And Now The News …


Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, February 22, 2018: Battling buckthorn: Regional tree initiative enlists help from homeowners to eradicate invasive plant

Collectively, Chicago region forest preserves, including those in Lake and Cook counties, spend more than $1 million annually to eradicate buckthorn and honeysuckle, two of the area’s most invasive plants, according to the Chicago Region Trees Initiative. But the population of these species, especially buckthorn, continues to expand, said Matt Ueltzen, a restoration ecologist with the Lake County Forest Preserves. Indeed, 42 percent of Lake County’s tree landscape is buckthorn, the highest percentage in the region, with Cook County coming in second at 32 percent, according to the initiative. Those figures include not only the natural areas managed for the public by forest preserve districts and others, but also land owned by parks, businesses and homeowners. Seventy percent of the trees in our region are on private land, according to Lydia Scott, director of the Chicago Region Trees Initiative, which focuses on Cook, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry and Will counties…

Angola, Indiana, Herald-Republican, February 22, 2018: Man injured in tree work mishap dies

A Fremont man has died as a result of injuries he suffered in a Feb. 6 tree-trimming accident in Bethel Township in Branch County, Michigan, on Tuesday. Brian Thompson, 56, sustained a fractured skull in the accident, Branch County Sheriff’s Office authorities say, after he was hit in the head by a falling tree the afternoon of Feb. 6. Thompson was flown from the scene off of Clearwater Road near Cranson Road by an air ambulance and was taken to Parkview Regional Medical Center for treatment. Thompson died at Parkview. Thompson was a farmer and had worked at Dexter Axle, Fremont…

New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rutgers University, February 22, 2018: Trees have sex? Rutgers researchers have all the answers

A few years ago, Rutgers researcher Jennifer Blake-Mahmud was working on a botany project in Virginia when colleagues pointed out a striped maple, a common tree in the understory of mountain forests from Nova Scotia to Georgia.  “They told me, ‘We think it switches sex from year to year, but we don’t know why,’ and I said, ‘No way! How can that be?’ Blake-Mahmud said. “And that was when I decided I needed to find out what was going on.” In research published in the journal Trees: Structure and Function, Blake-Mahmud reports that striped maples not only change their sex periodically, but that they can wait until the last minute – three weeks before flowering – to do it. The switch appears to be triggered by physical damage, which can prompt a branch to flower female if it’s cut off a male tree…

Kalispell, Montana, Flathead Beacon, February 22, 2018: Mitchell to stand trial in June for destroying county-owned trees

Flathead County Commissioner Phil Mitchell is scheduled to stand trial in June, nearly a year after he was charged with felony criminal mischief for allegedly killing six cottonwood trees at a public park near his home on Whitefish Lake. Mitchell was previously set to stand trial this month, but prosecutors and the defense filed a motion to reschedule the trial for June as they continue to prepare their cases… According to court records, on July 11, a Flathead County Parks and Recreation Department employee found six dying or dead cottonwood trees in a half-acre county-owned park known as Lake Park Addition just south of Whitefish Lake State Park. The trees appeared to be girdled, a tactic that involves removing a thick strip of bark ringing the tree’s circumference, causing the tree to die. The Flathead County Sheriff’s Office opened an investigation into the destruction in July and retained an arborist who determined it would cost more than $30,000 to replace the trees…

Hartford, Connecticut, Courant, February 21, 2018: Jon Lender: State would pay $6.25 million in 2007 Parkway deaths caused by tree’s fall

State officials have agreed to pay a $6.25 million settlement to end a decade-old legal case arising from the deaths of physician Joseph Stavola and his wife, attorney Jeanne Serocke-Stavola, on June 9, 2007, when a 70-foot tree fell on their Volvo as they drove on the Merritt Parkway in Westport. Their sons, then 9 and 7, witnessed their parents’ deaths from the back seat. A three-page settlement agreement of a pending Superior Court lawsuit against the state was filed with the General Assembly Tuesday by the office of Attorney General George Jepsen. It was signed by lawyers for the state and the family of the surviving sons, James and William Stavola — who after the tragedy were brought up by Joseph Stavola’s brother and sister-in-law in the Hartford area. Tuesday’s filing starts a formal approval process under which the state House and Senate will have three alternatives: vote to endorse the settlement; reject it by a three-fifths vote in each chamber; or do nothing, which would result in automatic approval of the settlement after 30 days…

Honolulu, Hawaii, KHNL-TV, February 21, 2018: Task force working on removing hazardous trees on Big Island

A task force says it is working on eradicating albizia trees on the east side of Big Island within the next several weeks. The Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported Monday that the Hawaii Island Albizia Task Force has planned four control projects costing $1 million. Big Island Invasive Species Committee Manager Springer Kaye says the first project is nearly complete. The first project targeted all albizia within 328 feet (100 meters) of a 1-mile (1.6-kilometer) stretch of the Puainako Extension where the more 100 feet (30.5 meters) tall trees have caused significant traffic hazards…

University of California – Riverside, February 20, 2018: Tropical trees use unique method to resist drought

Tropical trees in the Amazon Rainforest may be more drought resistant than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside. That’s good news, since the Amazon stores about 20 percent of all carbon in the Earth’s biomass, which helps reduce global warming by lowering the planet’s greenhouse gas levels. In a study published Monday in the journal New Phytologist, a team led by Louis Santiago, a professor of Botany & Plant Sciences, found that tropical trees in Paracou, French Guiana have developed an unusual way to protect themselves from damage caused by drought. The trees make use of an abundance of living cells around their xylem to conserve and redistribute water in drought conditions. The xylem (the scientific name for wood) is the non-living tissue of a plant that transports water and nutrients from the soil to the stems and leaves. Santiago said studying drought in one of the wettest places on Earth might seem counterintuitive, but recent droughts, including record heat and drought during the 2015-16 El Niño, are already threatening the Amazon Rainforest. If trees die because of those droughts, the carbon they store will be released into the atmosphere, where it will further exacerbate global warming…

King, North Carolina, The Stokes News, February 21, 2018: Frustration of a tree farmer

I have been a tree farmer for over 50 years. I am approaching the age of 77 and I remember reading “Weekly Reader” as required reading when I was in the fifth grade. One of the frequent articles in the “Weekly” was about how good it was to plant trees and the amount of money you could make off thinning pulpwood and cutting of saw timber. It encouraged young people to be good conservationist like the President encouraged with the WPA and CCC programs, during the Great Depression. I have never been so disappointed at anything I have ever done as to plant trees and lose four percent per year so the economic royalist can profit from the creation of the oversupply of trees resulting in cheap prices of trees and allowing great profits going to the saw and pulp mills. President Trump has made an effort to reduce “dumping” of timber and lumber from Canada into the United States in an effort to reduce the oversupply. As a result of the lobbying efforts of the mills, the tree farmer has been given more regulations and fines if we don’t plant trees. Many mills have sold off their tree farming lands because it is easier to pay lobbyist to force the private landowner to grow trees at a loss than to grow it themselves. Once a landowner plants trees, it takes 40 years or more to grow merchantable timber. Some small amount of pulpwood may be cut after 20 to 25 years. A tree farmer can’t decide to get out of their tree crop after one year for they make a commitment for 40 years until the trees are mature. Most tree farmers will have one timber harvest in a lifetime and are not fully informed of what is happening to them…

Watertown, New York, Daily Times, February 20, 2018: North country researchers seeking to produce ‘sweeter’ maple trees

Could cloning create “sweeter” maple trees that could ultimately reduce the cost to produce syrup? That’s what maple researchers here are trying to find out, using funding from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program. “If producers can plant and harvest from trees with naturally higher sugar sap concentrations, productivity would increase and costs would decrease,” Cornell University plant pathologist Keith L. Perry, director of the Uihlein Foundation Seed Potato Farm in Lake Placid, said in a release. “If we can clonally propagate what are known as ‘sweet trees,’ there would be an opportunity to establish a nursery crop industry as well.” “We’re glad we have the support of the senators to do this kind of work up north,” added Michele E. Ledoux, coordinator of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program, which is funded through the state Senate and administered through the state Department of Agriculture and Markets. “The potential for maple sugar in Northern New York is phenomenal.” Mrs. Ledoux, also executive director at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Lewis County, said the research project, while unique for maple, is similar to research done here and elsewhere on potatoes and other plants and trees to improve production…

Chicago, Illinois, Tribune, February 20, 2018: After removing dead tree from garden, can that wood be used in fireplace?

In response to the question about using a dead white ash tree for firewood: Winter is a good time to remove large dead ash trees, as well as do some pruning, as there will be less impact on the garden since the ground is frozen and perennials are dormant. Perennials right next to the stump may get damaged when the stump is ground out. If you plan to plant perennials or small shrubs in the same spot as the stump, ask the vendor to grind the stump extra deep. Remove the resulting wood chips and replace with garden soil when the weather permits. Dig the whole stump out if you want to plant a replacement tree in the exact same spot. Otherwise, shift the new tree over a bit to save on digging the stump out. Another thing to consider is the increase in sunlight once the trees are removed. Some of the existing garden plants may need to be moved to a shadier spot in the garden, while others that were struggling in the shade may perform considerably better with the additional sun. Your white ash was likely killed by an insect called the emerald ash borer that has decimated the ash tree population in the Chicago region over the last few years, with white ash (Fraxinus americana) being the last to go. Very few ashes will survive the damage caused by this insect unless the tree is being treated with an insecticide. It is best to remove the dead ash tree in your garden this winter as the potential for falling limbs increases quickly for ash trees once they die. You will be able to use the wood from dead ashes in your fireplace, but do not transport the ash logs out of Illinois. Let your arborist know that you would like the logs cut into firewood length. Consider renting a log splitter if there is a large volume of wood to split…

The Dalles, Oregon, Chronicle, February 20, 2018: City: Good time to trim trees, bushes

The City of The Dalles is encouraging residents to trim trees on or near their properties that block public walkways and streets. Except in the downtown area, property owners or occupants, not city staff, are responsible for trees on their property or on the right-of-way next to their property, according to information provided by the city. Check trees and shrubs that extend over sidewalks, streets and alleys. Mid-February through mid-March is a good time of year to make your property safe, city staff said. Proper pruning is important for the health of trees and shrubs. The Arbor Day Foundation offers a series of “Ask an Arborist” how-to videos to demonstrating the ABCs of pruning. Other resources can be found on the internet or by consulting professionals…

Savannah, Georgia, WSAV-TV, February 20, 2018: Tree cutting on I-16 and I-95 helps driver safety

You may have noticed trees being cleared from the medians along I-16 and I-95. According to the Georgia Department of Transportation, the goal is driver safety. “Over the last three years, we have seen 472 fatalities from striking trees which we consider fixed objects,” says GDOT spokesperson Jill Nagel. “Sixty percent of fatalities is motorists leaving their lane and crashing and fifty percent are hitting fixed objects.” Removing these trees Nagel says will save lives. “We are trying to clear the road ways so when someone departs from their lane, we are giving them more room of a clear zone.” But cutting was not the original idea.“We were talking about maybe thinning out. But because of the age of these mainly pine trees, we couldn’t thin them out because the root systems are all grown together…”

United Press International, February 19, 2018: ‘Loneliest tree in the world’ offers evidence of Anthropocene’s beginning

Scientists have discovered evidence of the beginning of the Anthropocene, the newest geological epoch. The evidence came in the form of a “golden spike” found in the heartwood of the “loneliest tree in the world.” Though scientists have shown that humans have been influencing the planet’s ecosystems for thousands of years, many consider the sudden spike in radioactive carbon caused by the testing of nuclear weapons in 1950s and 1960s the mark of humanity’s newly dominant role as chief driver of climatic change. Now, scientists have found direct evidence of that golden spike in a lone tree, a Sitka spruce found on Campbell Island, which lies in the middle of the South Ocean. The spruce is called the loneliest tree in the world because the next nearest tree lies 125 miles away in the Auckland islands. “The impact that humanity’s nuclear weapons testing has had on the Earth’s atmosphere provides a global signal that unambiguously demonstrates that humans have become the major agent of change on the planet,” Christopher Fogwill, a professor of glaciology and palaeoclimatology at Keele University, said in a news release. “This is an important, yet worrying finding…”

Omaha, Nebraska, KETV, February 19, 2018: Wind topples giant tree onto cars neighbors claim city was supposed to have removed

Neighbors who live on Lincoln Street near 30th said a large tree that fell should have been removed months ago. Alissa Miller said she was in the shower around 11:00 am Sunday when she heard the news. “My roommates’ boyfriend was banging on the door, ‘hey there’s a tree on your car,’ are you kidding me?” Miller said. The large tree and many broken branches landed on top of two cars parked in the street. ‘The wind took it is what broke it today,” Miller said. Miller and her roommates said the city marked the tree with a green “X”, meaning it should be removed, and had even put up a warning sign last fall. “Eventually it blew away and the city never came back to take the tree down,” Lilly Pitts said…

Yahoo Finance, February 19, 2018: Plant the right tree in the right place this spring

Georgia Power works every day to keep reliability high across the state and, with Georgia Arbor Day marking the start of the spring planting season this month, the company encourages customers to make the right landscaping choices around homes and businesses. Planting the right tree in the right place may help decrease the likelihood of a power outage in the event of a storm while ensuring that power lines are clear of trees and brush provides also easier access to the company’s power lines, which means quicker power restoration after a storm. Georgia Power recommends dividing your yard into three specific planting zones – the Tall Zone (trees 60 feet or higher), the Medium Zone (trees no taller than 40 feet), and the Low Zone (trees and shrubs no taller than 25 feet). Trees and shrubs in the Low Zone may be planted 15 feet from electric utility wires. In addition to helping customers select the right trees to plant, Georgia Power maintains 160,000 line acres and 24,000 miles of transmission and distribution lines under guidelines set by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). These maintenance activities are an essential piece of the company’s commitment to ensuring reliable service for 2.5 million customers in every corner of the state…

Centralia, Washington, Chronicle, February 19, 2018: Centralia Closes Fort Borst Park Playground Due to Risk From Dying Trees

The city of Centralia announced Friday it would close the Fort Borst Park playground as of this afternoon, citing concerns from an arborist regarding the stability of two ailing Douglas firs and forecasted stormy weather for the weekend. “The area will be taped off for public safety,” city attorney Shannon Murphy-Olson wrote in an email. “The city is in the process of contacting a tree removal company to make arrangements for topping of the tree(s) of concern.” Certified arborist Ray Gleason, of Cascade Tree Experts, spoke in the public comment portion of Tuesday’s Centralia City Council meeting expressing grave concern for the safety of children at the playground, along with frustration at a perceived lack of interest in the problem on the part of city staff. “I’m extremely concerned and I hope that everyone is,” he said Tuesday. “There’s probably greater than 50 branches directly on top of that swing set … I cannot believe this has been allowed…”

Mother Nature Network, February 15, 2018: Tree rings reveal our past — and our future

Trees are timekeepers. Count the concentric growth rings circling the heartwood of a chopped log and you’ll know a tree’s age. It’s a fun fact, for sure, but tree-ring dating (technically known as dendrochronology) goes far beyond determining how old a tree is. Trees are also meticulous record keepers of climatic conditions. By unraveling the rich data stored in tree rings, scientists can do everything from dating archaeological sites and preventing forest fires to documenting planetary history and offering a crystal ball into our environmental future. “Trees are natural archives of information,” says Ronald Towner, an associate professor of dendrochronology and anthropology at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “They stand in one place for a long time, sort of recording in their rings the environment around them. Anything that affects a tree — precipitation, temperature, nutrients in the soil, fires, injuries — can show up in the rings…”

San Jose, California, Mercury News, February 15, 2018: Whose is bigger? Two Northern California colleges claim world’s tallest campus tree

Nearby colleges and universities commonly have football team rivalries, but in Humboldt County they compete to have the largest growing tree on campus. College of the Redwoods and Humboldt State University don’t compete athletically but the CR Forestry and Natural Resources program is coming after HSU’s claim last year that they have the world’s tallest tree on a college campus. This week, CR students measured what could be the largest tree by diameter on a college campus in the United States. However, these things are hard to keep track of because there’s not a Guinness World Record for the tallest or largest by diameter trees on college campuses, CR forestry professor Tim Baker said. “Basically, we don’t know,” he said about the largest on-campus tree designation. “We were throwing it out there in response to HSU saying they had the world’s tallest tree [on a college campus] because they don’t know either…”

Great Lakes Echo, February 15, 2018: Discarded Christmas trees a weapon against Asian carp

Canada’s Royal Botanical Gardens sit near the western end of Lake Ontario, just a short drive from the U.S. border. When the weather is warm, visitors come to see acres of gardens with roses, lilacs and other collections in bloom. In the winter, it’s much quieter. But scientists stay busy, protecting wetlands from destructive carp. And they’re using an unusual weapon: Christmas trees. Ecologist Andrea Court walks across Grindstone Creek, which is frozen solid. In each hand is a discarded Christmas tree stripped of all of its festive ornaments. Holding the base of the trunks, she drags the trees behind her, leaving a pathway of twigs, pine needles and pieces of brown bark. Her face is red from exposure to temperatures that hover near the freezing mark. “This job is very weather-dependent, so you go when you can,” she says…

London, UK, Daily Mail, February 15, 2018: Researchers use new laser scanning tech to `weigh´ trees



New laser scanning technology is being used to “weigh” trees, in a project which could help more accurately assess the role forests can play in tackling climate change. Lasers are used to collect hundreds of thousands of points of data a second from the canopy, which are processed to build a three-dimensional picture of the tree revealing its structure and its volume, which allows estimates of mass. For example, one sycamore tree in Wytham Woods near Oxford was found to have nearly 11km (6.8 miles) of branches, double that of much taller tropical trees measured as part of the study, the researchers said. It is hoped the information will give a more accurate picture of the amount of carbon absorbed by forests, as part of efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, as well as help predict how trees might respond to climate change…


Staten Island, New York, Staten Island Advance, February 14, 2018: Staten Island nature: The many lives of a dead tree

In natural woodlands, fallen and decaying trees are much more noticeable in winter than in summer when surrounding vegetation distracts attention. Though these trees are no longer alive, they provide shelter and sustenance for many other organisms in the woodlands. In natural environments, dead trees and other decaying plant materials play a vital role in the recycling of nutrients and the development of topsoil that is necessary for a forest to go through a natural succession of ecosystems. Even before they fall to the ground, most dead trees are already serving as an apartment for a wide variety of life, from micro-organisms to vertebrates. The start of a tree’s downfall often begins when the bark is damaged, allowing fungi and bacteria to enter. The dead heartwood in the center of a tree is often exploited by these decomposers. In many cases, the center of a healthy-looking tree is almost entirely hollowed out many years before it dies…

Barf Blog, February 14, 2018: Risk assessment ‘tolerable’ for tree that killed woman

Risk assessments are fraught with value judgements scientists make when choosing the upper and lower boundaries of numerical ranges and the assumptions made, especially those involving human behavior. Conrad Brunk (right) and co-authors explored this in the 1991 book, Value Judgements in Risk Assessment. For the many food safety risk assessors and analysts out there, a New Zealand tree may offer a lesson. A tree in Rotorua, known as Spencer’s Oak, was deemed to be of a “tolerable” level of risk when it came down in a Jan. 2018 storm and killed a woman. The 150-year-old oak, believed to be around 23m tall, blocked Amohia St, trapped 56-year-old Trish Butterworth in her car. She died at the scene. The risk assessment of the tree has been revealed in documents released by Rotorua Lakes Council to Stuff under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act. Benn Bathgate reports that in a tree assessment report from an arboricultural contractor dated February 28, 2017, Spencer’s Oak and a second tree were assessed. “The assessed risk levels for these trees all fall the tolerable level,” the report said…

Kenwood, California, Kenwood Press, February 15, 2018: Questions surround fire damaged tree and vegetation removal

As PG&E is looking to wind down its aggressive post-fire tree culling program, Sonoma County is ramping up a federally-funded project that aims to take down fire-damaged trees along 90 miles of roads if they pose a danger of falling into county roadways. While the initial survey for the program is finished, the number of trees targeted is not yet available. Adobe Canyon Road homeowner Patti Everett became aware of the county project when a survey crew showed up at her home – the last house before the Sugarloaf State Park entrance – and put aluminum tags on many of her second- and third-growth redwoods surrounding an auxiliary structure that burned in the October fire. Her home is intact. “It’s very, very sad,” Everett said, noting that redwood trees are fire resilient and that many of those tagged by the county’s consulting firm, ACRT, don’t seem to be damaged or even in the county’s right of way. “I want to make sure that none of them are taken down by accident,” Everett said…

Forbes, February 14, 2018: Tax-favored money grows on trees

A tree entrepreneur profiled in Forbes inspired me to look for publicly traded firms in the same line of work. There are more than a few, and they tend to be organized as real estate investment trusts. If you want growth in your portfolio, standing timber is not a bad way to get it. Lumber barons get to treat their profits from harvesting wood as low-taxed capital gains. That cushy deal extends to shareholders in forest-product companies organized as REITs. Potlatch (PCH), for example, paid out $1.53 a share last year, all of it classified as long-term gain. When it completes a pending acquisition, this REIT will have 1.9 million acres of timberland and ample opportunity to make that dividend greener. Rayonier (RYN), another tree REIT, owns, leases or manages 2.7 million acres. Its $1 dividend last year was 100% capital gain…

Cleveland, Ohio, Plain Dealer, February 13, 2018: South Euclid’s Tree Commission could take on a larger role; trees planted at Oakwood

Trees are a nice addition to any city, but they can occasionally be the subject of a dispute. To that end, City Council’s Service Committee met Monday evening to discuss a change in procedure regarding tree-centered disputes. In the past, if there was a problem concerning a tree on public property, the city’s arborist, Dean Grida, would make a decision on the matter. The committee, however, recommended to a full council vote a change that would have the nine-member South Euclid Tree Commission resolve such disputes. Committee chairperson and Ward 4 Councilwoman Jane Goodman said the amendment came about because of a recent incident. “A resident in the Cedar Center neighborhood who loves trees and lives on a corner lot decided she would plant an orchard of fruit trees on her tree lawn,” Goodman said. “That creates a hazard…”

Marin, California, Independent Journal, February 13, 2018: Tiburon committee nixes tree cutting proposal

A proposal to cut down 42 trees in Tiburon seems to be headed to the chopping block. The Tiburon Parks, Open Space and Trails Commission on Monday voted 4-0 to recommend that the Town Council deny the proposal, and to instead come up with a compromise to save some of the trees. Commissioner Philip Feldman was absent. The proposal to remove 21 blue-gum eucalyptus, 15 Italian stone pine and six Monterey pine trees near the McKegney Green soccer field off Tiburon Boulevard was pitched as a fire risk and safety solution. Residents Ron and Duffy Hurwin, who applied for the tree removal as the McKegney Green Knoll Native Tree and Plant Restoration Project group, pointed to the Oakland Hills fire of 1991 as an example of how eucalyptus trees fuel wildfire. They also argue that limbs from eucalyptus trees fall without warning and are dangerous in an area frequented by youth. Commissioner Jim Wood said while that testimony is compelling, the method is “extreme. It has to be denied just on the pure love of trees…”

Naperville, Illinois, Daily Herald, February 13, 2018: Naperville tree preservation project offers wood for artists

Creative types who want to join the ranks of the woodworkers, furniture producers, guitar makers and brewers who are carrying on the legacy of a 250-year-old tree can get a piece of it on Saturday. The Naperville Parks Foundation, which is leading an art-based preservation project featuring the former Hobson Oak, is offering kiln-dried wood from the tree from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 224 N. Washington St. in Naperville. Artists who commit to create pieces of art or furniture for charity auctions beginning this fall can pick up their raw material for free during Saturday’s event. The wood is part of the second batch to be kiln-dried after the tree was cut down in November 2016, said Mary Lou Wehrli, a Naperville Parks Foundation board member…

Dubois, Pennsylvania, Courier Express, February 13, 2018: Removal of 180 mature ash trees changes the face of 2 Lancaster County parks

The giants have been felled in Lancaster County Central Park and its neighbor, D.F. Buchmiller County Park. About 180 large and doomed ash trees were taken down in a salvage cut that has resulted in a startling change in appearance to the popular Central Park. Large yellow stumps dusted with sawdust and shorn at ground level now border roads, playgrounds, pavilions and picnic tables throughout the 544-acre Central Park on the southeast edge of Lancaster city. The smaller 79-acre Buchmiller Park, along Willow Street Pike, had a handful of ash trees removed. The trees that have been cut over the past two months are the ones deemed to be a safety hazard to park users and motorists…

 

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