And Now The News …

New York City, Wall Street Journal, June 24, 2019: States Lean on Truckers to Halt Spread of Invasive Spotted Lanternfly

An invasive, plant-hopping pest that hitches rides on trucks and other vehicles is spreading along busy transportation corridors in the mid-Atlantic region, threatening billions of dollars worth of commodities including grapes, hops and hardwood. Truckers are being drawn into the fight to contain the spotted lanternfly as temperatures warm, spurring hatched eggs to develop into red-and-black winged adults. Carriers picking up or delivering freight in quarantined parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia are being required to get permits certifying they have been trained to recognize and eliminate the insect, and in some cases could be fined for not meeting the demands. While quarantines have been imposed to contain the spread of other pests, regulators say the spotted lanternfly poses a unique threat. Native to China, it feeds on a range of crops, weakening plants and excreting a sticky residue called honeydew that draws other insects and promotes the growth of sooty mold that can damage trees…

Evansville, Indiana, Courier-Press, June 24, 2019: Area Girl Scout dies, 3 others injured after a tree falls on her and others at Camp Koch

An eleven-year-old Girl Scout died after a tree fell on her at Camp Koch Monday morning. Girl Scouts of Southwest Indiana released a statement Monday night about the incident. “There is nothing we take more seriously than the safety and well-being of our girls and volunteers,” according to the release to media. “We have closed Camp Koch while we work with our camp officials, as well as local law enforcement, to investigate the incident and will release more information as available and appropriate. During this difficult time, the entire Girl Scout family mourns the loss of one of our girls, and we ask for privacy for the individuals and their families as they grieve and mourn this tragic loss.” Central Dispatch received a call around 11:30 a.m. that a tree had fallen on campers. Several other campers and volunteers were injured as well, according to the statement. In total, two juvenile and two adults were victims of the incidents, Perry County Sheriff Alan Malone said. Perry County Sheriff Alan Malone said all four victims were taken to various hospitals with unknown injuries…

Phys.org, June 24, 2019: Trees’ water-use strategies can intensify droughts

Nature, said Ralph Waldo Emerson, is no spendthrift. Unfortunately, he was wrong. New research led by University of Utah biologists William Anderegg, Anna Trugman and David Bowling find that some plants and trees are prolific spendthrifts in drought conditions—”spending” precious soil water to cool themselves and, in the process, making droughts more intense. The findings are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “We show that the actual physiology of the plants matters,” Anderegg says. “How trees take up, transport and evaporate water can influence societally important extreme events, like severe droughts, that can affect people and cities.” Anderegg studies how tree traits affect how well forests can handle hot and dry conditions. Some plants and trees, he’s found, possess an internal plumbing system that slows down the movement of water, helping the plants to minimize water loss when it’s hot and dry. But other plants have a system more suited for transporting large quantities of water vapor into the air—larger openings on leaves, more capacity to move water within the organism. Anderegg’s past work has looked at how those traits determine how well trees and forests can weather droughts. But this study asks a different question: How do those traits affect the drought itself?

Houston, Texas, Chronicle, June 24, 2019: Man dies after tree falls on his boat in southern Missouri

A 22-year-old southern Missouri man drowned after a tree fell on him while he was on the Current River. The Missouri State Highway Patrol says Levi Mayberry died Friday when the tree hit a boat he was on about 10 miles (16.09 kilometers) north of Van Buren. He is listed on the report as the driver of the boat. Two other people from Van Buren were taken to a hospital for treatment of moderate injuries. Carter County Coroner Eric McSpadden pronounced Mayberry dead Friday evening. The coroner said the accident occurred when storms with strong winds were blowing through the area…

Phoenix, Arizona, Republic, June 22, 2019: As Woodbury Fire burns, crews fight to save ancient Mother Tree in the Superstitions

Medusa. Mother. El Viejo. This ancient tree in the Tonto National Forest has gone by many names. Its exact age isn’t known, but experts with the Tonto National Forest estimate it is between 600 and 1,000 years old. The Medusa Mother Tree, an alligator juniper named for the flakiness of its bark, has survived many fires in its lifetime, signified by the scars on its branches. This week, firefighters worked to make sure the Woodbury Fire, which has now burned almost 80,000 acres in the Superstition Wilderness, didn’t cut its life short. “They did take extra efforts to put some protection measures in place in the area, and they think that was successful,” said Kay Beall, a fire information officer. The tree sits approximately 4,900 feet into the Superstition Wilderness in a wide, flat valley near Reavis Ranch, according to the Tonto National Forest. Reavis Ranch was named after Elisha Reavis, better known as the Hermit of the Superstition Mountains…

Victoria, British Columbia, Times-Colonist, June 23, 2019: Boy killed when tree fell had shouted a warning to friends

The 13-year old boy killed on a camping expedition by a falling tree shouted to warn his friends just before he was struck, his father said Sunday. Graham Caverhill said police have told him his son, Tai, managed to yell out a warning to his friends just before the tree came down on him. “I console myself that it’s tragic, but there is nobody to blame because the boys were just being boys out doing what boys should be doing,” said Caverhill.“They were in the woods, exploring and having a great time. They weren’t sitting at home on their phones,” he said. “Tai was with his friends and he yelled out to help them,” he said. Tai Caverhill, a Grade 8 student at Lansdowne Middle School, died on Thursday during a three-day school outing to Camp Barnard near Sooke. Gusting winds are suspected of knocking over a tree, pinning him. When emergency workers arrived they found him not breathing. Despite resuscitation attempts Tai was pronounced dead at the scene…

Billings, Montana, Gazette, June 23, 2019: Invasive Siberian elm trees around Billings struggle to bounce back from bad winter

It was a hard winter for the trees, too. In particular the Siberian elms around Billings are struggling to bounce back after a winter that saw extended sub-zero temperatures, and before that, a particularly dry fall. “A lot of them got knocked back pretty hard,” said Steve McConnell, city forester for Billings. “You’d think a tree with Siberian in its name would do a little better.” The worst cold snap of the winter hit in February, which went on to become the second coldest February on record for Billings. And it hit fast. The high on Feb. 2 was 52. The high on Feb. 4 was 3 below. In fact, February saw 19 days of below-zero temperatures — sometimes down into double digits. On six of those days the high never rose above zero. It was so cold that the sub-zero temperatures stretched into the first five days of March. Before that, Billings had a warm, dry fall, which left the Siberian elms a little weaker than they normally would have been going into the winter…

Washington, D.C., WRC-TV, June 22, 2019: Which Trees Are the Coolest? American University Researchers Battle the Heat

Using satellite imagery and infrared cameras, American University scientists are researching which tree species are the best at cooling us off. “Trees are our natural air conditioning system,” said Professor Mike Alonzo, who leads the AU research team. The findings will help determine which trees hold the most water and keep their leaves the longest in a downtown environment, where miles of sidewalk bake in the sun amidst rising global temperatures. “But then you have to think, all of the people coming in every day to be in the city are experiencing massive amounts of heat, and with our climate getting warmer, you’re gonna have more heat exhaustion, more heat stroke and a lot of potential health issues,” said Dr. Jessica Sanders, an urban forestry researcher at Casey Trees, a nonprofit aiming to protect trees in the District. AU researchers are taking measurements in city parks and using satellite imagery to assess which trees should be planted where. “We want trees that are gonna be robust to the hot, noisy, chaotic environment in which they live,” Alonzo said…

Raleigh, North Carolina, News & Observer, June 20, 2019: Residents stopped OWASA from harvesting trees before. Water utility will try again.

Conserving vast acres of forestland has helped OWASA provide Chapel Hill and Carrboro with decades of clean drinking water, while keeping plant and wildlife habitats intact. So when the Orange Water and Sewer Authority announced it was going to thin, clear-cut or burn roughly 1,900 acres of forest in 2010, hundreds of rural Orange County residents forced the utility to hit the brakes. Many were already wary of the nonprofit utility, which owns roughly 3,700 acres in Orange County, including 2,400 acres of forestland and three current or future drinking water reservoirs. The rocky relationship stretches back to the early 1980s, when farmland and properties were taken — under threat and one by eminent domain — and flooded to build the 500-acre Cane Creek Reservoir. Critics of the forestry management plan wondered why OWASA would risk water quality by bringing in heavy equipment and herbicide. They suspected the real reason was the money that lay in harvesting the timber…

San Diego, California, KFMB-TV, June 20, 2019: Tree trimmer rescued after becoming stuck on a 60-foot-tall palm tree

A tree trimmer was rescued Thursday evening in San Marcos after becoming stuck in a 60-foot-tall palm tree for over an hour. The man became pinned between the tree trunk and his safety lines when the crown of the tree he was trimming fell on him. He was bent backward and trapped until firefighters were able to get a ladder truck to him and pull the 100-pound crown of the tree off him. SDGE was asked to remove power lines to allow the large ladder truck to get close enough to rescue the man. The tree trimmer, who is believed to be 61-years-old, was transported to Palomar Hospital’s trauma center and is expected to fully recover…

Cleveland, Ohio, CleveScene, June 20, 2019: Tammy’s Tree Still Stands in Tremont, But Will be Coming Down Soon

Tammy Layton planted the Bradford pear tree on her Clark Avenue treelawn 19 years ago to honor her deceased parents. Last month, construction crews with the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) were cutting down trees on the south side of Clark between W. 25th and Quigley to make way for a new water main as part of a larger streetscape improvement project. Layton made the local news when she hugged her tree and threatened to tie herself to it to prevent its destruction. “This is a perfectly healthy tree,” she told Fox 8. “They can just trim it. There’s no reason to cut it down.” She was assured by ODOT that a city arborist would inspect the tree to determine whether or not it could be saved. At issue, evidently, were the tree’s roots. To make way for the water lines, ODOT said it would have to hack away below ground, and the damage to the roots could destabilize the tree and cause it to topple. As of Tuesday evening, the tree was still standing. But according to ODOT, an arborist with the City of Cleveland has inspected the tree and informed Tammy Layton that it will have to go…

Savannah, Georgia, ConnectSavannah, June 20, 2019: Former City Manager: Savannah must regain “passionate devotion” to strong tree policy

Pointed questions from former Savannah City Manager Michael Brown turned what might have been a sedate meeting about tree policy into a more spirited discussion about civic priorities. Held at the Massie Heritage Center and organized by the Friends of Massie, Wednesday evening’s panel “A Conversation About Trees” featured Gordon Denney, City of Savannah Greenscapes Department Director; Paul Daniels, board chair of the Savannah Tree Foundation; and Philip Perrone, member of the Savannah Park and Tree Commission citizen board. Denney received the bulk of audience questions as well as the most direct questioning from Brown, who left Savannah city government in 2010 and was in the audience as a member of the public. Brown asked Denny how many diseased or unwanted trees are currently being removed by the City each year. “We’re looking at 900 to a thousand,” Denney replied…

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2 thoughts on “And Now The News …

  1. Rest In Peace Sweet Tripp Halstead. No more hurting. You can go play in the Lords garden. We love you. We will miss you. My heart breaks for a little boy I never met. Prayers for his family. 😭😭🙏🏻

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