And Now The News …

San Diego, California, KGTV, June 13, 2019: Famed tree with Dr. Seuss connection topples over in La Jolla

A Monterrey Cypress known as the “Dr. Seuss Tree” or “The Lorax Tree” toppled over early Thursday morning in La Jolla. The unique shaped tree has been theorized to be the inspiration for the colorful trees in “The Lorax,” written in 1971 by Dr. Seuss. Seuss, whose real name was Theodore Geisel, lived in La Jolla from 1948 until he died in 1991. The tree is located in Ellen Browning Scripps Park near La Jolla Cove. The tree had become a tourist destination for Seuss fan around the world. As of Thursday night the tree was still lying on the ground. The cause of the fall is under investigation…

Jacksonville, Florida, WJAX-TV, June 13, 2019: Trimmer seriously injured in 50-foot fall from tree

A tree trimmer who fell from a pine tree Thursday morning while doing work on a property in Northwest Jacksonville was hospitalized with serious injuries. The homeowner told News4Jax that the man was in “pretty bad condition” after falling an estimated 50 feet. He was taken to a hospital by Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department personnel just after 9:30 a.m. Homeowner Duncan Jackson said everything was going well, but the workers couldn’t finish the job Wednesday because of the weather. He said they were only back working for about 30 minutes Thursday when the man fell. “It came forward and it seemed like a piece of the tree went backward and slapped him right off the tree and he came flying down,” Jackson said. Jackson said the tree service was hired by the city to cut down the tree as the city prepares to cut a new ditch along the property line…

Chicago, WBBM-TV, June 13, 2019: Plenty of Laws Protect Historic Buildings, But What About Long-Standing Trees?

There are rules to protect historic homes and buildings, but in many places no such laws exist to preserve magnificent towering trees. Carol McCullough learned that the hard way, when two large trees were removed from the lot next door in Evanston to make way for new construction. “To me, it was heart wrenching that they were torn down,” McCullough said. McCullough was surprised to learn in Evanston, unless the land is two acres or larger, and preparing to subdivide, residential property owners are allowed to remove any tree on their property, even tall impressive ones that might be saved somewhere else. “I think that’s why people live here, is because of the trees,” she said. In Illinois, there is no statewide law regarding the removal of trees, leaving a hodgepodge of ordinances that vary from municipality to municipality…

Cincinnati, Ohio, Enquirer, June 13, 2019: Cincinnati Zoning Board of Appeals set to decide fate of Lytle Park trees

Cincinnati’s Zoning Board of Appeals will hold a hearing Friday morning to decide the fate of four 50-year-old London Plane trees in Lytle Park. Former federal prosecutor and current Porter Wright attorney Kathleen Brinkman filed an appeal against the Cincinnati Conservation Board’s decision made in March to allow the removal of the trees. The trees were previously protected because they are located in a historic district. Western and Southern donated $1.6 million to the Cincinnati Park Board to renovate Lytle Park and the removal of the trees was part of the agreement made between the two parties. The park board already spent the money, so park board commissioner Kevin Flynn said he doesn’t believe the agreement can be changed now. Brinkman believes Western and Southern should not be able to control the fate of the trees, as they are public property. She said the park board failed to do its duty to protect the trees…

Brooksville, Florida, Hernando Sun, June 12, 2019: Expert advice on tree work in preparation for hurricane season

When asked which trees are vulnerable to a hurricane, Oliver Bevins of Bevins Tree & Crane Service said, “Every kind of tree is vulnerable in a hurricane. If a homeowner is concerned about a tree, perhaps it threatens the house, the power lines or could block the driveway, the best thing to do is call a tree expert. I recommend getting a certified arborist to look at the tree. We have one on staff. A certified arborist can tell if a tree is diseased or weakened even if it looks healthy and can advise the homeowner on how to protect himself and his property.” “Tree work is dangerous. We put safety first. I’ve spent countless hours in classes on safety and I pay my staff to attend them as well. Tree work is not the place to go Cheap Charlie.” Bevins started helping his dad as a child in the family logging business in the Adirondacks in New York. He felled his first tree at the age of twelve. By the time he left his dad’s company in his early twenties, he was adept at scaling tall trees and working a chainsaw…

Livonia, Michigan, Observer & Eccentric, June 12, 2019: Tree-clearing brothers sue Canton in federal court on harassment claims

The tree-clearing Percy brothers and their legal defender, the Texas Public Policy Foundation, have filed a federal lawsuit against Canton Township. It’s the third lawsuit stemming from Gary and Matt Percy’s battle with Canton Township over a tree ordinance that the brothers’ Texas attorney says violates property owners’ constitutional rights and imposes excessive fees. This time, foundation attorney Chance Weldon said the Percy brothers have a First Amendment retaliation suit against the township and several township representatives. He claims township officials harassed the brothers and their businesses after local news outlets shared their story about clearing trees for a Christmas tree farm. Township representatives have been demanding about a half-million dollars for Canton’s tree fund as compensation. Harassment, according to the federal complaint, included the township sending code enforcement officers to the Percy brothers’ other businesses to search for possible code violations not tied to the clearing…

Pasadena, California, Courthouse News Service, June 12, 2019: Europe Worries as Bacteria Wipe Out Ancient Italian Olive Trees

Italian biologists, laboratory workers and government officials under investigation for failing to stop the early spread of an incurable and catastrophic plant infection from Central America that is killing tens of thousands of olive trees in southern Italy will not face criminal charges, but the scientific investigation continues. In May, Italian prosecutors in Lecce closed a 3½-year-long preliminary investigation into how the deadly bacterium known as Xylella fastidiosa arrived and then spread throughout Puglia. (In America it’s also responsible for the Pierce’s disease attacking California’s vineyards.) The bacterium, called by some the “ebola of olive trees,” threatens to infect the rest of Europe. Puglia is a gorgeous region known for its food and beaches, and its old and productive olive trees. The region makes up the sweeping boot-heel of the Italian peninsula. It is Italy’s biggest, though overlooked, olive oil producer, with much of that production coming from the area devastated by Xylella. The investigation into Xylella is far from over. The Lecce prosecutors transferred their findings to colleagues in Bari, Puglia’s capital city, who now will examine how European Union and Italian funds were used to fight the disease. This preliminary criminal investigation grew out of a chorus of allegations that Italian authorities mishandled the response to the outbreak of Xylella fastidiosa, whose presence in Europe was announced in October 2013…

Westfield, New Jersey, Patch, June 12, 2019: Westfield Steps Up Tree Protection

In a move designed to counterbalance development in town, the Westfield Town Council voted unanimously to adopt an updated version of the Town’s Tree Preservation Ordinance on June 4. “The goal of this ordinance was to be more proactive about protecting our trees, particularly with regard to the ongoing development in Town,” said Mayor Shelley Brindle. “These more stringent requirements are being implemented with an eye toward thoughtful preservation throughout Westfield, including neighboring property notification requirements, increased fees for removal applications and penalty fines, and mandated donations to the tree trust fund above a certain removal threshold…”

New York City, The New York Times, June 11, 2019: Would You Like to Spend Forever in This Tree?

Death comes for all of us, but Silicon Valley has, until recently, not come for death. Who can blame them for the hesitation? The death services industry is heavily regulated and fraught with religious and health considerations. The handling of dead bodies doesn’t seem ripe for venture-backed disruption. The gravestone doesn’t seem an obvious target for innovation. But in a forest south of Silicon Valley, a new start-up is hoping to change that. The company is called Better Place Forests. It’s trying to make a better graveyard. “Cemeteries are really expensive and really terrible, and basically I just knew there had to be something better,” said Sandy Gibson, the chief executive of Better Place. “We’re trying to redesign the entire end-of-life experience.” And so Mr. Gibson’s company is buying forests, arranging conservation easements intended to prevent the land from ever being developed, and then selling people the right to have their cremated remains mixed with fertilizer and fed to a particular tree…

Riverside, California, Press-Enterprise, June 11, 2019: Riverside parent navel orange tree getting new protection

The tree responsible for every Washington navel orange — including the ones that gave the Inland Empire its first prominence as a citrus center — is getting new, longer-lasting protection from the disease that’s devastated the orange industry elsewhere. The cover over the parent navel orange tree at the corner of Arlington and Magnolia avenues in Riverside will hang over the steel structure that workers began installing in March, replacing a temporary cloth protection that officials admitted was “not beautiful.” The new screen is a synthetic material made by the company Econet. The screen’s lifespan is five to eight years, but it will be inspected regularly before that, said Georgios Vidalakis, professor and director of the citrus protection program at UC Riverside. “This one will buy us a few years so the city can design a more elegant structure like you see in arboretums — maybe a wood hexagonal pavilion that will be aesthetically more pleasant,” Vidalakis said. “Unless in the next few years we find a solution…”

Manchester, New Hampshire, Union Leader, June 11, 2019: Macron to send new tree to Trump after oak gift died

French President Emmanuel Macron downplayed the death of an oak tree he had offered President Donald Trump last year on Tuesday, saying people shouldn’t read symbols into everything and that he would send the American leader a new tree. The two men celebrated the special relationship between the United States and France during Macron’s state visit in April 2018 to Washington by planting the oak sapling on the grounds of the White House. It was put in quarantine because of fears parasites on the tree could spread to others on the White House property. U.S. officials this weekend said it had died, prompting a flurry of social media posts comparing its death to the difficult relationship the two leaders have had since that visit. Macron is at odds over the American’s unilateralist approach to trade, climate change and a nuclear deal with Iran. “We will send him another; it is not a tragedy,” Macron told Switzerland’s RTS network on the sidelines of an International Labor Organization meeting in Geneva. “Do not see symbols where there are none — the symbol was to plant it together…”

Los Angeles, California, Daily News, June 11, 2019: Why planting shade trees helps reduce the temperature of urban heat islands

Many of the landscape trees adorning urban cityscapes in Southern California are at or close to the end of their lifespans. While several species of oak, maple, crape myrtle, ficus, magnolia and other common shade trees have a life expectancy of 50-80 years or longer in unstressed environments, few reach their full potential in cities and urban areas. Why? In order to accommodate growing populations, cities have large areas of paved concrete and asphalt surfaces that create ‘urban heat islands (UHI)’.These hard surfaces absorb large amounts of heat that builds up during the day and is released at night, leading to much higher night temperatures in cities than in surrounding areas. The good news is that trees offer many benefits that offset the impacts of UHIs. Cities with larger tree canopies are a testament to this fact and have fewer adverse impacts from UHIs than do cities with low tree canopies…

Dallas, Texas, D Magazine, June 10, 2019: Did a Tree Fall on Your Property? Here Is What You Need To Do.

A half hour of torrential storms did a lot of damage to the trees of Dallas Sunday afternoon. After the 70 mph winds subsided, photos began to circulate on social media of large trees completely uprooted, branches strewn on the streets, and cars and homes crushed under the weight of massive trunks. And, on top of that, more than 200,000 people are without power 24 hours later and it could be days before it’s turned back on. Janette Monear, the president and CEO of the nonprofit Texas Trees Foundation, said it’s hard to know exactly how many trees were lost in the storm, but she estimates hundreds, if not thousands. Matt Grubisich, Texas Trees’ director of operations and urban forestry, says the storm highlights the need for better urban forestry management in Dallas to avoid planting trees in sensitive areas, like next to power lines. Homeowners may not think too much about the trees on their property until one collapses in their yard or on their roof. But there are precautions to ensure trees on properties remain sturdy during high winds and are dealt with properly should they fall…

Savannah, Georgia, WTOC-TV, June 10, 2019: Keeping up tree health to prevent falling limbs, trees in storms

Severe weather sometimes brings with it wind gusts capable of exposing just how weak trees and limbs are around your property.
Now that we are into severe weather and hurricane season, you may want to take a close look at what’s around your home, and what may come crashing down in the next storm. WTOC spoke to a certified arborist on Monday to learn more about why you should consider having a visual inspection of trees near your home every couple years, along with a pruning plan every three to five years. A visual inspection might reveal weaknesses in trees that you might not notice until it’s too late, like one instance for a homeowner in Effingham County. “Luckily, it didn’t completely crush it. It kind of gave it a glancing blow that crumbled part of the side, but we can still get in there.” Jonathan Hathaway said there weren’t any real tell-tale signs that he recognized that something was wrong with the tree next to his shed, until it snapped in half during a storm within the last week, revealing rot inside…

Washington, D.C., Smithsonian magazine, June 10, 2019: A 16-million-year-old tree tells a deep story of the passage of time

Paleobotanist Scott Wing hopes that he’s wrong. Even though he carefully counted each ring in an immense, ancient slab of sequoia, the scientist notes that there’s always a little bit of uncertainty in the count. Wing came up with about 260, but, he says, it’s likely a young visitor may one day write him saying: “You’re off by three.” And that would a good thing, Wing says, because it’d be another moment in our ongoing conversation about time. The shining slab, preserved and polished, is the keystone to consideration of time and our place in it in the new “Hall of Fossils—Deep Time” exhibition that opens June 8 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The fossil greets visitors at one of the show’s entrances and just like the physical tree, what the sequoia represents has layers. Each yearly delineation on the sequoia’s surface is a small part of a far grander story that ties together all of life on Earth. Scientists know this as Deep Time. It’s not just on the scale of centuries, millennia, epochs, or periods, but the ongoing flow that goes back to the origins of our universe, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of all life, up through this present moment. It’s the backdrop for everything we see around us today, and it can be understood through techniques as different as absolute dating of radioactive minerals and counting the rings of a prehistoric tree. Each part informs the whole…

Corporate Knights, June 10, 2019: Trees and the laws of supply and demand

Worldwide, Interpol and the United Nations Environment Program estimate the value of the yearly trade in illegal harvested timber at between US$30 billion and $100 billion, or 10-30% of global wood trade. About 7.3 million hectares of forest – an area the size of Panama – is lost every year to deforestation, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. At the current pace, the Earth’s tropical rainforests will be gone within the next century. An alternative development model is clearly needed for countries like Papua New Guinea (PNG) that struggle with rule of law and corrupt governance, in order to meet UN Sustainable Development Goals and lift Papua New Guineans out of poverty while ensuring environmental integrity. Much will depend upon China, not only because of its strengthened trade relations via the Belt and Road Initiative but also because it is the destination for PNG’s raw logs. Beibei Yin, the China policy and advocacy senior advisor for Global Witness, says China should extend its own sustainability policies to PNG. China has invested US$350 billion into programs like forest conservation and erosion reduction as well as poverty reduction to protect its own natural resources and adopt a more sustainable and long-term development model. “But China hasn’t broadened its ambitions overseas yet,” Yin says…

Washington, D.C., The Guardian, June 9, 2019: Trump and Macron’s symbolic friendship tree ‘has died’

The tree planted by Donald Trump and his French counterpart, Emmanuel Macron, at the White House as a symbol of their countries’ ties has died, according to multiple media reports in France. The oak was given as a gift to the US president during Macron’s visit in 2018. In a tweet at the time, Macron said: “100 years ago, American soldiers fought in France, in Belleau to defend our freedom. This oak tree (my gift to @realDonaldTrump]) will be a reminder at the White House of these ties that bind us.” Relations between the two leaders have since frayed – over issues ranging from Iran to trade – and, it appears, the tree has fared little better. Le Monde first reported its demise last week, quoting a French diplomatic source, which was later confirmed by Le Figaro. The French president offered the young oak to Trump on the occasion of a state visit to Washington in 2018…

Traverse City, Michigan, Record-Eagle, June 10, 2019: Tree rules budding

Regulations aimed at protecting Traverse City’s tree canopy are budding as a committee hones their recommendations. Trees larger than six inches in diameter would get special consideration in the city’s multifamily, commercial and industrial zoning districts. That’s how tentative ideas from city commissioners, planning board members and employees would have it. City Planner Russ Soyring is a member, as are commissioners Brian McGillivary, Tyler Bevier and Chairwoman Linda Koebert. All four sought and got input from other planners on those ideas at a recent meeting. Planning commissioner Anna Dituri was absent. Anyone cutting two trees larger than 24 inches in diameter at breast height would need a land use permit, Soyring said. Same goes for cutting 10 or more trees 6 inches in diameter at breast height. Zoning ordinances would also require a site plan review for any development that would require clearing more than 20,000 square feet of woody vegetation, Soyring said. Anyone building new or expanding existing structures would need to comply, according to a summary from Soyring. The time and money a hearing would take could deter such clearings, Soyring said. “I think based on conversations historically, people would like to avoid coming to the planning commission if they can,” he said. Exemptions for those in one- and two-residence neighborhoods from all save a few of the regulations could change, Koebert said — they’d need at least one tree per 4,000 square feet of property under rules discussed Tuesday…

Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, June 7, 2019: The ash trees are gone and maples are in decline, Homewood boosts its canopy with new oaks, beech trees

Area communities have had to grapple with a devastating loss of ash trees in recent years might now have to struggle with dying maple trees. Bryon Doerr, landscape maintenance supervisor for the village of Homewood, said his crews are in the process of removing about 500 dead or dying maple trees. “It’s going to be an ongoing process,” he said. But Doerr was able to make some headway in replacing some of those trees last weekend thanks to a grant of free trees through the nonprofit environmental conservation group OpenLands. Members of the village’s public works crew teamed up with staff and volunteers from OpenLands to plant 48 trees along village parkways. Many of the trees were planted along Spruce Road, where homeowner Rosemary Browning said many ash and maple trees had been cut down in recent years. She said she’s very happy a chinquapin oak tree was planted in the parkway in front of her house. “I love trees,” Browning said. “Only God can make a tree. Trees speak their own language. They dance in the breeze. And they add lot color and lots of life to an area.” Down the street another resident said she also was happy a new tree was planted in the parkway in front of her house to replace a Norway maple that had started dying two years ago…

Atlanta, Georgia, WSB Radio, June 10, 2019: Atlanta’s shrinking tree canopy – the City is ‘losing…its identity’

Greg Levine is ready with his list: “Everything from East Atlanta to Ormwood, Candler Park, Lake Claire, Virginia Highlands, Morningside, Poncey Highlands is starting to see tear-downs and tree removal, the Old Fourth Ward has critical issues, Midtown, Buckhead.” Levine goes on. “West End and Adair Park, and Sylvan Hills neighborhoods are starting to talk about putting big homes in now and removing the trees when they remove a small home.” Levine is co-Executive Director at Trees Atlanta, which advocates for preserving existing trees and replacing those lost to development. He says that list encompasses city neighborhoods with tree cover – otherwise known as canopy – under threat due to development. “It’s not going to be a positive outcome for the city if we don’t really figure out a good way to fix this,” Levine tells WSB Radio. It’s a reference to Atlanta’s laws meant to protect trees. For the first time in 20 years, the Tree Protection Ordinance is getting a fresh look for a re-write. Last week, the city hosted four public meetings for input ahead of the crafting of a draft later this summer. The threat to Atlanta’s old, prominent shade trees says Levine, is development – whether single-lot or high density – ramped up in recent years. “The (current) ordinance allows for trees to be removed and money just being put into a (recompense) fund. That’s good because it helps slow people removing trees when they develop a property, but what it doesn’t do is get them necessarily to redesign or design a project that actually saves more canopy,” says Levine…

National Geographic, June 6, 2019: Prehistoric tree is first of its kind found below the Equator

Millions of years ago, a volcano erupted in what’s now the Patagonia region of southern Argentina, leaving behind a huge caldera. Water accumulated in the crater, and eventually it became a lake teeming with countless plants, insects, and other life-forms. Over time, these creatures fossilized deep within the lake’s layers of mud and ash, creating a kind of geological jackpot for today’s paleontologists. Now, the ancient lake has yielded a particularly exciting treasure: fossils of a 52-million-year-old tree that is the first of its kind found in the Southern Hemisphere, suggesting the plant evolved there. Fruit and leaf fossils from the site, called Laguna del Hunco, belong to a still-living genus of trees called Castanopsis, or chinquapin, that today is found largely in the mountain rainforests of Southeast Asia. Castanopsis is very similar to its close relative Castanea, or chestnut, producing edible nuts and “incredible, showy spikes of flowers,” says Penn State paleobotanist Peter Wilf, part of the team that describes the find today in the journal Science. The discovery helps scientists better understand the life history of an economically and ecologically important plant group…

Fresno, California, KFSN-TV, June 6, 2019: How a Fresno teen saved her mom’s life seconds before a 100-feet tall tree would’ve crashed onto her

A young woman raced to evacuate her family after a tree got uprooted and was seconds away from falling onto their home on Thursday in Fresno. Three homes were damaged by that one pine tree – nearly 100 feet tall – that collapsed in Central Fresno near Pine and Barton. Two will need extensive repairs to four or five of the rooms. The woman, Amaisai Mesa, helped save her mom’s life. “I just heard this loud thump and cracking sound. I looked out the window, the tree’s down. I’m screaming at my brother – ‘The tree is down! the tree is down!'” she said. Mesa was at home with her three brothers when the tree uprooted and fell onto her neighbor’s home. “We come out of the house, we get away from the power lines and we’re thinking, ‘This tree is going to come down’…”

Salem, New Jersey, NJ.com, June 6, 2019: Iconic oak tree nearly 600 years old and a ‘vital’ part of N.J. history collapses

One of New Jersey’s oldest and recognizable symbols is no more. The Salem Oak Tree, estimated to be between 500 and 600 years old, uprooted and collapsed Thursday. When news of the tree’s demise spread across social media, residents from in and around Salem came to the tree’s site, took pictures, and shared memories of the iconic tree. Cars traveled from both ends of Broadway, trying to find parking spaces to park their cars and walk up to see the fallen tree for their very eyes. One unidentified man became emotional , saying seeing it go down was like seeing a part of the City of Salem go down. Another woman had hopped the fence, hoping to get a glimpse of the tree up close, but was told to get back over the red brick wall that showed faded remnants of moss and ivy that had once lined it. The Salem Oak Tree meant that much to the residents of the city and Salem County…

Kansas City, Missouri, Star, June 6, 2019: Is your tree dying? Use these visual clues — from rot to fungi — to help you decide

Recent storms revealed possible hidden dangers lurking in our yards. Our beloved trees could be showing signs of defects. Unfortunately, a tree defect claimed the life of a local resident. Discovering all the issues that could lead to failure is not possible. Luckily there are visual signs to help you detect potential problems. Taking a few minutes to evaluate your trees may help save your property and loved ones. Here are a few visual clues. Tree bark is a protective layer like our skin. Absence of bark and exposed wood are signs of a tree in trouble. Once the bark layer is lost, moisture and decay occur. Missing bark means that the cambium, or growth layer of the tree, is dead. The cambium layer is the only living part and the lifeline of a tree. Under the cambium layer is dead wood. Its purpose is to support the tree. Once exposed, the wood begins to lose its strength…

Los Angeles, California, Times, June 5, 2019: Laguna Beach simplifies the process used to remove trees from public places

The Laguna Beach City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved an updated policy to simplify the public tree-removal process, which in some cases has required multiple arborist opinions and site meetings. “We spent a significant amount of time administering our current policy,” said Shohreh Dupuis, assistant city manager and public works director. In the last three years, the city has had to remove more than 100 trees, Dupuis said, partly because of storm damage. Some of those cases required extensive disease testing and arborist visits, costing up to $5,400, as well as the expense of 40 to 60 staff hours, she added. The new policy would remove some of those steps. For a public tree to be removed, it would have to meet criteria that it is damaging public or private improvements, is diseased, dead or dying, or represents a fire hazard…

Baton Rouge, Louisiana, WBRZ-TV, June 5, 2019: Resident demanding help, answers from her 2015 request after tree destroys home

A woman’s mobile home has been destroyed after a large tree fell through it during a tornado. Now she’s looking for help to move forward. Cindy Bankston says she was lying in her bed when it happened. “All I heard was glass shattering everywhere,” she said. “My bedroom wall was leaning against my head.” As her eyes adjusted to the darkness, she saw the large tree trunk inches from her face. Bankston says she feels blessed to be alive, but being on a fixed income isn’t sure where to turn next. That tree blew over during the same EF0 tornado that took out part of Bear Creek Western Store. Bankston received some assistance from the Red Cross and has started a fundraiser to help raise recovery funds. A church has also offered to help raise funds. “I do know that I need help, I need help to get this tree removed,” said Bankston…

Santa Barbara, California, Noozhawk, June 5, 2019: Santa Barbara City Council OKs Chopping Down of 9 Healthy Trees

Marilyn Dove rents a home on the 800 block of Sea Ranch Drive in Santa Barbara. Outside her home, within the street’s 35-foot setback, stand several towering, 60-year-old trees, pine and eucalyptus. The trees, everyone acknowledges, are poorly managed and pruned, and the foliage is thin, but they are healthy. So Dove was stunned to learn that the city’s street tree advisory committee and Parks and Recreation Commission both voted to have the trees cut down — at the request of neighbors, and with the support of the property owner. “These trees have just undergone a tremendous stress of drought and survived it,” Dove told the City Council on Tuesday. “A lot of what you are seeing is stress, and with the rain and everything, you can see those trees come back and be beautiful.” We’ll never know. The City Council on Tuesday voted 5-1 to deny Dove’s appeal of the removal. Councilwoman Kristen Sneddon voted no, and Councilman Randy Rowse left the meeting before the final vote…

Selfgrowth.com, June 5, 2019: How to help trees recover from transplant

Even though we take a lot of care while transplanting trees, they tend to get stressed as they adjust to their new homes. This is what arborists call transplant shock and this term encapsulates the whole range of problems the plant can experience after they are transplanted. It is tough for trees when they are going through transplant shock but it is not something they cannot bounce back from. All that is needed is for you to know the symptoms and the recovery techniques and sufficient time. Some telltale signs of a tree in shock are leaves dropping, leaf scorch, premature fall color, brown leaf tips, stunted flower and twig growth, budding in late spring, or branch dieback. Trees in shock and dead trees are deceptively similar. There exists an easy way to tell the difference. Pick a twig from the tree and scratch it with a pocket knife or with the finger. If the twig is bright green and moist underneath, your precious tree is alive…

Anaheim, California, Orange County Register, June 4, 2019: Tree trimmer killed while working in Laguna Hills

A tree trimmer who was apparently injured by falling branches while working in Laguna Hills died on Tuesday, June 4. A resident spotted a man who appeared to be injured in a tree near 25481 Barents, and called authorities at 4:31 p.m., Orange County Fire Authority Captain Tony Bommarito said. Responding paramedics found one man trapped by heavy limbs in a eucalyptus tree and hanging unconscious from a harness. The tree trimmer appeared to have been seriously hurt when at least one large branch fell on his head or neck, Bommarito said. He may have died before an ambulance could arrive. A crane was needed to remove the branches trapping the man so that firefighters could bring him down from the tree, officials said in a Tweet at 6:01 p.m. The man’s identity was not immediately released. He did not appear to be a city employee, and may have been working for either himself or a private company, Bommarito said…

Reading, Massachusetts, Patch.com, June 4, 2019: Can A Forest Have Too Many Trees? In Reading, the Answer Is Yes

Reading’s town forest has a problem. There are too many trees and some of them must go. When last we heard from the Town Forest Committee the eight-member committee was warning residents about the dangers of dog feces. That was last September in a message to residents who walk their dogs in the town forest. Tuesday night at the Select Board meeting the committee, led by chair Bill Sullivan, introduced a task that the town can no longer avoid. Reading’s town forest needs thinning. Back in the 1930s, the town planted trees as part of a project to harvest the wood. That was done for some time but when it ceased, Reading’s forest started looking more like a corn field. As board member John Halsey said, “It doesn’t look like a forest and it never really has.” Today the trees are too close together and the result is unhealthy trees. It’s also a safety risk as the trees become more vulnerable to environmental stresses. A healthy forest has small, medium, and large trees. Reading’s forest is a collection of unhealthy large trees… a forest of corn stalks…

Manhattan, Kansas, The Collegian, June 4, 2019: The emerald ash borer devastates ash tree populations. Here’s how K-State is preparing for the beetle’s arrival

Kansas State has already begun the process of removing ash trees in anticipation of the spread of the emerald ash borer beetle, an invasive insect species whose larvae are destroying ash tree populations across North America. If you’ve been on campus recently, you may have noticed a handful of ash trees on campus (specifically around Dole, Kedzie and Shellenberger halls) with the outer layer of bark scraped off in a ring around the base, with a sign warning not to disturb it. These “girdled” trees are sacrificed in order to detect potential EAB infestation. While the girdled trees on campus did not yield any signs of the EAB in 2018, K-State has taken a proactive management plan to reduce the effects that the invasive insect will inevitably have on the university…

NPR, June 4, 2019: Getting Fire From A Tree Without Burning The Wood

A scientist walks up to a cottonwood tree, sticks a hollow tube in the middle and then takes a lighter and flicks it. A jet of flame shoots out from the tube. It seems like a magician’s trick. Turns out, there’s methane trapped in certain cottonwood trees. Methane is the gas in natural gas. It’s also a powerful greenhouse gas. So how does it get inside towering trees like the ones on the campus of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee? “The wood in this particular species naturally has this condition called wetwood, where it’s saturated within the trunk of the tree,” says the lighter-flicking scientist, Oak Ridge environmental microbiologist Christopher Schadt…

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2 thoughts on “And Now The News …

  1. Rest In Peace Sweet Tripp Halstead. No more hurting. You can go play in the Lords garden. We love you. We will miss you. My heart breaks for a little boy I never met. Prayers for his family. 😭😭🙏🏻

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