire from private property that may fall into public roadways. The deadline to sign up for hazardous tree removal in the Camp Fire burn zone is Friday, Jan. 17. Ginessa Stark from CAL OES along with Jenna Johnson, one of the ‘Zone Captains” in Paradise joined Action News Now at noon to share what you need to know. If you choose to go with the state program, you will sign the right of entry form (ROE). Then officials will come in and take all the trees that are hazardous to the public right away, with no out of pocket cost to the owners, Stark said. If you want to take the trees down yourself, you can hire a private contractor to do so. If you have already had the trees taken down, CAL OES said you still need to sign the inspection access form. That allows the officials to go, make sure that you’re complying with the ordinance, and get you signed off. Afterward, you can get your rebuild permits…

Colorado Springs, Colorado, KRDO-TV, Colorado Springs forestry crews finish bulk of 2019 damaged tree cleanup on schedule

With nearly 2,000 people asking for 3,000 damaged trees to be removed from their property after last year’s late spring snowstorm, it seemed an overwhelming job for a 7-member crew in Colorado Springs. But on Monday, crew supervisor Dennis Will announced that the crew successfully met its goal of responding to those service requests by the end of 2019 — after seven months of steady work. “We cleared it two weeks ago,” he said. “We just wish we had the manpower to respond sooner. There’s probably 500 requests from people who got tired of waiting for a response. And our response doesn’t count some of the 50,000 park trees that have damage.” The forestry crew responded to reports of damaged trees along sidewalks or under city responsibility that threatened private property owners. “What really helped us is we got three new employees and $1 million in new equipment approved before the storm,” Will said. “The storm response cost around $233,000, with several departments contributing to the effort…”

New York City, Brooklyn Paper, January 13, 2020: State judge orders city to study Fort Greene Park revamp environmental harms

The city’s controversial scheme to axe a small forest worth of trees in Fort Greene Park hit a snag after a state judge ordered the Parks Department to conduct an environmental review that could delay the project for months. State Supreme Court Judge Julio Rodriguez III sided with the environmental watchdogs at Friends of Fort Greene Park in ruling that the Parks Department needed to study the $10.5 million project’s potential environmental impacts, saying the plan to fell upwards of 83 trees constitutes a substantial change to the green space, according an attorney for the plaintiffs. “This decision should awaken the department to reality,” said legal advisor Michael Gruen in a statement. “Environmental regulation is not enacted to be evaded as if it were merely an annoyance. It is designed to ensure serious and honest evaluation of environmental risks from the inception of governmental consideration of any project…

Phys.org, January 13, 2020: Climate change unlikely to drive sugar maples north

Climate is an important factor in determining a plant species’ growing zone. Some studies suggest that by the turn of the next century, climate change will have caused some species to spread several dozen kilometres north of their current distribution areas. Such changes could have major consequences on how land-based ecosystems function. But a northern migration isn’t in the cards for sugar maples, according to Alexis Carteron, who recently published his doctoral research findings in the Journal of Ecology. His work is supervised by Professor Etienne Laliberté of Université de Montréal and co-supervised by Mark Vellend of Université de Sherbrooke. Carteron and his colleagues at Université de Montréal’s Department of Biological Sciences and the Institut de recherche en biologie végétale reached this conclusion after conducting experiments in greenhouses at the Jardin botanique de Montréal using soil samples harvested from Mont-Mégantic National Park…

Genesee, New York, The Daily News, Jan. 13, 2020: Local forests losing their stories

The Erie Canal towpath was once the interstate for itinerant workers — hoboes, if you will — who traveled from town to town in search of their next farming or handyman gig. While doing so, they frequently stopped over on my family’s farm, which butts up to the canal. It was an attractive spot to set up camp because of the fresh water they could drink from a brook that runs through our woods, the same brook from which they ignited gas for cooking (there is a good reason it’s called “Gas”port). While there, they often killed time by carving their names and other things in the bark of the beech trees that are common in our woods. The smooth gray bark, so easy to cut with a pocketknife, has always been quite inviting to amateur artisans, not to mention young lovers who wanted their names forever inscribed in Mother Nature for all the world to see. The hoboes, the lovers, and anyone else interested in making a statement left their calling cards on the beeches — old-fashioned graffiti that remains to this day. Those trees tell stories…

Indianapolis, Indiana, Star, January 12, 2020: Indiana’s yellowwood trees ‘unlike any other on the planet’

Three years ago, on behalf of The Nature Conservancy I supported the designation of a portion of Yellowwood State Forest as a High Conservation Value Forest (HCVF). My reason for doing so was clear: I wanted to save the yellowwood tree. Happily, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources has done just that. The new HCVF will ensure rare yellowwood trees remain part of the Indiana landscape. The 591-acre HCVF will be called the Yellowwood Conservation Area at Yellowwood State Forest. Beautiful and rare, yellowwood trees are a state-endangered species in Indiana. They occur naturally in Indiana only in Yellowwood State Forest and Brown County State Park, which is the northern end of their natural range. The tree’s name comes from the yellow coloration of its heartwood, which has been used to make furniture in the past. Because Indiana’s yellowwood trees are located so distantly from any others in the U.S., I worked with the Hardwood Tree Regeneration and Improvement Center at Purdue University to learn if they are genetically distinct. We solved this mystery by studying the genetics of yellowwood trees, both inside and outside Indiana. Our analysis showed the ancestors of these trees are ancient, and they have been isolated from all other yellowwoods in the country for thousands of years. In short, Indiana has a yellowwood tree unlike any other on the planet…

Wellesley, Massachusetts, The Swellesley Report, January 11, 2020: Down goes the Hunnewell school white oak tree

With its fate sealed at a Wellesley School Committee meeting earlier in the week, the estimated 200-plus-year-old white oak at Hunnewell Elementary School property was chopped down by the Department of Public Works on Saturday. The crew started the job at 7am and expected to be working past noon. When I arrived a DPW worker in a cherry picker was carving up limbs on the 30-foot-high-ish tree. “We’ve already taken care of the hard part,” said one employee, keeping me behind the cones and tape. A report commissioned by the Wellesley Natural Resources Commission recently deemed the oak a “high risk tree,” unsafe for its location. The tree’s future had already been in question as a result of plans to re-do the Hunnewell Elementary School itself, but now the tree’s part in that equation is no longer a factor…

Fresno, California, KFSN-TV, January 9, 2020: Donors across world raise millions to protect sequoia tree grove in Valley

Housing won’t be built on California’s largest unprotected sequoia grove. A conservation group in San Francisco has purchased Alder Creek Grove. The massive parcel is located above Camp Nelson within the Giant Sequoia National Monument. It will someday provide another scenic area for families to go hiking. The beauty of the towering sequoias and pine trees at Alder Creek Grove is enough to take your breath away. Equally breathtaking is the incredible amount of money ‘Save The Redwoods League’ was able to raise to buy the scenic 530 acres so it could protect the majestic trees. League president Sam Hodder says over 8,500 donors raised $15.6 million to buy the land from the Rouch family of Springville. “People love the redwood forest and when they have an opportunity to protect a place as spectacular as Alder Creek, they step up and this was truly amazing,” says Hodder…

World Economic Forum, January 10, 2020: Chocolate you can trace back to the tree – a new vision of fairer, greener trade

How many of you like the taste of fine dark chocolate? Yes, I know. The answer is quite obvious. (Who does not love chocolate?) But how many of you know the farmers behind your chocolate? This asymmetry of information between the first mile (producers) and last mile (consumers) leads us to a shocking reality: • According to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), an estimated 500 million small farmers – men and women – produce most of the developing world’s food. Yet their families suffer from even more hunger, have higher rates of poverty and enjoy less access to basic social services than poor people in urban areas. • Despite being the ones who spend the most hours per day working, producers earn the least profit of all players in the value chain. • New generations of producers do not see a decent living option in agriculture. In the words of Francisco Numan Tene, a cocoa producer from Zamora-Chinchipe province in Ecuador who has been engaged in agriculture for more than 40 years: “Agriculture is a way to bequeath poverty to our children…

Rochester, Minnesota, Post-Bulletin, January 9, 2020: Calling the Lorax: City asks for tree preservation ordinance input

Rochester’s Committee on Urban Design and Environment is looking for public input to draft a city tree preservation ordinance. Trees in an urban environment provide multiple benefits — economically, environmentally, in public health and mental health. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sustainable Urban Forest guide, cities in forested states would benefit from a 40% to 60% tree canopy. Currently, Rochester has a tree canopy coverage of about 27%. That might also be on the high side once the final toll of the emerald ash borer beetle is tallied. CUDE’s ordinance draft calls for a 40% minimum canopy coverage for new and existing developments but won’t affect individual homeowners. The ordinance isn’t just a requirement to plant more trees. In order to include trees in development plans, city planners and developers will need to consider their development plans and how much impervious pavement is laid, and consider long-term land-use plans. The CUDE survey cites a slightly outdated Society of American Forests guideline recommending a minimum 40% canopy coverage. The updated guidelines do suggest that 40% to 60% canopy is achievable in forested areas, but the report stresses that how it’s achieved is the most important factor, not just the size or percentage of canopy…

Kennebunk, Maine, Post, January 9, 2020: Tree trimmers to start work in Kennebunk Light & Power District

As January continues, residents within Kennebunk Light & Power District territory should see Asplundh Tree Services in their neighborhoods, trimming trees. That is the word from KLPD General Manager Todd Shea, who said last week last week that customers should expect to see tree trimmers at work along several streets and roadways. “KLPD performs maintenance trimming to increase the safety of our line workers and improve system reliability for our customers,” he said. Representatives of the tree service would be notifying residents in person about the work, he said; if no on is around, they’ ‘ll hang a tag on the door. Those with questions should call the number on the door tag. The areas to be trimmed include…

Manchester, New Hampshire, Union Leader, January 8, 2020: Candia couple fights back after town declares crabapple tree ‘public nuisance’

A crabapple tree declared a public nuisance is at the root of a court battle between the town and a couple refusing to trim the 10-foot tree’s branches. Jennifer Heiberg has filed a complaint in Rockingham County Superior Court asking a judge to overturn the selectmen’s recent decision. The town has threatened to chop down the tree if Heiberg and her husband, Dustin, don’t remove some of the small branches sticking out into the road in front of their home at 14 Jane Drive. Selectman Brien Brock sent a letter to Heiberg dated Dec. 26 informing her and her husband they have 30 days to trim the branches in the town’s right-of-way. If they’re not cut back within that time, the town will remove the tree, the letter said. Heiberg argues that the tree isn’t a problem and that town officials can’t force them to do anything because the town never got a deed for the road and therefore it’s private. Heiberg said there are other, larger trees in town that pose a much greater safety risk and they’ve never been declared a nuisance. The dispute over the fruit tree began about two years ago, said Heiberg, who insists that it’s all political…

Chicago, Illinois, WBBM-TV, January 8, 2020: Friends Of The Chicago River Says Tree Removal At Legion Park Will Benefit Ecosystem

We first showed you the images on Tuesday – hundreds of trees chopped down at a park alongside the Chicago River system. As CBS 2’s Jim Williams reported Wednesday, the leveled trees in Legion Park shocked neighbors who did not see it coming. But Friends of the Chicago River said this is just the first step in a project that will actually improve the neighborhood. Hundreds of trees were chopped down and carried away along the North Shore Channel of the Chicago River in Legion Park, leaving it looking like the aftermath of a tornado. “It’s mindless, thoughtless, indiscriminate, heartbreaking destruction,” neighbor Janette Dingee said Tuesday. Painful it may be to see the trees go. But it is also necessary, according to Margaret Frisbie, executive director the nonprofit advocate group Friends of the Chicago River. “Because it’s a step-by-step process, and to start, you actually have to take down the trees that are there.” So that the banks of the river at Legion Park can be shored up – stopping erosion, and creating a healthier ecosystem, Frisbie says…

Cincinnati, Ohio, Enquirer, January 8, 2020: $1,500 worth of trees missing from Warren County Park District found

Nine trees ready to be planted at the Landen-Deerfield Park have disappeared, according to park officials. The Warren County Park District Nature Programs posted the news on Facebook on Wednesday, noting that nine blue spruce and white pine trees had been staged at the back of the park on Christmas Eve to be planted after Christmas. When staff members showed up on Dec. 26, the trees were gone. “These were very heavy trees with large root balls, and would have required a truck and either a bobcat or several strong people to move them,” the release states. A police report has been filed. Larry Easterly, Warren County Park director, said the trees – worth $1,500 total – were purchased with taxpayer dollars and donations from the Friends of Warren County Park District, a non-profit charitable organization whose mission is to promote, support, improve and protect the parks within the Warren County Park District. It is not clear if the trees were stolen or taken by mistake as a part of the Christmas tree recycling program, Easterly said. The park is also a drop-off point for cut trees after the holidays…

Annapolis, Maryland, Capital Gazette, January 8, 2020: Historian wants to clone pecan trees in historic Bowie grove before development. Developer says nut so fast.

One of Bowie’s first city commissioners didn’t just plant the seeds of government in the Washington suburb. He was a pecan fanatic. Thomas P. Littlepage spent 15 years hunting across nine states for the best varieties of tree nuts in the early 20th century, then brought them back to his Bowie orchard, according to a pamphlet published in 1917 by his farm, Maryland Nut Nurseries. Today, a portion of that land has been proposed for an 80-house development. Caruso Homes plans retain 61 out of 85 specimen trees on site, according to plans submitted to Prince George’ County officials. Farmer Eliza Greenman, a member of the Northern Nut Growers Association who studies the history nuts and fruits, hopes to inspect the land before work begins, ideally in the fall when the walnuts, hazelnuts, pecans, oaks, hicans — a pecan hybrid — and sweet gum balls. Greenman testified about the horticultural importance of the land at a Bowie City Council meeting Monday evening. She wants to analyze the remaining orchard and take cuttings from the trees so she can graft them to seedlings elsewhere, preserving the plants…

 

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2 thoughts on “And Now The News …

  1. Rest In Peace Sweet Tripp Halstead. No more hurting. You can go play in the Lords garden. We love you. We will miss you. My heart breaks for a little boy I never met. Prayers for his family. 😭😭🙏🏻

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